6 answers

Is the medical field for rich kids only?

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As a pre medics student, sometimes I feel like the path I’m choosing it’s going to lead to my downfall
#medical #medicine #doctor

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6 answers

Xavier’s Answer

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Knowledge will get you further than any dollar amount ever will. Scholarships are usually available for those that truly need them, and work hard to earn them. Reach out to the financial department at the school and see what options are available. I say work hard and be one of the smartest people in the room, and I'm sure the right help will come your way!
I appreciated it’s helpful Irene M. Translate
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Corey’s Answer

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Wow! good question though I never really thought about it, a lot of wealthy families produce physicians. In most countries I bet that’s the case since you would never get into medical school unless you were an excellent student by age 13-14 and placing tops on your exams. Wealthy families tend to send their kids to strong schools, tutors, summer enrichment. I was slinging hay bales and busing tables for my summers.

I was not wealthy, I was an OK college student but I persevered, paid my way through college and medical school and got into a Harvard training program.

In the US, it’s all about hard work, dedication, and finding your way through the hurdles that block each turn. It’s expensive but if you are smart, live simply and stick to a solid financial plan, you can make it without a wealthy family (though it would be easier to send the bills to a rich uncle!!)

Good luck!
Thank you..... have you ever met an international student in medical field Irene M. Translate
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Syed’s Answer

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Hi Irene,

I've grappled with this question for many years now. In my anecdotal experience, most of my friends and peers who went on to medical school came from comfortable 2-parent homes with north of $100k household income, home ownership, and educated parents. In fact, a good portion of my pre-med friends in undergrad were children of doctors themselves who got their start shadowing at their family friends' practices. As is the case with anything people covet, the well-to-do will always have a leg up. Since their parents paid fully for college, they never had to worry about taking on a job while going to school just to survive. They didn't have the burden of student loans constraining their decision making. They could afford to spend a whole summer just working for free as a volunteer somewhere.

I do not share this to discourage, rather my goal is to show you who you're going up against. I have seen people from less privileged backgrounds make it to medical school and become doctors as well, but they had certain exceptional qualities and a decent amount of good fortune that got them there. Their less fortunate families put everything on the line and lived hand to mouth to give their kids the opportunity to focus on getting into med school. They barely slept and worked multiple jobs while keeping top grades. They found mentors from better off backgrounds that gave them some of the insider info their more wealthy peers possessed. They were willing to take more time to get their application in the best shape, and accepted rejection multiple times. They had practical back up plans if the medical school thing didn't work out. They hunted down scholarships and special programs for students from lower income and minority backgrounds that are trying to get into medical school.

When you're less well off, you need to work two or three times as hard to maybe get 60-75% of the results. Whenever I was down about this reality, I would think back to a word of encouragement a friend shared with me "Every rich kid has some poverty somewhere in their family line. One person broke the cycle." If you get into medical school and successfully become a physician, your children will be in the same position that your wealthy peers are in now. That's what you should be striving toward.
Wow that’s worth it. It’s better to prepare my mental state from this moment Irene M. Translate
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Jamie’s Answer

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No, or at least in my country, it's actually one of the professions that could make you rich. It depends on how will you use that profession and the path you will take afterwards. If you do well in school or make good connections, you can find yourself in good employment, or even have your own clinic in the future. Every profession can make someone rich, but it depends on how you will apply that profession in the real world.

What was the reason you took this course? Plow through your adversaries using that cause. Otherwise, if you really feel that this isn't the field for you, then talk to your counselors or someone you trust who knows you well and can give a more informed opinion.
Thank you. I realized I never talked to my advisor for a long time Irene M. Translate
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Niaz’s Answer

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This is a very thought provoking question! I would say the answer is yes and no.

Yes: To get into medical school you'll need to fulfill pre-reqs at a college (community or university) and that will cost money. Then you will have to take the MCAT which is like $250, and MCAT prep classes will cost you anywhere from a couple hundred to thousands. Then, you will send in your primary application which can cost anywhere from $25 to $3000. Then every seconday application you send in (which will be many because some schools don't filter it and just want money) will cost you about $50. Then, once in school you can pull out grad loans to support yourself but that will be around $100,000 a year.

No: I am not rich, and I made it to medical school. I took out loans in undergrad and if I was more careful I could have put some of that loan money aside and paid for MCAT exam and prep classes. Then, I worked 2 years full time to save up and pay for my medical school application. Once I got in, I have been using loans to pay for everything! If I was rich, I wouldn't have had to pull out loans for everything and I could have applied sooner, but a few years waiting/saving money and no amount of loan money would stop me from choosing this career path again!
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Kim’s Answer

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There are a few medical schools offering free tuition, although you probably have to pay your living expenses. There are also philanthropists who have stepped up and covered full tuition for entering med students. I believe this happened in Houston, among other places. https://www.cbsnews.com/news/tuition-free-medical-school-how-the-nyu-school-of-medicine-is-going-tuition-free-60-minutes-2019-12-29/
Thank you.... I will look into that Irene M. Translate
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