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How do you choose what area of Veterinarian science to choose?

I am a sophomore in Box Elder County, Utah. I love animals and have been around them my whole life. I am a proud member of my county's 4-H and FFA. My dream job started in 5th grade and still hasn't changed. I would love to be a Veterinarian. I hope that I can find something with animals that I would enjoy.
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Gretchen’s Answer

Veterinary medicine encompasses a wide range of areas that you may choose to pursue once you have attained your Doctor of Veterinary Medicine(DVM) degree. You do not have to choose while you are in school, however you can “track” toward certain areas of interest to you. You will learn all aspects of all animal systems including anatomy, surgery, physiology, pharmacy and toxicology. As you progress in your studies, you may choose to take additional rotations in small animal, equine, exotic or avian medicine for example, especially during your clinical year. By this fourth year of study, most students will find where their interests are. Upon graduation, you can then choose your job from the type of practice that interest you most, like emergency medicine, exotic pets, equine or small animal medicine and surgery, and even specialties like oncology or opthomology!
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Adrianna’s Answer

Hi Brooklynn,
It's awesome to here you are in 4-H and FFA. I was a member of both of those when I was in school as well and loved it so much I was an officer in FFA for many years. I don't know how your program is run but if your AG advisor or another teacher have a Veterinary science class that you can take, I would highly recommend it.

When I was young, and for most of my life I wanted to be a Veterinarian as I saw it as the best course of action to help animals that need help. Though this is an admirable field that requires a lot of hard work and commitment, it is not the only field that allows you to work with animals and help improve their lives. The Vet field can be a very difficult field to work in. I worked at a vet clinic as a Veterinarian assistant for a while and saw many of the doctors very stressed, and though I worked at an AMAZING clinic, I heard 1 to many horror stories of how vets were treated at other places. Veterinarians have the 4th highest suicide rate out of all professions because many times they are not treated with as much respect as they should, clients think they are being greedy and money grubbing (which is not at all true and many vets in my opinion do not get paid enough!), and some people are just straight up negligent with their animals and don't care whats best for them. In my short time of being at the clinic I saw one to many animals that didn't get proper pet care and wouldn't take the Dr's advice.

My advice is to try and work at a clinic before going to far into the field. Most clinics will hire on people with little to no experience and it will be a great way to see what goes into it. It will also help you narrow down your focus onto which critters you want to work with the most. Many vets will allow you to learn from them, answer all your questions, and even let you peak in on surgeries.

In general, if this is the path you choose, be prepared to put a lot of work in, and make sure to do as much research into it as possible, try and work or volunteer at a clinic to really get the feel for it, and I wish you the best. I don't want to scare you away from it, just make sure you have all the information you can!
Best of luck!
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Adrianna’s Answer

Hi Brooklynn,
It's awesome to here you are in 4-H and FFA. I was a member of both of those when I was in school as well and loved it so much I was an officer in FFA for many years. I don't know how your program is run but if your AG advisor or another teacher have a Veterinary science class that you can take, I would highly recommend it.

When I was young, and for most of my life I wanted to be a Veterinarian as I saw it as the best course of action to help animals that need help. Though this is an admirable field that requires a lot of hard work and commitment, it is not the only field that allows you to work with animals and help improve their lives. The Vet field can be a very difficult field to work in. I worked at a vet clinic as a Veterinarian assistant for a while and saw many of the doctors very stressed, and though I worked at an AMAZING clinic, I heard 1 to many horror stories of how vets were treated at other places. Veterinarians have the 4th highest suicide rate out of all professions because many times they are not treated with as much respect as they should, clients think they are being greedy and money grubbing (which is not at all true and many vets in my opinion do not get paid enough!), and some people are just straight up negligent with their animals and don't care whats best for them. In my short time of being at the clinic I saw one to many animals that didn't get proper pet care and wouldn't take the Dr's advice.

My advice is to try and work at a clinic before going to far into the field. Most clinics will hire on people with little to no experience and it will be a great way to see what goes into it. It will also help you narrow down your focus onto which critters you want to work with the most. Many vets will allow you to learn from them, answer all your questions, and even let you peak in on surgeries.

In general, if this is the path you choose, be prepared to put a lot of work in, and make sure to do as much research into it as possible, try and work or volunteer at a clinic to really get the feel for it, and I wish you the best. I don't want to scare you away from it, just make sure you have all the information you can!
Best of luck!
0