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Is it possible to have major in Music and still be accepted into Medical? If so, would it be possible to double major and pass the MCAT?

I love playing my clarinet in Band; however, Band takes up much of my time after school and on the weekends. I fear that in college and universities, band will take up even more of my time. I want to be a doctor, but I don't know if i could still major in music while doing so. #doctor #medicine #music #health #majors

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Richard’s Answer

Yes you can do music / premed.

Pick a major that interests you so you don't mind devoting a majority of your hours to studying. You will need to get good grades in college in order to apply for medical school. At the medical school I attended, the average GPA is reported to be 3.85, so even one or two B's can hurt your chances of acceptance.
Aside from this, any major is acceptable as long as you complete the prerequisite courses. I chose to major in biochemistry because there was overlap with the premed requirements and I wanted to complete my degree in 3 years.
Typical medical school prerequisites include:
Biology: Lecture – 4 semesters; Lab – 1 semester
General Chemistry: Lecture – 2 semesters; Lab – 1 semester
Organic Chemistry: Lecture – 2 semesters; Lab – 1 semester
Biochemistry: Lecture – 1 semester
General Physics: Lecture – 2 semesters; Lab – 1 semester
Math: Statistics – 1 semester
English: Rhetoric (Composition) and Literature – 2 semesters
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Julia’s Answer

Majoring in music requires (and builds) the skill of daily habits. It does not lend itself to cramming. So, I've found that music majors or minors tend to do well in other disciplines because they adhere to a schedule, daily. That said, it depends on the college. Often high school bands take up more time than college bands because they go to competitions and have to travel. If you go to a college and are in symphonic band or orchestra, you probably won't go anywhere except rehearsals when you can get there, and concerts a couple of times of year, usually on campus. And unless you go to a big D1 school and are in Marching Band, you won't likely be traveling to games, etc. or at least not traveling very far. There are students who study other areas and play a sport, which requires daily practices and games. They, too, become adept at keeping their schedule. If you want to continue your music study and be a doctor, you can. I have a former student who is in college majoring in biology or chemistry but won first chair clarinet in the college orchestra, as a Freshman. Another girl from my kids' school is a state ranked flutist and plans to study biology/chemistry in college and play in the orchestra. I took my kid to visit Harvard and they said that to be pre-med, all you have to do is take two bio courses, two chemistry courses, and two physics courses and they don't care what else you take -- it can be anything -- languages, music, theater. I also have a friend who was very interested in theater. She majored in it in college. Toward the end of her college career she decided she wanted to be a doctor. She made up some science classes the year after graduating (some also do it in the Summer), got into med school and is now a practicing physician. If your schedule becomes too much, change it the next semester. In high school so many students are labeled and label themselves as "geeks" in certain disciplines -- I'm a band guy or a science guy or computer girl, etc. But in college you don't have to adhere to that. Your study and interests can be fluid so long as you have the core courses for the MCAT. Continuing with something you enjoy and are good at and which is an academic discipline, is a good thing. And the nuts and bolts are ask the colleges you are looking at when the rehearsals are and talk to students who are in the ensembles. Look for a fit you're comfortable with. I think you'll find a lot of students like you. Some might be music majors who take science courses or science majors who take music courses and ensembles. You usually get course credit for ensembles (helps your GPA) and since you are not planning to play professionally and will eventually go through the rigors of medical school and internship and residency where there are no electives or ensembles or formal activities, this is your last chance to play in a college and beyond level ensemble for a long time, so enjoy it. I know it all sounds so daunting but this is an exciting time. Good luck!

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Sammy’s Answer

I agree. Trying to do both would be too consuming. Go pre-med and find an outlet to play clarinet. Some colleges may have a wind ensemble for non music majors. Unless you're going into music education or good enough to play professionally in a symphony orchestra, you'll be way better off making music your hobby.


Good luck.

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