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I would like to double major in Economics and Political Science and then maybe going towards a law degree, what would be the best way to set up a four year plan to be make double majoring easier or more manageable?

I would really like to go after and tackle a double major but have been put under the impression that if I don't set up a four year plan to allocate time to do so it will become very hard to double major #major #economics #political-science #double-major

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Shahbaz’s Answer

The most important point in your degree is to understand that you need to learn the skill set not the certificate which tells you that you are skilled on it. So in simple terms, your learning path is important than what you can put on paper in four years time.

Having said this, your first priority should be to understand how you can learn both majors in a way that you not only earn the degree but also have a proper understanding of the subjects. Life is not a race so enjoy the process instead of focusing on the speed. Therefore, I have put a few suggestion for you:
- avoid distraction | reshuffle your priorities and ensure that you eliminate all those tasks which are not important for the next four years.
- quality time | the true learning of a subject comes when you give it proper time with frequent intervals. If you would like to work on multiple majors, you should identify what parts of the day you are most focused and how can you put those parts for your study.
- planning | avoid over planning things, you should have a monthly target divided into weeks where you should measure yourself against only one principle...did you waste any time? if the answer is NO and you are behind the schedule even then you are on the right track.
- believe in yourself | the most important ingredient especially when you are planning to achieve high.

Hope the above would help.
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Casey’s Answer

1) Identify exactly how a double major will help you. If you planning on getting a law degree, few employers or peers will care that you double majored. Even if you don't pursue a law degree, Economics and Political Science are so related that most employers will group them together. Economics is a more marketable degree, and it should be possible to take a few Political Science classes on the side with it. The only reason you should double major is because you are 100% sure that you want to study these and only these things in college (because you probably won't be able to take many other classes and still fulfill both degrees' requirements).


2) If you're still eager to double major, make a list of two things: your school's general education requirements and the basic class requirements of each major. Most likely, there will be a good degree of overlap (an Economics History class might fulfill a general requirement, a PoliSci requirement and an Econ requirement, for example). Figure out how you can maximize your first two-three years completing these requirements, and then you will be able to fill in the rest with electives. If you have to finish in 4 years, you'll want to frontload the requirements and save the electives for later so that you can be flexible depending on which classes are available. In doing this, pay attention to sequencing to make sure that you don't plan to take Econ 101 and Econ 102 in the same semester.


3) Remember that class schedules change and degree requirements change! You may have to tweak this plan several times. Meet with an advisor or counselor to review your plan and see if it makes sense with what you want to gain during college.

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