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Hi, i am interested in being a nurse and is very lost on what is the pathway is in being a nurse. what school should i apply to?

I am an incoming senior and is getting ready for college application season. I also really want to go to a four year, specially a UC. i am an honor student and have experience in volunteering and leadership. nursing nurse college registered-nurses healthcare college

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John’s Answer

QuynhTien there is more than one path you can take to become a licensed, registered nurse. The different options of schooling for registered nurses can take from 2-4 years, but it can be worthwhile since the RN field is estimated to grow much faster than the national average in the near future.

EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTERED NURSES

Registered nurses (RNs) are healthcare professionals who care for patients and educate them about their health conditions. Becoming an RN requires the completion of a postsecondary program, usually an associate or bachelor's degree, although a few hospitals have teaching programs that offer diplomas. Aspiring nurses learn about topics such as anatomy and human development and gain extensive supervised clinical experience. Nurses also must be licensed in their states, which requires passing an exam.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING
Aspiring registered nurses may choose to gain more comprehensive training by earning a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN). These degree programs are particularly beneficial to students who wish to pursue clinical or administrative positions. Offered at colleges and universities, BSN programs typically take four years to complete; however, students who are already licensed as RNs may be able to complete accelerated programs. BSN programs focus on more advanced nursing methodology and clinical training, compared to lower-level degree programs. They also equip students with the administrative and critical thinking skills necessary for advanced positions in the field.

LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTER NURES
To practice in the profession, registered nurses must become licensed. While licensure requirements vary according to state, they typically include passage of a state-approved training program and the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Administered by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing, the NCLEX-RN covers topics like psychosocial and physiological integrity, health promotion and infection control. Depending on the state, RNs may be required to meet additional licensure requirements.

SALARY AND JOB OUTLOOK FOR REGISTER NURES
The BLS estimated a 15% job growth for RNs across the country in the years 2020-2030. RNs must be flexible and able to work irregular schedules, as well as on weekends and holidays due to staffing and census fluctuations. Those who are employed in hospitals and nursing care facilities typically work around the clock, usually on rotating shifts. They might also be on call when they're not actually on duty, ready and able to report to work on short notice in emergencies. Nurses who work in physicians' offices and schools tend to have much more regular hours. RNs must be flexible and able to work irregular schedules, as well as on weekends and holidays due to staffing and census fluctuations. Those who are employed in hospitals and nursing care facilities typically work around the clock, usually on rotating shifts. They might also be on call when they're not actually on duty, ready and able to report to work on short notice in emergencies. The average salary for a Registered Nurse (RN) in the United States is between $57,220 and $102,020 as of June 28, 2020. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on the actual Registered Nurse (RN) position. Nurses may have specialized skills and training required to care for different populations of patients for example pediatrics, critical care, cardiology, or surgery.

Hope this was Helpful QuynhTien

thank you so much! that definitely gave me more insight on the career and how I can get there. QuynhTien D.

You are welcome QuynhTien, it was my Pleasure. Believe you can and you’re halfway there. – Theodore Roosevelt John Frick

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Darci’s Answer

Hi! I also knew I wanted to be a nurse when I was in high school. I recommend applying to a bachelor’s degree program for nursing (BSN). Most hospitals prefer a BSN, or require you to obtain it within a certain amount of years after hiring. A lot of nurses start out in a Med/Surg Unit to learn time management, organization, documentation, medication administration, and to become familiar with IV skills, patient care, and common equipment used. I started in pediatrics (children), that is my love. Then, I moved onto the operating room and cardiac operation. Now I work from home in another field of nursing. This is one of the BEST fields to get into. You will find out so much about yourself and people in general. You will be the go-to person among family and friends when they have health questions and concerns. It’s rewarding, hard work, long hours, well paying, and again REWARDING!! You can do it, the program is challenging but if you put your all into it, it’s worth it. Best of luck to all ☺️
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Lacee’s Answer

Hi there! I am a RN, BSN. I also have my MBA and a certification in Case Management (CCM). I knew since my junior year of high school that I wanted to be a RN. Here's the advice I have:

1. Consider earning your ASN so you can work while you go for your BSN. There are many online BSN programs that you can take. A few benefits are financial, on the job training (which will help with your BSN), and several BSN programs are 18 months or so.

2. Use clinicals to evaluate your interests. I found myself on a Med-Surg floor after graduation and very much disliked it. I wish I had been more aggressive about clinicals and opportunities so I could have explored more options. I ended up landing in Case Management (LOVE it!).

3. Being a nurse is so rewarding--hang in there when the program is tough because it is worth it. I will never forget my pinning. It was truly such a gift and accomplishment.

4. Nursing is such a diverse field. I started in Med-Surg and now I am in the payer space leading a team of nurses and working from home.

Good luck in your endeavors!

Lacee recommends the following next steps:

Research schools that will best fit your interests
Consider earning ASN so you can work while earning your BSN
Choose a school with a large clinical program so you have more opportunity
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victoria’s Answer

If you have the opportunity to attend a 4 year university and obtain a BSN (bachelor) I would recommend this route. Many employers are requiring a BSN before the will hire you. When i graduated, if one did not have a bachelor degree in nursing you were limited to nursing homes primarily.

If the financial cost of school is of concern, you can do a 2 year Associate program and once completed, work while taking your Bachelor.
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