Skip to main content
5 answers
5
Asked 518 views

Do you have conflicts at work about specific layouts?

I am in high school and want to become a Graphic Designer. #graphic-designer #high-school-students #art

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

5

5 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Terry’s Answer

Hi Karen,

In my experience, the art departments at the different companies where I have worked have a clear line of authority over layouts. Ultimately, it is the client's call, but the Artist Director, your boss, gets the final say over any work that is presented to the client. And, I have also found that art departments can be very collaborative if all of the artists seek to learn from each other and offer constructive critique.

Are there conflicts? I would say that there are differences of opinions. My advice is to continue to present your ideas and be open to other ideas.

Good luck!

Terry
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

James’s Answer

As an instructional designer that relies heavily on my background in graphic design, I can tell you that you will most certainly come across conflicts. One of the things that "gets" me is how the untrained and inexperienced seem to "know" more than we who have spent decades in these fields.

If you can approach them with a sound understanding of visual design and layout best-practices, this usually gets them on your side. Other times, it's an all up-hill battle of wills.

I usually listen to their needs and critiques and then supply them with the sound reasoning for the layout or design I feel is best suited for the application or medium that is invested. I will also, if time allows, design something based on their vision as a comparison. This visual representation of their idea vs. mine usually gets the point across. Many times, people see things in their heads without actually seeing it front of their eyes. Once this happens, it's hard to NOT choose the best layout.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Thomas "TC"’s Answer

Hi Karen.

There will always be conflicts when it comes to design/layouts. Reasons can vary:

> Design philosophy / Art direction criticism
> Branding inclusion or ommission
> Usability or Audience needs/issues
> Technology or container (screen size/delivery device) issues
> Campaign adherence

As a designer, there will be many business and technology issues to consider along with standard design best practices. In team situations, you may have team-based criticism before you get push-back from external departments (marketing/technology/business owners). Criticism is hopefully positive and "constructive", giving you specific ways to evolve your work. There may be unconstructive criticism at times... this is often politics and control...

Experience will teach you about the human element, whether colleagues or clients. Take curve balls in stride. Never fall too much in love with any layout! Have a plan B design if possible that addresses various potential issues.

Good luck!
Thomas
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Katie’s Answer

Hi Karen,

Good question! There are so many other factors at play when you are on an in-house team or working for a client. Being able to validate your design choices when you are presenting or debating design is key to making yourself stand out as a strong designer. If you can clearly explain why a certain layout is beneficial toward the success of the design or program, you will be able to justify your reasoning and hopefully get a chance to prove that. Even better, take every opportunity to test your theories and let the data talk for you. In my experience, if you can prove it with clear data, you will have no problem convincing stakeholders.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Melissa’s Answer

So many answers have addressed the nuances and discrepancies. The short answer is YES. There will always be conflicts because design is subjective. There is no right/wrong fact/fiction. It could be based on preferences, different levels of knowledge on a topic, last-minute restrictions (e.g. budget), and so many more. However, there are studies for why people navigate to a specific web design, or why people tend to prefer a certain article layout over others, or why certain logos fare better.

The key in dealing with these conflicts is making sure you can substantiate/defend your choices. In many cases, you will have to adjust your design based on inputs. Let them explain their decisions and discuss them thoroughly. This will help lead to the best outcome for the intended audience rather than basing it on "who is right".
0