4 answers

What kinds of doctor can I be?

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4 answers

Richard’s Answer

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There are so many opportunities after medical school... different specialties appeal to different individuals.
Broadly there are family practice doctors, internal medicine and its subspecialties, and surgery with its subspecialties. There are also physicians that don't fit in these such as psychiatry, radiology, pathology , physical medicine/rehabilitation.

Or you can follow a nonclinical route in research or even hospital administration.

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Valerie’s Answer

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I agree with Richard's answer. There are so many specialities, and then you can choose a specialty like cardiology, and get even more specific (pediatric cardiology). There are so many options in medicine but I will list a few of the typical ones. The best way to see what you like is to rotate with different specialities and get involved.
Cardiology: the heart
Neurology: the brain
Dermatology: the skin
Surgery
Nephrology: the kidney
pediatrician: doctor that works with kids
OB/GYN: gynecologist is a doctor for females, an obstetrician is specifically for pregnant women.
Emergency Medicine: works in the ER
endocrinology: works with the hormones in your body
anesthesiology: helps puts patients to sleep during surgery and monitor them
Radiology: review and diagnose x-rays, CT scans and all other imaging
Pathology: a doctor that receives specimens (biopsies, blood, stool, urine) and helps diagnose the patient
orthopedic surgeon: doctor for bones, muscle and joint problems
ENT: ear, nose throat
ophthalmologist: eyes
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Joel’s Answer

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Richard's answer above is spot on. Medical school leads to many different options with the most common, of course, being further training (at least 3 years worth) of either primary care (pediatrics, adult/internal medicine, family practice) or specialty and subspecialty care (any of the surgery pathways. There are several pathways that require a first year of general type training before starting further specialty care (neurology. radiology, ophthalmology and a few others). And although it IS still considered training and some of that is a drag, at the same time, you get paid (now, I think, about 50K/year) and you ARE working as a doctor.

An increasingly popular option -although still a small minority of students do this- is getting further training in public health or business or health administration.
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Yasemin’s Answer

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Hi Robert, I agree with the previous answers, there are many specialties out there. I think once you are in medical school and begin rotations in the different specialities you will get a better understanding of the field you want to practice in. In each field there are certain things to consider in making the choice of the physician you want to be, patient interaction, time commitment, level of work, etc. Definitely take your time and focus on your studies once you begin medical school your path of the kind of physician you would like to be will be better clarified.

Best of luck!
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