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What carreer is best for me?

I have no clue what I want to grow up to be. #career-choice

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Subject: Career question for you

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Crystal’s Answer

It's ok to not know what you want to grow up to be because life is a learning process and you don't have to just stick to one career all your life. With that qualification, here are some tips to helping guide your career decisions:




Crystal recommends the following next steps:

1. Try different careers through careers, shadowing, talking with people in various careers. While trying out different experiences, figure out what you like and don't like
2. Try to identify what kind of lifestyle you want to have as an adult and what kind of sacrifices you would be willing to make for different career paths
3. There's a japanese concept called ikigai, which is a way to find purpose in your life. Think about each category and what you prioritize.
4. Journal and reflect after every experience
5. Use your school experience to identify what you like to learn , do, and why
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Doc’s Answer

Trenton choosing a career is one of those momentous decisions that can change the course of your life. Such an important decision deserves considerable time and introspection. Ample information and self-examination can help you choose a satisfying career that you will enjoy for years to come.

1) EVALUATE YOUR WORK STYLE
The right career for you will be suited to your work style. Are you a self-starter who accomplishes goals on your own, or do you need the discipline of a structured work environment to do your best? An honest evaluation of your work style will help you decide whether a career where you work independently is right for you. No matter how much you like a job description, it’s important to be aware that the industry you’re in and the company you work at play a large role in your happiness. Spend some time finding out about various relevant industries, as well as which companies have the kind of projects and ethos you’re looking for.

2) KNOW YOUR TALENTS
Research the occupations that appeal to you most. Use online and educational resources to learn more about each profession. Although a quick Google search will most likely give you some basic information, it can be helpful to visit professional organizations’ websites for further insights. In addition, you could find out who the thought leaders are in each field and look for articles, interviews and videos featuring them. Finally, narrow your list down to one occupation you want to pursue.

3) CREATE FINANCIAL GOALS
One of your goals should be to choose a career where you can earn enough money to meet your financial goals. If you want to own a vacation home on every continent and fly to these homes on your private jet, a career as a retail clerk will probably not help you achieve your goals. You may have to make some compromises along the way, but generally speaking, the career you choose should allow you to meet your financial goals.

4) KNOW BEFORE YOU GO
Before you pay – or, worse, borrow money – for college or graduate school, make sure the career you choose is worth the expense. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, the cost of an undergraduate college education rose 25 to 37 percent between 2010 and 2020. If you need to go back to school to qualify for your dream job, look into programs that repay your student loans if you work in a public service position for a few years after graduation.

5) SEE YOU IN 30 YEARS
You'll spend one-third of your life with the people you work with, so choose a career that's a good social fit. If you're a loner who doesn't enjoy social interaction, you may be well-suited to a career where you work independently or work from home. If you love to meet new people, you may find a career in sales fulfilling, where you work with the public.

6) CONDUCT INFORMATIONAL INTERVIEWS
A 15-minute informational interview with someone who has a job you think you want can help cement your career choice. Many people will be happy to meet briefly with you to talk about the pros and cons of what they do and tell you whether they would make the same career choice if they could turn back time and choose differently. Start and end the meeting on time, ask probing questions and listen carefully to the answers.

7) USE SELF-ASSESSMENT TOOLS
Use do-it-yourself resources to help you narrow your career choices. Take online quizzes to help you assess your aptitude for certain types of work. Review online job descriptions and career information from the Bureau of Labor Statistics to help you understand what the education and training requirements are for different kinds of jobs. Many books and workbooks are also available to guide you through the self-assessment process.

8) HIRE A CAREER COACH
If do-it-yourself tools aren't right for you, a professional career coach can help you measure your aptitude for success in different professions and navigate your transition from the job you have now toward your dream job. A recruiter can help you find jobs that are a good match for your skills and preferences while still taking your experience into account. Moreover, recruiters hear about jobs before they’re posted on job boards and can help get your resume on the right desks.

9) GET REAL-LIFE EXPERIANCE
Follow the example of companies that use interns and temps to evaluate an individual before they extend a job offer. Real-life experience in the work environment where you think you want to work can help you make up your mind for certain. Job shadows, internships and temporary assignments give you a realistic view of a day in the life of a profession.

10) BE PATIENT
Finding the right career is a process, not an event. An entry level position in your field may not be your dream job, but it can give you a foothold on the career ladder you want to climb. It takes time to develop your career, but setting goals and following a plan to achieve them can help you fulfill your career aspirations.

Trenton when you’re passionate about what you want to do for the rest of your working life, the time and energy you invest now are nothing short of an investment in your professional and personal happiness.
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Holly’s Answer

Hey Trenton!

Choosing a path can be daunting... but just know whatever you choose doesn't have to be your forever job. I don't know what grade you're in, but just know that whatever you choose in college doesn't define what you will do in your eventual career. Lots of people choose a career path but end up switching mid way through.

Here are things you can consider around careers:

- What do you enjoy doing in your spare time?
- What are your values and how can the career you choose line up with your life values?
- What type of topics energize you?
- Do you like working with others?
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Helen’s Answer

Find your passion!! Many times people jump into a career because of the pay or the benefits and end up miserable in the job. Do not spend time at a job that you hate. It isn't fair to you or your employer. If you love animals go into a career where animals are the focus. If you love working with people find a job that puts you in the public view. If you hate math... don't become an accountant!!

In order to find the career that is right fit for you, you must first get in touch with your 4 P's – passion, personality, preferences (for work pace, type of work, work environment, etc.), and principles (to learn more about these things, take self-assessments such as: What is Your Leadership Personality?).

Helen recommends the following next steps:

There are a lot of great books on the market that will help you in deciding where your career aptitude lies -- look up "What Color is Your Parachute" by Richard Bolles
This link is a great resource to get some free info and services - https://www.careerfitter.com/free_test/careerbuilder
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Cara’s Answer

Hi Trenton,

Great question! I know that feeling and it can feel daunting. The great thing is that there are many different jobs/careers in the world that you might not know about and learn about in school. Let's break it down into pieces and see what works best for you. Below are a few things I recommend you to do:

1). Write down things that match your personality. Do you like structure/routine or are you more entrepreneurial? Do you like being active during your day? Are you an introvert or an extrovert?

2). What classes do you like and not like in school? What qualities do you like in these courses? What don't you like?

3). Talk to family/friends/neighbors about these strengths and qualities that work for you.

4). Research these different fields and see what the field is like.

5). Shadow people in these field to see if you like anything about the field.

Remember, as your explore career paths, it's all about learning and it'll be a process. If you learn that you don't like something then that's as much as a learning experience as learning that you do like something.

Good luck!
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Victor’s Answer

Choose a career in something you are good at. If you do this, you will most likely do very well and enjoy doing it. A lot of people
choose careers they think will be good for them because of how it pays on average and how much demand there is (how easy it will
be to get hired). Problem there is, if they aren't good at it, they won't do well and therefore won't make a lot of money and will
have a hard time getting hired. Even worse, they don't enjoy it, meaning they are unhappy most days. Pick something you enjoy
and are somewhat decent at, you will do very well and actually have some fun too!
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Valerie’s Answer

This is a really hard decision, luckily you don't have to decide until after your first year of college, and then you can even still change your mind. To get an idea of what you might want to do you have to see what you like and don't like. Do you like health class (maybe a doctor or nurse), do you like math (maybe finance or accountant), do you love art class (an artist or interior designer). There are TONS of options. A great test That helped me know that I wanted to be in the medical field was an aptitude test ( https://www.princetonreview.com/quiz/career-quiz ). Best of luck. Always try out options too to see what you like or don't like.
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Anthony’s Answer

Hello Trenton,

I am happy to help answer your question! I am currently a 2nd-year graduate student but I, myself, have struggled with this question. When I was preparing to go to college, I found myself researching all kinds of career paths, because every day I thought I wanted to be something different. What I eventually realized was I was focusing on how much money I would be making, and allowing that to influence my career interests. Therefore, the first piece of advice I would give you is to put the money aside and take the time to figure out what you are most passionate about. Industry professionals will always tell you that if you are passionate about the work you are doing it will never feel like work and you will have a fun and rewarding career. Ultimately, over time, the money will come as you move up in rank or with a specific organization.

When trying to figure out what you are most passionate about, really think about what you have enjoyed doing most growing up. For example, sports have always been a huge part of my life, as I competed in them from elementary school all the way up through college. Therefore, I have chosen to pursue a career within sports. For you, there might be a passion in drawing or arts, and so you may want to consider being an interior designer architect, cartoonist, etc. As you can see, there are a wide variety of careers that relate to any area of interests, which is why this is the most important thing to determine.

Additionally, once you feel you have found a career of interest, look for opportunities to volunteer and/or intern with companies in the field. This is another great way to determine what you are interested in and get a good glimpse into what certain careers involve. It is very easy to say that you are passionate about something and want to work in the field, but once you get started you find out you really don't like it. Building off of my previous example, there are a ton of people who say they are passionate about sports and want to work in the industry. However, once they get in and realize the long hours and low pay that is involved, they quickly find a way to get out. In the end, completing multiple internships or serving as a volunteer with several companies can give you great insight into a career field that you may be interested in.
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Gloria’s Answer

Hi Trenton,

You have gotten a lot of great information from others here. I just want to add some thoughts.

The only person who really knows the answer to that is you. I would ask you - what are you passionate about? What would you do even if you weren't paid to do it? I would begin there. You should consider what skills you already have and love and find jobs that help you use your skills. For example, I have written from the moment that I could write. That had to be a key element of a career for me to find my dream job. I actually do write for a living, but it took me a little bit of searching. That may mean just taking a job to see if you would like it.

I would also recommend volunteering in any capacity that you can. Volunteering at its core is about helping others, not gain anything for yourself. However, you can gain skills from any volunteering that you choose to engage in. Sometimes you will learn that you are not good at something. I did that volunteering to create a garden, Sometimes you will learn that you can climb that 12-foot ladder and paint a ceiling without falling. I believe that challenging yourself with things that you do not know makes you a better person. You might even find a new hobby or even a new career.

Good luck on your search for a career.

Gloria

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Bill’s Answer

Trenton,

Choosing a career can be extremely difficult, however it may not be a NOW question that must be answered. Just as you have chosen topics of interest in school, you should attempt many different jobs of interest to find an aptitude which you have a passion to pursue. You will spend a lifetime in your chosen field and therefore you must love what you choose. Find Passion in your work and it will be happy man.

Best of luck in your future pursuit.

Bill
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