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What are some useful study strategies? Did you listen to music while studying?

I'm in high school hoping to go into either a health or law profession after college. I am currently undecided about which university I want to go to and what my major will be.
#study #college


Here are some study tips that I find really helping .. use schemes- it helps you remember all parts of a topic- .. make summaries - if you're reading a long topic with multiple paragraphs summarize each one in a single sentence then gather them to be use in your revision- .. use Pandora app which will help you stay focused ..make chunks .. study a hard subject first when your attention is the highest then an easy one to give your brain a break 😉 then another hard one and so on ..having a study partner maybe a good thing to encourage you Finally there is an online course on Coursera platform called learning how to learn so check it out I'm sure it will help you Alaa A.

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Ross’s Answer

First, since you're headed for college, you likely have already developed pretty decent study skills in high school. Once you're in college, keep doing whatever it is that got you there. Your workload in college will be much greater, and the hours you put in on studying will go way up, but the way you get through it all won't be much different. This rule holds true whether you're moving from high school to college, from college to graduate school, med school or law school, or from school out into the job world.

Second, once you get there, folks may say to you, 'How can you study here? It's too [quiet] [loud] [crowded] [empty] [whatever]!' Ignore them. Once you settle on a place and a method that works, stick with it. I confess I was terrible at studying in college. When I'm in a quiet place, my mind wants to wander hither and yon and I can't focus at all. I concentrate best when I'm surrounded by lots of noise and crowds, and can put the wandering part of my mind to work blocking out the chatter. I did my most efficient studying in the college cafeteria during lunch and dinner. But I had a hard time explaining why this worked for me and brushing it off when folks ribbed me about it. As a result, I wasted a good amount of time trying to study in ways that were not very productive, simply because that's how other folks told me I should do it. So when people say 'Our study group is really helping us all out with this class' or 'That place is great for studying', if you know their suggestion doesn't fit the way you study best, politely say thank you and keep on doing it your way.

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Jamie’s Answer

Study strategies differ from person to person. Try them to find out which one is the most comfortable for you and which one helps you retain more information. Some study strategies that were applicable to me are as follows:
- Quick read all materials an hour before the exam (some people prefer a clear mind before exams, but I tend to forget a lot so refreshing them all before exams help me remember details).
- Study in a quiet environment (even music distracts me)
- No one in my line of sight and no other things that can make me lose my focus
- Study time is before going to sleep (actually, I'm not sure if I studied until I fall sleep or studying makes me sleepy but I often find myself sleeping on top of my notes. Nonetheless, I do best when this happens.
- Connect/relate things, make acronyms, keep notes, do other things that makes it easier to retain the information you want
These are just some and I actually enumerated the weird ones to show how we totally could have different study strategies! Hoping you'll find one that suits you.

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Alena’s Answer

Everyone provided great advice so far, so I won't reiterate. I've always listened to music while studying and still listen to music during most of the work day. I found listening to video game soundtracks to be helpful while studying during college because it provides background noise but doesn't take your focus away from studying

a couple interesting articles on this topic:
https://desktime.com/blog/why-you-should-listen-to-video-game-soundtracks-at-work/

https://vocal.media/education/why-you-should-listen-to-gaming-soundtracks-while-studying

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Jamie’s Answer

Study strategies differ from person to person. Try them to find out which one is the most comfortable for you and which one helps you retain more information. Some study strategies that were applicable to me are as follows:
- Quick read all materials an hour before the exam (some people prefer a clear mind before exams, but I tend to forget a lot so refreshing them all before exams help me remember details).
- Study in a quiet environment (even music distracts me)
- No one in my line of sight and no other things that can make me lose my focus
- Study time is before going to sleep (actually, I'm not sure if I studied until I fall sleep or studying makes me sleepy but I often find myself sleeping on top of my notes. Nonetheless, I do best when this happens.
- Connect/relate things, make acronyms, keep notes, do other things that makes it easier to retain the information you want
These are just some and I actually enumerated the weird ones to show how we totally could have different study strategies! Hoping you'll find one that suits you.

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Bronwyn’s Answer

I agree with the comments above, focus and get yourself in a space where you can do your work easily and without distraction. Everyone is different with music - some find it a distraction, others don't. It may depend on the nature of what you are studying or what you are doing (reading vs. memorizing). One thing that I had to really work at as a study habit was time management - get work (quality work) done when you can, even if you are not in the mood. If you "knock it out" sooner rather than later, then you have the rest of the night/weekend to do what you want. I learned the hard way (as did my daughter, who is now a college freshman), that if I sacrificed a bit up front (maybe sometimes choosing to do my work from 5 - 8p on a Friday night or 11a - 2pm on a Saturday), then I didn't have to deny myself time with my friends further into the day or weekend.

Also with the virtual learning and working everyone is doing now, keep your patterns as consistent as possible. My daughter was doing her work on her laptop in bed for the first two weeks and then started complaining of back pain. Now she forces herself to sit at a desk and it keeps her much more focused and less sore!

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David’s Answer

Each person has their personal way to study, some uses music, some use quiets areas, some do as group study, some do a home, coffee shop, and etc. This question you have to ask yourself and see your study habit in order to determine what is the best study strategies. Music, Phone, Video Games, Television, Computer and etc. are somewhat consider as distraction but some are consider useful due to they are use to it or they needed that sense of distraction or belonging to help them stay in what they want to do. For myself, everything I listed are also my way to study depend on what I am studying for and the amount of time I have spend on it. But always set an alarm when studying because you always want to give your brain, eyes, body, and etc. some rest in between so you feel more refresh and down time which will help you do better.

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Prentice’s Answer

I recommend trying out different methods and you will naturally know which feels the most comfortable to study. For me, I tried the traditional study with headphones on inside a study room. Didn’t suit me too well. After many different studying methods I learned that complete silence was best for me. No music and no talking. This put me in the best shape to study the best I can. Whenever I was able to escape to an actual silent area, I usually did much better on tests.

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Devin’s Answer

Studying for me was always about limiting visual and immediate distractions. That would mean leaving my dorm room, where I could play video games or take a nap, and finding a study room. Listening to music tends lessen nearby distractions if you can't find your own quiet place. I never found studying with other people to be very productive for me, but many people experience the opposite. I used flashcards a lot and would encourage you to rewrite your notes before starting to study, as this will help you figure out what you need to brush up on more. Try your best to get out of your dorm room and work earlier rather than late. Good luck!

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Riley’s Answer

When I was in high school I used to listen to classical music while studying, but during college I preferred silence. I really think that is just a preference thing and you should try both to see what works for you! A lot of people say that chewing the same flavor of gum while you study as when you take a test will help you remember because taste and smell are associated with memory, but I've never tried that trick.

For me, the most helpful techniques I have learned are taking breaks and quizzing myself. When I am tasked with a full day of studying or homework ahead of me, I will take a 5-minute break to do something else after every 30 minutes of working. This helps me stay focused for longer as well as retain the information better. Furthermore, when I am preparing for a test I will always have a friend quiz me when I feel that I am prepared. This is a great way to see where your weaknesses lie so that you can work on them.

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Zainee’s Answer

Studying requires mindfulness and focus. Approach it first thinking about potential distractions, ie, phone, emails, texts, environment etc.
Make some commitments on removing these distractions prior to your studying.

It also helps to go into your study session with reduced "brain chatter". Try a meditation - even if it's only a few minutes to reset and focus.
There are lots of free guided meditation that you can find online.

What works for some may not work for others so create an optimal studying environment that works for you.

I did like listening to background music when I was studying and have continued to do so in when in my work - however, I typically listen to music with no lyrics so it doesn't end up being a distraction!

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Courtney’s Answer

After transitioning from high school to college, you'll find yourself with a lot more free time (e.g., you probably won't be in classes from 7am - 3pm 5 days a week). Someone advised me to think of attending college as a full-time job (aka expect to dedicate about 8 hours / day to classes and studying). Of course your schedule can be much less structured than a straight 8-hour day, but going into the semester with the goal to set aside that much time for studies helped me stay on top of things versus putting it off until exam time!

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Van’s Answer

What has helped me personally....was classical music playing while I am studying. This helped my mind stay focus and was soothing. My best study method to learn materials is to write short hand notes and than go back and review my notes and add visuals or create flash cards. If I can write it down and see it and relate it to some kind of visual it is more ingrained in my mind. Definitely set aside time to go over your material to ensure you understand and not just memorize. Hope this helps and good luck!

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Vicki’s Answer

Whether or not listening to music helps you study really depends on you, your mood during that study session, the subject your studying and so many other factors. In terms of general study habits, the fewer interruptions/distractions the better if your solo studying.

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