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How do you work with difficult co-workers?


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John’s Answer

How to Deal with a Co-worker who Drives You Up the Wall

If you feel completely at peace with who you are, then another person’s quirks should simply be amusing or, at worst, a bit aggravating—not maddening, and certainly not consuming. So be honest with yourself about why Braggy Obnoxious bothers you. You don’t have to tell anyone else about it, but you need to understand it. Reacting poorly to a person’s arrogance won’t change anything about it. In fact, if your arrogant colleague—or any problematic colleague, for that matter—figures out how to push your buttons, you’ve handed over some of your power. If that person is both arrogant and evil, he just might use that knowledge to antagonize you and then sit back and watch you combust. Then you end up looking like the jerk, while your colleague continues being as arrogant as ever. Instead of reacting, strive to understand why a person gets to you so much, which can help you regain control and refocus your energy.

First, let’s talk about you. It’s one thing to be occasionally annoyed or aggravated by an arrogant co-worker. As long as it’s not frequent and isn’t disrupting your life, you don’t need to be too concerned. It’s another thing, though, to become increasingly agitated or absolutely consumed with frustration and anger. If you have trouble concentrating, lose sleep, or find yourself complaining frequently and vehemently about the offending co-worker, you have to figure out how to overcome your feelings before you’re a wreck. Are you jealous that he’s getting recognition for something he did really well? Then it’s time to focus on all the things you are doing well and learn how to promote those things, so that you, too, get noticed for your amazing work. Did she network like a rock star at a recent office party, while you communed with the wallpaper? Well, then it’s time to figure out how to build your network in a way that fits your personality. So here’s a hard truth: When someone really gets under your skin, it’s not usually the person who’s the problem. Most likely, those feelings are a reflection of something about you. Maybe you’re actually a bit jealous of something your colleague has accomplished, or you feel insecure about your productivity compared to your colleague.

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Bill’s Answer

As a Chef you want to build a team. In doing this it will take a variety of people from different backgrounds. All can and should be an asset to your team. As Chef Michael said everyone must feel they are respected and valued. The rules/code of conduct must be consistently applied equally. Team members will have different goals in their position. Some will be happy in their role for many years and others are trying to make their way up through the ranks. Team members will be motivated in different ways. It is our job to provide an environment where everyone feels their contribution/work is important to the teams success. You lead by example. You must follow the same set of rules as your team members. When a team member is having a problem use it as a coaching moment. If it is professionally centered then you can help with more training. Some times a team members performance is affected by an external problem. If that is the case, then assist them in finding the appropriate professional to help them. In any case, if you notice a team members performance has declined or is causing conflict with in the team, do not ignore the situation. The team/family we build will be the foundation for success. Give them as much passion/commitment as you do to the other responsibilities of your job. Lastly from time to time you will hire someone that just does not fit. Make an fair/honest assessment. If the new team member can not follow the rules or perform at the level required, do not keep them on the team.

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Scott’s Answer

Every where you go there will always be that person. You need to figure out why. Are they trying to better your performance?
Or are the trying to get out of work.
Watch how they interact with others. If the act in a manner that is the way you want, ask that person why.
Don't be a punching bag. Standup for yourself. This isn't school any more.
Remember they are getting paid the same and may resent you if you do less

Scott recommends the following next steps:

Talk to that person. See ehat their behavior is trying to accomplish
Speak to co. Workers
Speak to that person with manager present.

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Michael’s Answer

Managing a kitchen and service crew is always challenging. But the key to be successful is straight forward. First, be respectful. Everyone is important to the team and no one is more important than anyone else. Second. Catch people doing things right. If you want to get people to work WITH you then make sure they know how much you appreciate all the things they do right. Third. Teach. Teach and teach. A good Chef is always teaching their crew. Fourth. Be inclusive. Let your crew be part of the solutions and let them be creative cooks. Everyone has something to offer. Listening and caring will allow the team to work as one. Finally, remember that the crew, both BOH and FOH are the most important people in your life at that time. You'll spend more time with them then your own family.
Make sure they know how important they are to you and the team.
This is the kind of kitchen environment you WANT to be part of.

Chef Michael Tsonton

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Robert’s Answer

Hi Jessica,

so to answer your question if the co workers are hard to handle,
I believe that if you treat people with respect, show them that you are not afraid to do the jobs they do, then they will give respect to you, and be good solid workers for you

chef robert

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Blake’s Answer

Hey Jessica,

Every job will have certain employees that are more difficult than others. The only thing that you can control is how you treat others and treat them with respect.

Thanks,
Blake

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Bill’s Answer

As a Chef you want to build a team. In doing this it will take a variety of people from different backgrounds. All can and should be an asset to your team. As Chef Michael said everyone must feel they are respected and valued. The rules/code of conduct must be consistently applied equally. Team members will have different goals in their position. Some will be happy in their role for many years and others are trying to make their way up through the ranks. Team members will be motivated in different ways. It is our job to provide an environment where everyone feels their contribution/work is important to the teams success. You lead by example. You must follow the same set of rules as your team members. When a team member is having a problem use it as a coaching moment. If it is professionally centered then you can help with more training. Some times a team members performance is affected by an external problem. If that is the case, then assist them in finding the appropriate professional to help them. In any case, if you notice a team members performance has declined or is causing conflict with in the team, do not ignore the situation. The team/family we build will be the foundation for success. Give them as much passion/commitment as you do to the other responsibilities of your job. Lastly from time to time you will hire someone that just does not fit. Make an fair/honest assessment. If the new team member can not follow the rules or perform at the level required, do not keep them on the team.

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Blake’s Answer

Hey Jessica,

Every job will have certain employees that are more difficult than others. The only thing that you can control is how you treat others and treat them with respect.

Thanks,
Blake

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