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What's it like working in a hospital?

#doctor #nurse #medical

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Estelle’s Answer

Most hospitals are divided into specific departments, so you can develop a close group of friends with common interests. I am a gynecologic surgeon, so I perform surgeries at the hospital then take care of patients on the med/surgery floor postoperatively. I have the opportunity to see lots of staff members who are really good friends help each other out and make a great healthcare team. Usually, hospitals have great benefits and reasonable schedules for their employees.
Hope this helps!
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Blake’s Answer

Hey Jessica,

Working in a hospital can be very hectic, but overall there is good organization.

Thanks,
Blake
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Tia’s Answer

Working in the hospital is not too bad. Your work schedule is setup in 4-6 weeks block so you kinda know what you are working lets say 2 weeks from now. I enjoyed the teamwork with my previous inpatient team. Typical shift was 7am-3:30pm, 10:30-7pm, or 3-11:30pm (as well as midnight shift 10pm-7am; usually had specific team members who would do this shift). It was not bad at all and it was all about the patient care aspect!
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Sarah’s Answer

It's wonderful overall. Most of the time you work 3 times a week, 12-14 hour shifts. You need comfy shoes! Less people work at night and it's generally less busy. It depends on what job you have to give accurate information. But know that a hospital job usually doesn't have a structured schedule during your shift. You may have 4 patients one day, 14 the next. Emergencies happen. It's different each shift so you'll probably not get bored easily. Sometimes it's stressful and there's more to do than any one person can do. But it's very fulfilling if you enjoy giving good patient care and want to make a difference in the lives of others who are in need, and probably in pain.
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Tequila’s Answer

Hi Jessica. Working in a hospital has positives and negatives. The main positive for me is having the necessary resources to call upon if needed. I always felt supported from leadership to immediate supervisors to colleagues. The main negative is that you typically see people at their worst, emotionally and physically. I get it as a profession, but doesn't mean I like it as a person. I'm always a respectful person, even when I'm sick, irritated, or "hangry" (due to low sugar, LOL). But so many people think that they can speak to people who are there to help them, in any manner they please. They get angry with others because they got themselves into a predicament. They are downright disrespectful towards another human being because they know we will be professional, we are taught to think about that person's "possible" situation or express empathy in all situations.
Another positive of working in a hospital is realizing how your learning curve constantly is improving. I learned so much working in a hospital about US healthcare. I always ask questions and never think my question is stupid. I'm talking about asking questions from everyone in a hospital. From asking a maintenance person how they like some aspect of their job to asking a colleague a questions. I'm not shy and I find it helps to learn if I ask someone doing the job. Talking to leadership and supervisors is another way for me to learn about why things are told to us. Most of the times, changes happen because something went wrong or regulatory agencies dictate to the hospital. Because supervisors and leadership are always walking around, I'm able to ask questions which help me better understand changes as they occur. Being able to do that has taught me how hospitals operate. This helped me in my career advancements and help me be able to address patients with facts and not speculation on issues.
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