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how can i get a job at 16


Hi! I just want to let you know that the circumstances for jobs are a bit tougher now, but there is lots of hope! You want to look at different factors and ask yourself what do you want to do? What may you be good at? Then you can think about logistics, such as location, how much they pay, and other important considerations! Most people at a young age start with retail and go on from there. Different states are reopening their malls and other shopping centers, so you can look into clothing, food and more stores. There are also different programs that provide opportunities for young adults like in NYC there's SYEP and sometimes it goes year-round. Stefania E.

Stefania E. thank you tytiania S.

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Thomas’s Answer

(For the purposes of this answer, let's assume that you are able to get out and about in the middle of this pandemic)
One of the best ways to get a job (at 16 or at any age) is to ask people you know.
First, try to decide what kind of job you want. Do you want to work at a store? At a restaurant? In an office? Your options are somewhat limited at 16, since you'll probably be working part-time and people are often looking for someone with experience and maturity, and they might not be expecting that from a 16-year-old. However, there are options (I know, because my 16-year-old had a job before the pandemic struck).
Once you know what kind of job you want (or even if you're pretty much willing to take whatever job you can find), talk to everybody you know. Do any of your friends have jobs? Ask if their bosses are hiring. Do your parents (or older relatives, or the parents of your friends )know anybody who runs a local business? Would they be willing to put in a good word for you? Teachers or guidance counselors at your school might know of job openings, and many schools keep lists of job openings for students, including possible internships that can help you get school credit while your working. Whether it's friends, parents, teachers, or other people, let all of these people know that you are looking for a job and would appreciate any advice or help they might have.
Another way, of course, is to look in the newspaper (or online newspaper) at the classified ads, where you might find a reasonable job.
Finally (and there are other ways too, but so as not to go on too long...) walk down the main street or around the mall near where you live, looking for "Help Wanted" signs in stores where you might want to work. If the sign is there (and even if it isn't), you can walk in and ask the manager if they are hiring and if you can apply for a job. Many managers will appreciate the initiative you've taken, and you could come up with a job offer that way.
Good luck with your search!

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John’s Answer

Before you start looking for a job, it is important to take some time to decide what you want to do. Even though you may not have experience, there are a variety of positions available for teens. Before you even think about submitting your resume to a prospective employer, you have got a lot of work to do. You'll need to tailor your resume to the job, reconnect with your references, come up with keywords to help you hone your search, create some business cards, and so much more.

EXPLORE YOUR OPTIONS
Consider what you would like to do for a job. For example, if you love animals, check with local veterinarians to see if they are hiring. If you'd prefer working with children, check with your local YMCA (many have after-school child care programs and summer camps) or child care centers. Fast food restaurants and retail establishments rely on workers without experience and are willing to train new employees. It's not enough to search for an entry-level job. To find the right job for you — and to increase your chances of scoring an interview — you have to employ some job search strategies. For example, did you know that Monday is the best day of the week to look for a job? Or that you should always schedule interviews for the morning? These tips and tricks will get you in the door and get you your first job.

ONLINE JOB SEARCHING
Start your online job search by visiting the sites that focus on teen job opportunities. Searching Snagajob.com, for example, by type of position and location will generate a list of openings. There's also a list of national employers that hire part-time workers. Employers in fields like retail and hospitality often are very interested in hiring teens and are willing to provide training. Search by the category of employment you're interested in. This will generate some more leads. These types of employers often don't advertise, so check with the stores or restaurants in your town to see if they have openings.

There are good jobs for teens, and there are not-so-good and even awful jobs for teens. Before you say "yes" to a job offer, make sure the company is legitimate. Check with the Better Business Bureau to see if there have been complaints. Be aware that the Department of Labor has rules and regulations about when teens can, and can't work, as well as what type of job you can do. Make sure the employer is complying with the law. Decide whether this is a job you really want to do. Don't accept it if you don't feel comfortable with the work, with the environment, or with the boss or other employees. If this doesn't work out, there will be another offer. Consider whether the hours will fit into your school and activity schedule.

Last, but certainly not least, don’t forget to take care of yourself during this trying time. Finding a new job is stressful — doubly so when you’re in a rush. So take some time to meditate, exercise, listen to your favorite album, or whatever else it is that helps you unwind — and make sure to find a support network as well. Look to family and trusted friends for support so you can effectively make your way to a new job and find what you want/need.

Hope this was Helpful Tytiania

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david’s Answer

Join the Army Reserves and get a head start on people

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Logan’s Answer

I would explore jobs that align with your interests, as these are the jobs you will be most successful and motivated at. I used to love anything with a motor and being outside, so I started mowing lawns at age 12. My single client blossomed into 15 clients in 5 years with great pay. In addition, I was fascinated with cars so I started detailing cars on the side as well. That side hustle turned into steady stream of clients with excellent pay. All of these jobs built foundational skills that have proven extremely valuable in my current career.

Good luck!

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Ben’s Answer

Small businesses often hire students still in high school. I would recommend reaching out to local small businesses asking them if they need help. You’re more likely to get a response from a local small business than you are from a larger company as the decision makers are often in charge of handling communications on email, Facebook, Instagram and of course phone.

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Sydney’s Answer

Be prepared to take jobs sweeping floors or answering phones, but it is possible to get a job at 16. Look for jobs in restaurants, Starbucks, Dunkin, Krispy Kreme, etc. These are all ready to take people who have no work experience but are looking to make some money. They will also be flexible with schedules, knowing you are still in high school. Call or visit the location yourself (do not have your parents do it). This will show your dedication to the job and they will take you more seriously.

Good luck!

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EJ’s Answer

Hello, Tytiania

I would recommend you to start with your school. I assume you're attending high school and high schools offers intern or work program.
I had a high school students as an intern at the retail pharmacy and he got the position via his high school.
Also your school can provide information about state regulations.
Do you know which field you're interested or where do you want to work?
If you're interested in making money, then retail stores might be a good starting point.
If you're looking for intern program for your future career, check with community centers or industry you're interested in.
Many hospitals or retail pharmacy have intern program for 16 years old and these experience will be helpful in the future if you're interested in career in medicine.
You can drop by information center in a hospital or go to nearest local pharmacy and ask if they offer a position.
They will direct you to a person who is in charge of hiring.

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