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What is your advice for me as a freshmen student?

I'm kinda scared hahaha Thank you guys! #students #student-development #college-student

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Subject: Career question for you

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Shannon’s Answer

Try to talk to your teachers if you're worried about something before your course begins. If your college has a Careers team, try to meet with one of them if you are anxious about your career. Most of your classmates will be just as nervous as you are, so try not to feel intimidated. If you're able to, try to channel your nerves into positive action. Join a club or a student network, or sign up to volunteer at a local or online charity to make friends and explore your passions - it will also look good on future job applications.
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! Miss Shanon! I'll put that on my mind. ☺️ Era
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Tronor’s Answer

Great question. As a freshmen everything is new. As a college student in a different environment there are many things that will be different from leaving home. It can be easy to be a loner but I recommend make friends. We all need each other and a friend can help through good times and bad. Also for class, get to know your professors. Any questions you have make sure you ask them early on during the semester to make sure you are ahead(stay ahead, which was a mistake I made). Utilize all resources that are available to you. If you already know your major, a mentor is a great thing to have as well. They can help you with your studies and guide you through your college journey/major. Also find a hobby. You have to take time for yourself outside of just studying.
Thank you comment icon Thanks Tronor! I'll definitely do you advice! Have a nice day!!! Era
Thank you comment icon You're welcome. Tronor Jenkins
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Marites’s Answer

Hi Era - just think of the first day when you started elementary and high school. It's the same thing. The school, people and teachers will all be new to you. Your classmates will be in the same boat as you - nervous, anxious, excited, it's a mixed feeling. I'd say don't think about it too much and just look forward to the new friendships, new learnings, new opportunities that you will learn when you go to college. You managed to finish elementary and high school and you had the same feelings back then as new student, so you will manage to complete your college journey as well! Be positive, focus, surround yourself with good people, and build good relationships! Good luck!
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Victoria’s Answer

Hi Era!

Great question - the transition into college can be daunting for sure. I graduated from college this year and looking back I would say that the biggest regret I had was not doing a better job at balancing academics with fun. Throughout college I would swing heavily across the spectrum without really finding a true balance. I think it is important to realize that those 4 or however many years in college you attend for is a period of time where you can learn a lot both professionally/academically and personally. Take the time to grow and develop in each area, it is a lot harder to do so when you're stuck in the weeds at work.
Thank you comment icon Thank you Miss Vic!! ☺️♥️ Era
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Natalie’s Answer

Give yourself GRACE! You may fall but your ability to get back up is your power. Have fun but make your studies priority. Take your time and be yourself. - Nat
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Brittany’s Answer

Congrats on entering college! This is such an exciting time for you!

The biggest piece of advice I could give you is to keep an open mind. I entered college as one major on a certain career path and by the time I graduated my major and career path were completely different. I took classes that I found interesting and through that, was able to find what I was truly passionate about. Now is the time to take (constructive) risks, learn all that you can, and make connections across multiple disciplines.

Best of luck!!!
Thank you comment icon Thank you Miss Brit!!! Era
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Liz’s Answer

Relax and enjoy yourself - you will meet tons of new people and get to explore all kinds of options for your future. Do the serious things (study, be safe...) but don't forget this can be the most carefree time before you're 100% out in the "adult" world.
Thank you comment icon Okay thank you for your advice!! ☺️♥️ Era
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Cari’s Answer

I always encourage young people as they begin their college studies to work hard, learn as much as possible, and enjoy the process, Get to know the professors, pay attention in class, and stay engaged. Try not to get too caught up in newfound freedoms (if going away from home) because there will be plenty of time for that kind of fun later. Choose a field that aligns with your strengths and things you enjoy doing.
Thank you comment icon Thank you Miss Cari! Era
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Simeon’s Answer

Look at the curriculum for your classes, print them off, and take a look at the assignments percentage of your total grade. This will give you a better idea of what to focus on when it comes to studying. Look for good work-study options on campus. There are sometimes really easy assignments and you can even sometimes be allowed to do your homework while doing some of them. For instance, I worked in the front desk of my dorm signing in visitors and sorting mail. If there were no mail or visitors, I was able to work on my homework while I waited and it was easy to focus on getting it done since I couldn't leave the desk. This helped me support myself financially while also giving me focused study time.
Thank you comment icon Okay thank you so much!!! Era
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Wayne’s Answer

Hi Era. I was also scared when I first went to college as a freshman. It's a whole new experience that can feel quite dauting, but you can handle it.

Here are some tips:

1. Be ready before classes start. Moving from high school to college can be a big transition for students, and this year's incoming freshmen are facing new challenges as the coronavirus pandemic has pushed many colleges to fully online or hybrid classes. For those stressing over this new life chapter and today's uncertainties, there are ways to prepare before starting those first classes. From researching academic support to developing strong interpersonal skills, the following tips can help incoming freshmen get organized and build a foundation for college success.

2. Gear up for online classes. This year's freshman experience may likely be a bit different from previous years. Students can prepare for more online classes and new social distancing measures by checking their college's website frequently for updates. Before classes start, students should acquire all the necessary technology they might need to complete online courses successfully and research school resources before problems arise.

3. Read as much as possible. College coursework consists of substantially more reading than is required in high school. Students should start getting used to the increased workload by reading books during high school and the summer before college. What you read is not as important as how much, but it helps to select recommendations for your intended college major or areas of academic and personal interest.

4. Research possible college majors. I did this and it helped a lot. At most colleges, students do not need to know with certainty which college major they will pursue the first day of freshman year. But students should start thinking about what they might like to study in preparation to select courses. Those interested in prelaw and premed, for example, should learn more about those tracks if their college offers them.

5. Polish social, people and soft skills. College pushes students to develop strong communication skills. From group projects to communicating with professors, an ability to convey ideas clearly and work collaboratively will serve students well. That includes dealing with social issues; many students will find themselves working closely with people from different backgrounds and life experiences, so they should consider taking advantage of diversity and inclusion classes or books. In addition, leadership and problem-solving skills will be important qualities when it comes time to apply for jobs and internships during school and after graduation. With that in mind, students should consider enrolling in courses that teach soft skills once school begins.


6. Embrace time-management tools. This is evry important. Balancing the academic and social demands of college can be a challenge for even the most diligent student. But there are plenty of digital tools designed for students, and a little organization can go a long way in making sure time is used wisely. Smartphone apps and tools can help students limit time on entertainment and social media, and can help keep study schedules on track.

7. Weigh getting a job freshman year. College is expensive, and costs go beyond tuition and fees. Day-to-day expenses make up a significant chunk of a student's college budget. A part-time job can alleviate budget strains, but also take time away from classes. Some students may also be eligible to participate in the federal work-study program, and college financial aid offices can help answer any questions before the semester begins. Before making the decision to work as college freshmen, students should talk to their families about financial expectations.

8. Keep in touch with the financial aid office. This helped me out a lot personally. If a family's financial situation changes in the months before freshman year, there are options to get more help to pay for college. Financial aid appeals requesting more aid may become more common as American families experience unemployment and reduced work hours resulting from the economic impacts of the coronavirus outbreak. Stay in touch with the financial aid office and ask for more financial support if it's needed. Also, always ask your program about scholarship that you may be eligilbe for and apply for as many of them as possible.

9. Know how to stay safe on campus. Some students will find themselves taking courses both online and in person as the U.S. and other parts of the world continue to grapple with the coronavirus pandemic, and it's important for students to feel safe navigating campus. Students should practice common sense by being aware of their surroundings and learning about how their college handles safety issues, including sexual assault. Both parents and students should take time before the semester begins to become familiar with the campus' safety resources and procedures.

10. Contact professors before classes start. Cultivating a strong relationship with professors can go a long way in helping students succeed. Once students have selected their classes, they should consider emailing a handful of instructors or seeing if they can talk via videoconferencing or a phone call this summer. Make sure to be respectful and mature in all communications with professors and other academic staff.

11. Make the most of orientation activities. Orientation typically begins in the weeks and sometimes months before classes start, but it may be postponed or held entirely online. Still, it's a great way for students to get acclimated and ask plenty of questions. Realize that everyone is trying to make friends and adjust to a new environment, so don't be shy. After orientation, many schools offer unique first-year experiences that help students further connect with their classmates and college community.

12. Research ways to get involved. College provides a number of opportunities for students to explore existing interests or embark on new hobbies. Whether it's joining a musical ensemble or getting involved in social issues, many schools make it easy to get involved. Having a plan of action before arriving will help students select meaningful activities and ensure they don't miss any important sign-up dates or meetings once school starts.

13. Know where to go for academic help. Incoming freshmen should be aware that many colleges have offices dedicated to helping students brainstorm and write essays. Students having difficulty in a class or who just want to speak with a professor one-on-one should take advantage of open office hours. School libraries can also offer knowledgeable staff and study resources to help students. These options can be especially valuable for international students who might be struggling with English language skills.

Good luck!
Thank you comment icon God, thank you Wayne!! I will definitely take your advice. thank you for sharing your thoughts and btw I'm not from US, I'm from Philippines. Salamaaat God bless! Era
Thank you comment icon You're welcome. Take care and good luck! Wayne Archibald
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Nathalie’s Answer

Hi!
I would recommend networking and joining student organizations. They are a great way to learn more about the career(s) you are interested in and to have fun!
I would also recommend taking on at least 1 internship, if not more. These opportunities are priceless. You will be able to network with professionals, practice what you have learned, and narrow down what your next path will look like.
If you are able to, I would also highly recommend doing a study aboard program. I completed a short summer one and I wish I had done a full semester program. It was the best experience and could not talk about it enough!
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Yasemin’s Answer

Hi Era! Congratulations on college, great job! It's completely normal to be nervous; I remember when I first set foot on my campus and I was so scared but excited at the same time. I'll offer some advice from my own experience!

Make sure to arrive early for class especially if you will be driving to school; the traffic on campus and the parking lot can be very busy so it's good to get early there. This is especially true if you have an early class and for exam days!

Research the resources on campus because there are many different ways for students to get help; stop by the career center for internships and part time work options, talk with a financial aid adviser for tips on loans and managing debt (I think it's important to have a good sense of some finances in college), make a tutoring appointment for when you struggle in class and get that extra help, as well as check out the writing center for the last read-over for your research paper (as an example).

Reach out to your professors, this part falls on the student mostly; in high school with smaller class sizes it is easier for students to get noticed by a teacher but in college the classes can vary with classes being up to a 100 students or more (depending on the university). In these settings it is important for students to track their progress and visit the professor during office hours for that extra help and to get yourself known especially for recommendation letters in the future. Professors are helpful even though they may seem busy but they want students who are interested and want to be helped; I had a chemistry professor who was tough in class but was helpful as I reached out to him more and even received a recommendation letter in the end! Therefore it is important to keep an open mind and stay active in class.

Friends! Some of the most amazing people you will meet will be in college, I met some of my closest friends during this time. There are many ways such as events or clubs to meet people, but mostly I met my friends in class. We studied together and shared our knowledge and helped each other get the best grades possible. While you may meet longtime friends, it's also important to know that some friends may be just for the class time, such as during the semester for a group project and afterwards it may be difficult to stay in touch. Nonetheless, it is good to have some close friends to keep you grounded and share your college experience with.

Be prepared on campus with certain essentials, especially if you are commuting. Some are umbrellas, water bottles, and certain outfits for weather. As a college student you are walking more and will also be outdoors, and while this may be nice during spring time it can be hard with rain and harsh cold winters. I would advise to always check the weather before you leave your dorm or house and dress accordingly! Sometimes I had forgotten my umbrella or my hat or gloves and it was difficult especially when I had to do a lot of walking. Since I was commuting from home I would always bring extra water bottles and some lunch with me; while there are options on campus for food and that I would buy at times, I think it's important to balance that, especially in terms of being healthy and also not spending too much extra money throughout the day as debt can add up. My friend who would dorm had a balance per semester and she would use her ID card and "swipe" each time she would buy a meal; there are meal plans that are available to students that you can sign up for and receive a certain balance each semester that would allow you a number of "swipes". In addition to healthy meal options, I would also recommend to check out the gym as it is part of your tuition! I think by going to the gym you can release stress and stay active and healthy, which I think is crucial for a college student who studies most of their time.

Lastly, stay in touch with your adviser; they help with scheduling classes and making sure you are on track to graduate! definitely make an appointment with them per semester and just touch base.

I hope this helps! Please let me know if you have more questions, study hard, stay active and find ways to release some stress and you will be just fine!
Best of luck future undergrad!
Thank you comment icon Thank youuuu!!!! 🥺♥️ I'll definitely ask you a lot now hahaha. Have a great day thank you for your advice! God bless lovee youuu!!! Era
Thank you comment icon You're welcome!! Yasemin G.
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