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How difficult is it right out of college to get a job as a nurse?

Im planning on majoring in nursing in the fall and was wondering when I graduate how hard it would be do get a job. #nursing #nurse #healthcare #registered-nurses #hospital-and-health-care


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J’s Answer

This may vary greatly depending on the area you live. In Chicago, there is no nursing shortage and many nursing schools sending new grads out at the same time, competing for the same jobs. It's been the case where some new grads have gone a year before finding a job.
I graduated only a month ago and have manage to land a spot in a new grad program in an interesting unit. This was accomplished by understanding that I was one of many entering this field at roughly the same time and I had to set myself apart. I did this by starting applications early, early-mid April. This was to help me become familiar with the process, view what's out there, what any given hospital is looking for, and also blanket the system. I was open to what positions at what hospitals I would apply to. ICU or ER was ideal, but kept an open mind that units like tele were great stepping stones and have many things in common that will only help you if you should move onto a more critical area.
I also took the nclex as soon as I could. In Illinois, hospitals won't let you begin working, or won't consider you at all until your license number has posted. States vary, so you'll come to learn how it works where you live.
Also work on your LinkedIn profile to make it the best reflection of you. Add recruiters, classmates, and others.
Lastly, be nice to people. I mean it. This most definitely can impact your job outlook at every level, classmate, faculty, nursing staff at clinical...
I would never suggest being genial just because of what might be gained, but understand this can affect you professionally. Part of why I got my job is an acquaintance worked at the hospital and was close with the nurse recruiter, all unbeknownst to me. I didn't know she had known the recruiter or said anything about me at all until after my interview. She did not owe me this. My own merit had a lot to do with it, but it's silly to pretend those nice words of reference had no influence over the decision.


Take initiative and be kind. The job process really begins the second the program begins.


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Ana’s Answer

Not very hard at all. The nursing field is vast and employment opportunities are endless as a Med-surge nurse. Your best bet at an entry position would be with one of the clinical sites you worked at and hopefully developed a good rapport with. Make sure you take any certification available ( ACLS, PALS, etc) to set yourself apart from the competition and ask seasoned nurses to help you with your resume. Good luck!


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Anne Hallett’s Answer

Hi Jennifer,


It depends on the economy at the time. I graduated in 2008 right after the recession and it was harder to get a job as a new grad in bigger cities than it had been in the past. However, as the economy has recovered it is easier now to to get a job as a new graduate. You should have no problem getting a job in most places, except maybe the major hospitals in Boston or NYC.


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Angela’s Answer

Depends on the area you live in. Some areas have a shortage and it's much easier, other areas the opposite is true. It will be easier if you are able to move to where e jobs are if necessary

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Jennifer’s Answer

there is a shortage of nurses in our area. we have started the hiring process for quite a few new hire nurses as soon as they graduate.


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