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what are the requirements to study nursing?

#medicine #Nursing

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Jennifer’s Answer

Requirements depend on the school you are applying to and it can vary. So certainly check this out before you apply because it can determine how long the program is for.
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Kerrie’s Answer

The requirements to study nursing are dependent on the degree and school you are applying to for the degree. For example, in the city and state where I lived, I opted to take prerequisites at a local community college to cut costs before entering the actual "nursing" school for the last 2 years to complete my BSN. These days there are a lot of options like that or online options, as well as traditional campus options for both 2-year and 4-year degrees.
Changes that have also been made is that a lot of acute care hospitals are no longer accepting 2-year degree RN's (LVN/LPNs) and will require a BSN upon hire. So I also make sure students understand that when asking about degree programs for nursing so they can research what is being accepted in their local city and state based on the organization, as this may affect the degree you are pursuing.

Here is a traditional track from a program (MSOE University) that I found online for a 4-year BSN degree:
Nursing, B.S. Model Full-time Traditional Track - V7.1
Year One
Fall
BI 1010 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I 3 credits
CH 2050 - General Chemistry for Life Sciences 4 credits
GS 1003 - Freshman Studies III 4 credits
SS 460 - Foundations of Psychology 3 credits
Total: 12 lecture hours - 4 lab hours - 14 credits
Winter
BI 1020 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 credits
CH 2251 - Organic Chemistry for Life Sciences 4 credits
GS 1001 - Freshman Studies I 4 credits
NU 2000 - Introduction to Professional Nursing Practice 4 credits
Total: 14 lecture hours - 4 lab hours - 16 credits
Spring
BI 256 - Microbiology 4 credits
BI 1030 - Human Anatomy and Physiology III 4 credits
CH 2261 - Biochemistry for Life Sciences 3 credits
GS 1002 - Freshman Studies II 4 credits
Total: 12 lecture hours - 6 lab hours - 15 credits
Year Two
Fall
BI 2040 - Human Anatomy and Physiology IV 4 credits
MA 1204 - Quantitative Reasoning for Health Care Professionals 4 credits
NU 220 - Health Care Terminology 2 credits
NU 260 - Nutrition 2 credits
SS 462 - Developmental Psychology 3 credits
Total: 14 lecture hours - 2 lab hours - 15 credits
Winter
NU 290 - Pathophysiology 1 4 credits
NU 2320 - Health Assessment of Family 3 credits
NU 2810 - Pharmacology I 3 credits
NU 2011 - Health Concepts and Health Assessment 6 credits
or
NU 2011C - Health Concepts and Assessment 2 credits
and
NU 2011D - Health Concepts and Assessment 4 credits
Total: 14 lecture hours - 6 lab hours - 16 credits
Spring
NU 391 - Pathophysiology II 4 credits
NU 2820 - Pharmacology II 4 credits
NU 2520 - Primary Dynamics of Nursing Care 7 credits
or
NU 2520C - Primary Dynamics of Nursing Care 3 credits
and
NU 2520D - Primary Dynamics of Nursing Care 4 credits
Total: 11 lecture hours - 11 lab hours - 15 credits
Year Three
Fall
HU 332 - Bioethics 3 credits
MA 315 - Nursing Statistics 3 credits
NU 3000L - Application of Psychomotor Skills I 1 credits
NU 300 - Transcultural Nursing 3 credits
NU 3000 - Nursing Care of Clients with Episodic Health Challenges I 7 credits
or
NU 3000C - Nursing Care of Clients with Episodic Health Challenges I 3 credits
and
NU 3000D - Nursing Care of Clients with Episodic Health Challenges I 4 credits
Total: 13 lecture hours - 12 lab hours - 17 credits
Winter
Elective1 (HU) 3 credits
Elective1 (SS) 3 credits
NU 390 - Evidence-Based Nursing Practice 3 credits
NU 3200L - Application of Psychomotor Skills II 1 credits
NU 3200 - Nursing Care of Clients with Episodic Health Challenges II 6 credits
or
NU 3200C - Nursing Care of Clients with Episodic Health Challenges II 3 credits
and
NU 3200D - Nursing Care of Clients with Episodic Health Challenges II 3 credits
Total: 12 lecture hours - 12 lab hours - 16 credits
Spring
BA 2225 - Healthcare Economics 3 credits
Elective1 (NU) 3 credits

NU 3400 - Nursing Care of Clients with Chronic Health Challenges 5 credits
or
NU 3400C - Nursing Care of Clients with Chronic Health Challenges 2 credits
and
NU 3400D - Nursing Care of Clients with Chronic Health Challenges 3 credits

NU 3600 - Nursing Care of the Community 6 credits
or
NU 3600C - Nursing Care of the Community 2 credits
and
NU 3600D - Nursing Care of the Community 4 credits
Total: 13 lecture hours - 12 lab hours - 17 credits
Year Four
Fall
Elective1 (Free) 3 credits
Elective1 (SS) 3 credits
NU 4600 - Nursing Care of Clients with Mental Health Challenges 3 credits
NU 4700 - Nursing Care of Clients with Complex Chronic Health Challenges 7 credits
or
NU 4700C - Nursing Care of Clients with Complex Chronic Health Challenges 4 credits
and
NU 4700D - Nursing Care of Clients with Complex Chronic Health Challenges 3 credits
Total: 12 lecture hours - 12 lab hours - 16 credits
Winter
NU 4961 - Nursing Leadership I 3 credits
NU 4870 - Transition to Professional Nursing Practice I 1 credits
Elective1 (HU) 3 credits
NU 4710 - Nursing Care of Clients with Complex Episodic Health Challenges 8 credits
or
NU 4710C - Nursing Care of Clients with Complex Episodic Health Challenges 4 credits
and
NU 4710D - Nursing Care of Clients with Complex Episodic Health Challenges 4 credits
Total: 11 lecture hours - 12 lab hours - 15 credits
Spring
NU 485 - Senior Nursing Preceptorship 6 credits
NU 4860 - Synthesis of Nursing Care 3 credits
NU 4880 - Transition to Professional Nursing Practice II 1 credits
NU 4971 - Nursing Leadership II 3 credits
Total: 9 lecture hours - 12 lab hours - 13 credits
Note:
1 Electives: Students must complete 15 credits of humanities (HU) and social science (SS) electives; at least 6 credits must be HU, 6 credits must be SS, and 3 credits are satisfied by SS courses in NU curriculum track. In addition, students must complete one 3-credit free elective course and one 3-credit nursing (NU) elective. Electives may occur in any order.

Nursing Electives
BI 3350 - Introduction to Genomics: Concepts and Technologies 3 credits
HU 299/ NU 299 - Global Healthcare and International Health Care Systems 3 credits
NU 350 - Nursing Care of Older Adults 3 credits
NU 450 - Gerontological Management of Care 3 credits
NU 455 - Gerontological Policy, Service and Social Issues 3 credits
NU 3100 - Principles of Electrocardiograph (ECG) Interpretation & Monitoring 3 credits
NU 3320 - Complementary and Integrative Health Therapies 3 credits
SS 415CA - Culture and Health in Central America 3 credits
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Melissa’s Answer

A very good and complex question!
There is more than one answer as it depends on the type of program you are interested in, and where you go.

Here is one path to be an RN (registered nurse):

The minimum education is an associates degree in nursing (ADN), offered in some community colleges.

Each program will have different prerequisite courses (courses you must take prior to being accepted into the program in this case). Making an A will increase your chances of being accepted into the nursing program.

The ADN RN programs are varying lengths depending on the school. Usually 4 semesters.

After completing the associates degree in nursing you are eligible to take the state board. When you pass, you will be a registered nurse and can work anywhere as an RN.

You can go back to school to get a bachelors (how long it takes depends on the college and how many college credits you can transfer- the information will be on the website), masters (lengths of programs vary), and doctorate (varying lengths) if you wish.

This is the cheapest way to do it.

I received my ADN at a community college and started working as an RN in a hospital.

Most hospitals have tuition reimbursement. I was able to work and complete my BSN online, and the cost was totally reimbursed... free.

Then I received my MSN FNP in which I also received tuition reimbursement. Those classes are more expensive so I had some expenses.

Some people graduate from high school and go to a 4 year university and get a BSN and RN (after passing the state board) when they graduate. This is a lot more expensive. Plus, you aren’t making money until the end ... and then you typically have a LOT of student debt to pay off.

A lot of high school students dwell on the amount of time it takes to get a degree, but in the end it matters very little.

The time will come and go. Ask yourself if you want a degree when you get to the end of that time period, or will you get there and regret never starting.

Anyway- good luck to all of you who are thinking about this wonderful and challenging career. It’s worth it, and if you have a passion for this type of work, your future patients need you to get started!

You are worth the time and energy to achieve your own goals ;)

Melissa
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