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What is the hardest part of getting to be and being a graduate with a Computer Science degree

I like to work hard and and i love technology
Im the type of person that doesn't like to wait for people to do things for me if i can do myself I'd rather do it myself .
#computer-science #technology


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Raya’s Answer

Hi Anthony
If you love technology and are willing to work, it may be a great option for you.
You will need to take math classes (typically beyond calculus) and the basics of physics. The most important knowledge you will need to gain is a solid understanding of logic and algorithms. Learning to be a good software engineer takes time and you need to be willing to listen to feedback and keep improving. Perhaps that is the hardest thing to get there.
Technology is changing really fast, so I think the hardest thing about being a professional software engineer is that your learning is never done - you have to be constantly picking up new skills, new languages, new frameworks.

A few additional tips:
1) tools are important. Take the time to really learn your SDE (software development environment) since it will help you be much faster and better coder.
2) comments are crucial. A code you wrote a year ago will be incomprehensible even to yourself without comments.
3) software is a team sport. It takes a large group of people to produce a successful product. Don't forget the soft skills - you will need them, I promise.

Best of luck!
Raya

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Natalie’s Answer

Hi Anthony.

I am currently a student majoring in computer science. I am close to getting my degree, and I would say that the hardest part about getting your degree is the gap between what you learn in class and industry experience. There is no way that you can learn everything you need to know to be successful as a computer scientist in a classroom setting.

I would recommend that you go above and beyond the material you learn in your classes. Lectures a couple times week is not enough practice to effectively master a programming language. You should try to create a GitHub account and work on individual projects so that when you apply to jobs after graduation, companies can take a look at what work that you have done. Try to get internships with different companies if you can to learn how to apply your skills to a goal and specific industry or look for volunteer opportunities across your community. There is always a need for someone who can code!

I would also say that most computer science environments at the university level are very individualized, without emphasis on collaboration, at least in my experience. What can really make you stand out is your ability to work with others on code and other projects related to your degree. The work environment is becoming more collaborative, and hundreds of people sometimes need to work together to get something working when it comes to successful code.

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Daniel’s Answer

Since you wrote "I like to work hard and and i love technology," it sounds like you already have the two of, in my opinion, the biggest hurdles in getting a degree for most students: discipline and motivation. However, given how many different classes a comp sci student must take, there's a good chance that some of them may be less interesting and less related to technology than you'd like. As others have mentioned, some of the requirements in the program (they're typically heavy on math) can be a drag, but it's very important to stay focused on your goal and graduate, preferably with as high a GPA as you're capable of to keep your options open.

What worries me a bit is that you wrote "Im the type of person that doesn't like to wait for people to do things for me if i can do myself I'd rather do it myself," because while in one respect it could be interpreted it as "I'm highly independent," it could also be interpreted as "I'm bad at collaboration." You will likely have group projects in university, and in the workforce there aren't that many positions that let you just do everything by yourself. Splitting up the work and playing nicely with others is quite important, at least in the long term. In some of my group projects, we all had to grade the others' performances, so don't be the person who goes rogue and makes everybody dislike them.

Other than that, the typical skills of time management, taking useful notes, reviewing the important stuff, realizing when to seek help, etc., which you've hopefully already learned in secondary school.

One thing I wanted to mention as an aside: during your university studies you'll want to not only graduate but also learn useful things. There are plenty of extra-curricular activities and research opportunities in which you can partake to get more out of the experience. Just don't overextend and do too much: make sure you're doing well enough to obtain high grades because, generally speaking, the degree is the safest way to get into the workforce for technology.

Once you've graduated, the IT job market nowadays is actually quite good, so I wouldn't say there's anything particularly difficult about "being a graduate with a Computer Science degree." Perhaps landing that first job takes a bit of patience, but you just need to be patient and prepare well for job interviews just like virtually everybody else.

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Ravindra’s Answer

Lured by the prospect of high-salary, high-status jobs, college students are rushing in record numbers to study computer science.

Now, if only they could get a seat in class.

On campuses across the country, from major state universities to small private colleges, the surge in student demand for computer science courses is far outstripping the supply of professors, as the tech industry snaps up talent. At some schools, the shortage is creating an undergraduate divide of computing haves and have-nots — potentially narrowing a path for some minority and female students to an industry that has struggled with diversity.

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Ravindra’s Answer

Lured by the prospect of high-salary, high-status jobs, college students are rushing in record numbers to study computer science.

Now, if only they could get a seat in class.

On campuses across the country, from major state universities to small private colleges, the surge in student demand for computer science courses is far outstripping the supply of professors, as the tech industry snaps up talent. At some schools, the shortage is creating an undergraduate divide of computing haves and have-nots — potentially narrowing a path for some minority and female students to an industry that has struggled with diversity.

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Michael’s Answer

Some difficulties of becoming/being a CS graduate that I've experienced... Hopefully this is helpful!

Becoming a CS graduate:
- More difficult classes (similar to other STEM students).
- Potentially more competition to get into the major if it is impacted at your school.
- It can be difficult to find your passion/specialty within the wide scope of Computer Science (Computer Vision, Artificial Intelligence, Human Computer Interaction, etc.).
- You may experience a lack of diversity in the CS field in general which can be discouraging for some.
- Your school's career center and counselors may not be able to give you advice for tech specific career questions.
- Sometimes you feel like you are simultaneously doing too much work and too little work... Sometimes you may feel imposter syndrome. There are many hard working and smart students that enter CS.

Being a CS graduate:
- Job interviewers like to see side projects on your resume, so depending on the role, you may need to do some hobby projects outside of classes/work to remain competitive.
- Preparing for a technical interview is like studying for a final!
- Depending on your role you may be expected to keep up with the latest technologies.
- In CS classes, you may learn a lot of theoretical knowledge, rather than practical skills that can be applied as a software developer. The industry may also be moving faster than your school's curriculum. You may need to fill this gap on your own.

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Stephanie’s Answer

In my opinion, the hardest part of achieving the Computer Science degree is all the extra Math work which needs to be mastered. Make enough time to study, take notes, and study your notes for a full and clear understanding. A lot of the advanced Math learned during the degree work really IS used in real-life, although that may not seem a reality, it is.

My suggestion for you currently is to try and be specific in the career goals you want and align it to your degree. I also enjoy having full control of my job tasks and do not like to depend on others as a requirement to get the job done. Luckily, you will learn a few different programming languages and with the right real-world application, you should be able to can automate some of the work to remove the need for others' input. Automation also increases accuracy and productivity, so WinWin!

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