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am i cut out for music?

I love music and i have always loved music since I was a little girl. So I joined the band in the 6th grade and enjoyed it until now. Now it's so technical which i'm not used too. For these past few years in concert band i have been naturally flowing with the music without sub-dividing rhythms or even keeping time. I've just naturally know how the rhythm goes and when to stop and start. im currently failing band and ive recently decided to drop out for the next semester. i really want to have a career as a musician because it's my passion but am i meant to do it? #music #musician #music-industry #music-industry #music-performance #vocalist

Thank you comment icon To be as direct and honest as possible.... If music is your passion, don't EVER give that up. You in all likelihood be introduced into the industry in a way you never predicted or imagined. But, I promise you that if you are honest, passionate and humble within this industry you will go far. It may not be the path you predicted, which is fine as long as you accept that. Because you will end up exactly where you belong in this family so long is you keep pushing and do the things I mentioned above 馃挴 Tyler Keenan
Thank you comment icon man music classes really limit you if you want to learn music theory go ahead but I strongly believe music can be learned but not taught Damian

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Subject: Career question for you

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Ragon鈥檚 Answer

Subdividing can be a hard skill to master. But it is important and worth it. Be patient with yourself because everyone learns at different rates.
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Daniel鈥檚 Answer

I had the same experience, I had studied music informally for many years, and once I got serious about it, I realized I had many things missing that I needed to work on, probably twice as hard as if I had begun it all together since the beginning, good sight reading, time keeping, solfege, etc. So everything was so frustrating , but once I started to work on those things I was able to connect to my initial more intuitive type of education, and it was great. Sometimes old habits die hard, but it's important to try to work on them. I believe having music intuition at the end of the day is more important than the formal education. If you have intuition and add the other tools on top of it, you'll be a greater musician overall, you'll be able to communicate better with other musicians and you'll get to play with better musicians as well. Bottom line, you'll improve, you'll be fine, you just have to be patient

Daniel recommends the following next steps:

make a list of your skills and your deficiencies, it's important remind yourself about both
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Kevin鈥檚 Answer

Hi. Although it can be trying to comprehend the subdivisions of rhythm.... don't stop now! I played drums for 7 years before I learned how to read while attending Musicians Institute in Hollywood California class of 1986. It is well worth the time involved to do so. Keep the forward motion and play on!!! Best wishes from Nashville Tennessee. :)
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Paul鈥檚 Answer

Hi Jayla. Sounds like you've hit a plateau in your talent. That's completely normal and natural, but you need to understand what's going on to know where to go from here.

By a plateau, I mean you've basically been able to excel with your natural ability, without having to work too hard at it. I had many fellow students with a ton of natural talent, who ended up dropping out of music for this same reason. When they had to work at it, it became less enjoyable. Or they let their own thinking limit their ability to go further. So even though I had little talent for performing, I got a music degree with honors.

It sounds like it's the same for you. Your natural abilities have gotten you this far with very little effort, but now you've reached a point where it's not enough. I'm guessTo continue growing, it's going to require more work on your part - actual studying and practicing. Things like learning your scales, key signatures, reading music, etc., can be a real pain to study. But once you begin to master them, they will come more quickly and more easily over time.

If you've ever noticed, performers are usually referred to as "practicing musicians." That's because you are never done mastering your instrument. The key in music - but any field, really - is to never stop learning! There is always more to know!

As for a long-term career in music, that's another story entirely. There are a number of ways to work as a musician, and they don't all involve performing. Have you ever tried writing music? Composers are always in need, and an excellent complement to performing. What about recording, arranging, or studio musician? These are all highly niche fields - the number of people doing it are very few, but can do very well if you take the right steps.

I might suggest scheduling an audition with a professor from a local college for your instrument. They may be able to evaluate your potential, and give you some ideas about whether you should pursue it as a career. It's certainly not for everyone, and not everyone who pursues it succeeds at it. It's a lot to think about.
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Suzanne鈥檚 Answer

Hi Jayla,
There are some people who are really strongly inclined toward one career or another. They simply have natural aptitudes such as strong language skills, art skills, music skills. Some people are gifted with incredibly beautiful natural singing voices. That leaves the rest of us. We just have to work hard.

My name is Sue and I am a retired registered nurse. But I started my work life as a musician. I studies piano and church organ in college. I had some musical aptitude and like you could wing a lot of stuff. I wasn't given any special gifts. When I was playing my best, I practiced up to 8 hours a day. Every day. My life situation changed and I changed my career to nursing. I studied hard for that career as well and it was so worth it.

If you like music, and you enjoy band, I would encourage you to speak to your band director. See what can be worked out. Music is an art and there is a lot of human emotion and feeling expressed through the notes. But music is also a technique that must be mastered.

Music is math and physics. It is melody. It is rhythm. It is syncopated rhythm. All of music is expressed and passed down via the written note. Understanding a musical score; how to read the notes, interpret the lines, count out the rhythm, are learned skills that can be mastered. It takes personal effort, a good teacher, and practice, practice, practice.

So you if want to be a musician, focus less on what you might believe you are "meant" to do in life. This is a separate moral and ethical concern. As a human being you are "meant" to live a good life and the best philosophers think this means to make yourself and others happy at the same time as making the world a better place. The world's great religions think the same.

If you strongly believe that you will be happy, you will make others happy and you will make the world a better place by making music, then there is your answer.

Talk to you band director. Giving up will not gain you any assistance. See if you can study one on one with a music teacher. Follow your passion.

In the meantime, here are some music theory basic lessons for free that you can study: https://www.musictheory.net/lessons

Instrument up, look at the director, count 3,2,1: DOWNBEAT!!

Good luck and I mean it. Music is wonderful.

Sue
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