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I need internships for being a vet, Any tips?

I need tips

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Melanie’s Answer

Hello!

Being a vet can be a very rewarding experience! This is so great that you are interested. I have three suggestions for you.

1.). The first suggestion would be to volunteer at a local animal shelter. If you are interested in being a vet to cats and dogs, this would be a great way to gain experience.

2.). The second idea is for you to call local vet clinics and see if they need some help. You can learn a lot at a vet clinic.

3.). The third suggestion is to contact your local zoo and see if they can provide some type of internship experience for you.

I do hope this is helpful to you! I think it's great you are interested in this field. BEST of luck to you.
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Karin’s Answer

Hi CAdore,

That's fabulous!! I am so jealous! I wish I could become a vet!

For an internship I would first look up the vets in your area. Then I would give it a bit of thought how they are different and what kind of vet you want to be and what interests you most (or if you have time and interest to do more than one).

1. Large vet clinic vs individual vet practice: a large clinic has probably more "interesting" cases and will do surgeries and analytics in house. On the other hand, a smaller vet might be less busy and if they take you under their wing and teach very hands-on, that can be an advantage.

2. City vet vs country vet: a city vet mostly sees cat and dogs and some rabbits/guineapigs/gerbils. If you are more interested in large animals, a country vet is a whole different story. You won't be birthing cows at a city vet.

3. In some places, specialist vets, e.g. for birds or reptiles exist. This could be good training, because vets see whatever comes in the door.

4. A veterinary school would be a great place for an internship because they get really interesting cases and even some exotic animals, like zoo animals. You could also get a headstart on lab work and all the analytical techniques.

5. If you get a chance to volunteer at a wildlife rescue you could learn a lot about helping injured wildlife and how to bring up orphaned kritters. Remember, someone finds an injured animal they'll bring it to the vet even if they have no special knowledge in that area.

6. You could also volunteer at a local animal rescue. If you could help screen incoming animals, give ear and eye drops and dewormer, you would be a great help. If it works with your living situation and time constraints you could also bring up some orphaned kittens and puppies.

Good luck!

KP
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Nirah’s Answer

If you are already in vet school and are a vet school student, then you are correct, internships are required. These take place in your fourth year and need to be approved by your veterinary school. You must get your internships approved with them. However, I suspect that what you actually meant is that you are a high school student or college student looking for experience to help you get into vet school. A formal internship is not necessarily required. Each veterinary school can have unique requirements. Go to the admissions website for the specific vet schools where you plan to apply, and review what their requirements are for animal experience. Your best bet for getting into vet school is at the school in the state in which you are a resident, or if you live in one of the states with no vet school, your state will have a contract with the vet school in another nearby state.
Things to consider for your experience:
Logistics: can you actually get to the location on a consistent basis, are the hours ones you can work, and are you old enough to do the work? If you are under 18, there are often restrictions. Also, does the opportunity give you enough contact hours? Again, check the website of the vet schools you’re interested in, but in general more contact hours is better, as is a longer commitment. Even if it’s just a half day a week, a semester-long commitment is likely going to look better than just doing one intensive weekend in an animal setting. getting a variety of experiences is helpful, not only forgetting into that school but also for convincing yourself that this is really the right pathway for you. While any animal experience at all is helpful, the closer it can be to veterinary practice the better.
Your interest: if your dream is to be a horse vet, animal experience at a cat shelter may not be as good as farm experience with horses, and vice versa.
Opportunity to get a compelling letter of recommendation: spending the summer on your uncle’s farm may be great animal experience, but for getting into vet school, a letter of recommendation on letterhead from the Director of a pet shelter or veterinary practice may take you further.

Nirah recommends the following next steps:

Review the information at the admissions website for your state veterinary school
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