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When you are at an interview what are basic questions you should ask?

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John’s Answer

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Great Question Kayla

BEST QUESTIONS IN AN INTERVIEW
So your resume got noticed and you’ve been asked to come in for a face-to-face interview—congratulations! But in order to shine during the interview and land that job offer, careful preparation beforehand is essential.

DO EXTENSIVE RESEARCH ON THE EMPLOYER
You should thoroughly research the company you are interviewing with, as you want to make sure you understand the business and anticipate the kinds of questions the interviewer may ask.

√ Review the company’s website (especially the “About Us,” “Team,” and “Products” sections).
√ Review press releases from the company.
√ Review the company’s LinkedIn page.
√ Research who will be Interviewing you.

ANTICIPATE THE QUESTIONS YOU'LL BE ASKED
It’s important to think early on about the questions you may be asked so that you can prepare an articulate and polished response. You don’t want to be caught off-guard by difficult questions.

√ What do you consider to be your greatest strength?
√ What do you know about our company?
√ What interests you about this job?
√ Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
√ Do you have any questions for me? (This were you want to sine!)

HOW TO INTERVIEW YOUR POTENTIAL EMPLOYER
Your destiny is in your hands. If you are going to take a job make sure that you understand what experience you will get and exactly how you will benefit. Insist that the company make a commitment to your development. Don’t work for a company that isn’t ready to understand and invest in your future. Asking questions is a great way to dig into the company culture and the specific day-to-day responsibilities of the job so that, should you be hired, your first week or so in the position won't be accompanied by any major surprises.

All Job titles were not created equal. Dig deep when it comes to the details of your potential position. Asking questions can also give you the opportunity to further highlight some of your qualities, skills, and experience, and show the employer why you're a terrific match for the job.

√ What are the biggest challenges of this job?
√ What is a typical career path for someone in this position?
√ Does the company have a health plan, 401(k)?
√ Does the company encourage, or even fund, continuing education?

GUIDELINES FOR ASKING QUESTIONS
While you don’t have to ask every question on the list above, having a few good questions ready will help you look like an informed and prepared candidate for the job. Here are some other things to keep in mind when preparing your own list of questions.

√ Avoid "Me" Questions: "Me" questions are those that put yourself ahead of the employer.
√ Don't get Personal: Establish a rapport with your interviewer, but... don't ask personal questions.
√ Ask One Question at a Time: Avoid multi-part questions, they will only overwhelm the employer.

Was this helpfull Kayla
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Jacquelyn’s Answer

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As an interviewee, you want to try to have 3 main points/themes to share your set of skills and help the interviewer tell your story after you leave the room. For example - you can share how you are communicative, able to build relationships and resourceful. With all of your responses try to highlight those points/themes consistently. You will have to practice this and have examples to emphasis these points/themes.

Additionally, I suggest asking "closing" or "assuming the role" type questions like:

"If (or when-- depending on the how the interview is going) I am chose for this position, what could I do in the first 90 days that would make you say I am a rock star (or great hire)?"

This question allows the interviewer to tell you what their expectations are for you coming on board in the first 90 days. Depending on what they mention, this is your opportunity to circle back and mention the skills that you have to help you complete those desired tasks.
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Dexter’s Answer

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Hi Kayla,

I wasn't sure if you were asking your question from the perspective of an interviewer or an interviewee.

If you're an interviewer, my favorite question of all time, and I use this regardless of hiring for an engineer or marketer or project manager, is https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20130117183637-15454-the-most-important-interview-question-of-all-time/. A lot of interviewees are ready to answer with the "right" answers for simple/basic questions, but with this question, you get really in-depth, so it ends up telling you a lot about who the interviewee is and how they work. Of course, you'll need other questions and I would tailor it for the role, but this is the one I always ask.

If you're the interviewee, I really like to ask about the team and the manager I'll be reporting to. I like to ask for examples of team interaction and about the management style of the hiring manager. To me, and to a lot of people, what makes a job fun or difficult is the relationship you have with your manager, so it's good to figure out who they are during the interview process.

Hope this helps!

--
Dexter

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Amy’s Answer

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Common questions asked in interviews that are used to depict a better picture of the potential employee are:
- Tell me about yourself. (works as an ice-breaker and allows space for fun facts as well as relevant facts)
- What is an area of weakness you have? (reveals the potential humility of a future employer & their drive to strengthen this weakness)
- List three things you love about yourself? (can how humility as well as self-confidence if answered in a balanced manner)
- Tell me about a time you failed either as a student, in a project, as an employer, etc and what did you do? (shows whether or not a person can deal with conflict/failure and resolve a tough situation).

Hope this helps!
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Andrea’s Answer

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Great question! Though I am not a HR professional, I've always found these to be some of the questions I get the best responses on:

- Describe the culture/values of the company
- What does success look like in this position, and how do you measure it?
- What do you see as the most challenging aspect of this job?
- What do you like best about working for this company?
- What are the next steps in the interview process? (always remember to ask this one)

Good luck!
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Colleen’s Answer

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You may have several interviews before you are offered the job, so you need to start by understanding the role of the person who is interviewing you, relevant to the job you are seeking. It is perfectly acceptable to ask the recruiter for some basic information on the interviewer in order for you to prepare you questions. Then based on the interviewers role you will know if you should ask administrative (recruiter, HR), tactical (direct manager) or strategic (business partner or other manager) questions.
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Bharat’s Answer

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It is another chance for you to show up your passion towards the job and company you are being interviewed for. Questions you ask tell more about you than the answers that you give to their questions. Your questions should focus more on understanding the company and the position. Another way of thinking for these questions is, suppose you are selected and you join the company what are the things that you would be interested to know.

What do you expect from this person?
Where does this job take me if I do an outstanding job?
How are the person with out-standing performances rewarded?
What do you believe someone must know to do this job well?
What are your recruiting preferences Within the company or outside the company?
Could you describe the people I would be working with?
How is the company organized? Would you draw me an organization chart?
How do you monitor performance?
What makes you different from your competition?
What are the biggest challenges confronting your company, and the industry?
In what ways do you expect the company to change?
How are employees trained? Who trains them?
If one does an outstanding job, how are they rewarded?
Who are your biggest competitors?
Do you personally make the final hiring decision? Do you consult with others? Who else do you consult with?
What do you like or dislike about some of the people who have worked for you in the past?
What challenges do people face working on same profile?
What kind of boss are you? Could you give me an example?
If you have gone thru the company profile and recent events, refer to one or 2 incidents and seek more details.

2 Useful tips for any Interview

a) Over 60% candidates are rejected who have little or no knowledge of the company

b) The number one most common mistake at a job interview is: failing to ask for the job.

This is the Time....
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Tiffany’s Answer

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This is a great question:

• What will my day to day responsibility’s be?
• How am I be measured on the work?
• What is the career path?
• What are the team dynamic?
• What is the biggest challenges with the job?
• What job skills are you looking for with this job? And see if you can take your current experience and relate it back to what they are looking for?
• What is the company culture
• Does the company benefits (health insurance, 401k ect.)

Also, it is always good if you can research the company to understand what they are about.
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Kathleen’s Answer

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Hi Kayla!
If you mean questions you should ask the interviewer (if you are the interviewee), a good question to ask is, "What is the workplace culture of your company?" This is a broad question on purpose, as it gives the interviewer a chance to talk about what trends they see in day-to-day and long-term operations of the company. As a job seeker, you will want to make sure you understand the workplace culture (for example, what's the schedule like? Does the company provide team-building or encourage professional development? What's the dress code like?). This question also shows that you're taking this opportunity seriously and are invested - and puts the interviewer on the spot - which may help you stand out compared to other applicants.
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Gina’s Answer

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A few questions I like to ask are geared more towards the dynamic of the company-- if you feel like the company is a good fit for you culturally, the more productive you will be and the more you will learn.
What is a typical day like?
What is the average tenure of current employees?
What are some daily challenges I might face?
How can I grow from this role?
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Toni’s Answer

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You should ask what challenges they are currently having and be prepared to give a response about how you would overcome that challenge.
Ask about their goals and be able to give a response on how you could contribute meeting that goal?
Ask what is there eta on making a decision
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Lavontell’s Answer

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Great question so many come to mind. I would say use the questions you ask to see if this company will be a great company fit for you.

-What made you decide to come work for this company?
_What is a typical day like at your company?
-What challenges may I face on a day to day basis?
-What type of leadership is held within this company?
-What growth and career advancement opportunities do you have?
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Veronica’s Answer

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Find out what the company's pillars are, i.e what they believe in and how they operate. It's always good to know what a company stands for and see if that aligns with your goals or beliefs as well!
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Hannah’s Answer

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I would steer away from asking any generic or basic interview questions and ask questions that shows the interviewer that you have done your research on the company and/or group. For instance, does the company's website reference any sort of big, ongoing initiatives? I would also do your research on the person who you are interviewing with, by looking them up on LinkedIn, the web for news articles, or on the company's website. They have an interesting career path that you could ask about. Last but certainly not least, if there are any genuine questions that you have about the position, team, or company you shouldn't be afraid to ask-- there are no dumb questions!
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Bharat’s Answer

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It is another chance for you to show up your passion towards the job and company you are being interviewed for. Questions you ask tell more about you than the answers that you give to their questions. Your questions should focus more on understanding the company and the position. Another way of thinking for these questions is, suppose you are selected and you join the company what are the things that you would be interested to know.

What do you expect from this person?
Where does this job take me if I do an outstanding job?
How are the person with out-standing performances rewarded?
What do you believe someone must know to do this job well?
What are your recruiting preferences Within the company or outside the company?
Could you describe the people I would be working with?
How is the company organized? Would you draw me an organization chart?
How do you monitor performance?
What makes you different from your competition?
What are the biggest challenges confronting your company, and the industry?
In what ways do you expect the company to change?
How are employees trained? Who trains them?
If one does an outstanding job, how are they rewarded?
Who are your biggest competitors?
Do you personally make the final hiring decision? Do you consult with others? Who else do you consult with?
What do you like or dislike about some of the people who have worked for you in the past?
What challenges do people face working on same profile?
What kind of boss are you? Could you give me an example?
If you have gone thru the company profile and recent events, refer to one or 2 incidents and seek more details.

2 Useful tips for any Interview

a) Over 60% candidates are rejected who have little or no knowledge of the company

b) The number one most common mistake at a job interview is: failing to ask for the job.

This is the Time....
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Syed’s Answer

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Hi Kayla,

You have to tailor questions for the interviewer according to the actual company or industry you're interviewing for. For example, if you were interviewing for a Ticket Sales position with the Dallas Mavericks:
1. What is an example of a successful Ticket Sales promotion in the past couple seasons?
2. How has the drafting of Luka Doncic impacted Ticket Sales?
3. What technology platforms do I need to be comfortable with to succeed in this job?
4. How will coronavirus impact ticket sales and buyer activity in the future?
5. What training and mentorship opportunities will I have access to?
6. Fun question: Are there any employee benefits for working for the team?
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