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its gonna sound kind of dumb question but this year i’m gonna go in college after i did my gsce and i wanna became a doctor so what should i study on?

#medicalstudent#health#medicine#doctor#student#college# career-counseling nurse doctor

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MATTHEW’s Answer

Hi there,
Firstly I think worth stating there is no dumb question, asking questions is an important part of the learning process.

For the UK, post Gcse, the typical a-levels to study would be Biology, Chemistry, Maths or Physics, and if I recall well students use to have to obtain very strong A-level grades.

I found this from UCAS:

Academic route
seven GCSEs, including sciences, with 5 subjects at grades 9 to 7 (A* or A) and English and maths at least grade 6 to 5 (B)
three A levels at grade A in chemistry and either biology, physics or maths, plus another academic subject.


https://www.ucas.com/ucas/after-gcses/find-career-ideas/explore-jobs/job-profile/hospital-doctor

There are other routes included in following link from the British Medical Association :

https://www.bma.org.uk/advice-and-support/studying-medicine/becoming-a-doctor/medical-training-pathway


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Updated Translate

MATTHEW’s Answer

Hi there,
Firstly I think worth stating there is no dumb question, asking questions is an important part of the learning process.

For the UK, post Gcse, the typical a-levels to study would be Biology, Chemistry, Maths or Physics, and if I recall well students use to have to obtain very strong A-level grades.

I found this from UCAS:

Academic route
seven GCSEs, including sciences, with 5 subjects at grades 9 to 7 (A* or A) and English and maths at least grade 6 to 5 (B)
three A levels at grade A in chemistry and either biology, physics or maths, plus another academic subject.


https://www.ucas.com/ucas/after-gcses/find-career-ideas/explore-jobs/job-profile/hospital-doctor

There are other routes included in following link from the British Medical Association :

https://www.bma.org.uk/advice-and-support/studying-medicine/becoming-a-doctor/medical-training-pathway


0
Updated Translate

MATTHEW’s Answer

Hi there,
Firstly I think worth stating there is no dumb question, asking questions is an important part of the learning process.

For the UK, post Gcse, the typical a-levels to study would be Biology, Chemistry, Maths or Physics, and if I recall well students use to have to obtain very strong A-level grades.

I found this from UCAS:

Academic route
seven GCSEs, including sciences, with 5 subjects at grades 9 to 7 (A* or A) and English and maths at least grade 6 to 5 (B)
three A levels at grade A in chemistry and either biology, physics or maths, plus another academic subject.


https://www.ucas.com/ucas/after-gcses/find-career-ideas/explore-jobs/job-profile/hospital-doctor

There are other routes included in following link from the British Medical Association :

https://www.bma.org.uk/advice-and-support/studying-medicine/becoming-a-doctor/medical-training-pathway


0
Updated Translate

MATTHEW’s Answer

Hi there,
Firstly I think worth stating there is no dumb question, asking questions is an important part of the learning process.

For the UK, post Gcse, the typical a-levels to study would be Biology, Chemistry, Maths or Physics, and if I recall well students use to have to obtain very strong A-level grades.

I found this from UCAS:

Academic route
seven GCSEs, including sciences, with 5 subjects at grades 9 to 7 (A* or A) and English and maths at least grade 6 to 5 (B)
three A levels at grade A in chemistry and either biology, physics or maths, plus another academic subject.


https://www.ucas.com/ucas/after-gcses/find-career-ideas/explore-jobs/job-profile/hospital-doctor

There are other routes included in following link from the British Medical Association :

https://www.bma.org.uk/advice-and-support/studying-medicine/becoming-a-doctor/medical-training-pathway


0
Updated Translate

MATTHEW’s Answer

Hi there,
Firstly I think worth stating there is no dumb question, asking questions is an important part of the learning process.

For the UK, post Gcse, the typical a-levels to study would be Biology, Chemistry, Maths or Physics, and if I recall well students use to have to obtain very strong A-level grades.

I found this from UCAS:

Academic route
seven GCSEs, including sciences, with 5 subjects at grades 9 to 7 (A* or A) and English and maths at least grade 6 to 5 (B)
three A levels at grade A in chemistry and either biology, physics or maths, plus another academic subject.


https://www.ucas.com/ucas/after-gcses/find-career-ideas/explore-jobs/job-profile/hospital-doctor

There are other routes included in following link from the British Medical Association :

https://www.bma.org.uk/advice-and-support/studying-medicine/becoming-a-doctor/medical-training-pathway


0
Updated Translate

MATTHEW’s Answer

Hi there,
Firstly I think worth stating there is no dumb question, asking questions is an important part of the learning process.

For the UK, post Gcse, the typical a-levels to study would be Biology, Chemistry, Maths or Physics, and if I recall well students use to have to obtain very strong A-level grades.

I found this from UCAS:

Academic route
seven GCSEs, including sciences, with 5 subjects at grades 9 to 7 (A* or A) and English and maths at least grade 6 to 5 (B)
three A levels at grade A in chemistry and either biology, physics or maths, plus another academic subject.


https://www.ucas.com/ucas/after-gcses/find-career-ideas/explore-jobs/job-profile/hospital-doctor

There are other routes included in following link from the British Medical Association :

https://www.bma.org.uk/advice-and-support/studying-medicine/becoming-a-doctor/medical-training-pathway


0
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Frank’s Answer

Unfortunately, I can't help with your pursuit of a career in the medical profession. My advice, however, is to always phrase your questions (in CareerVillage, in college, in networking, etc.) in a positive way. There's no need to call out a question as "dumb". Reframe questions such as:
- Could you give me advice on the following area?
- Could you help guide me in my pursuit?
- Can you help me understand this better?
- Can you clarify this point to ensure I understand?
Most professionals are more than happy to provide advice and guidance, so approach your questions with curiosity instead of self-doubt.
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Updated Translate

MATTHEW’s Answer

Hi there,
Firstly I think worth stating there is no dumb question, asking questions is an important part of the learning process.

For the UK, post Gcse, the typical a-levels to study would be Biology, Chemistry, Maths or Physics, and if I recall well students use to have to obtain very strong A-level grades.

I found this from UCAS:

Academic route
seven GCSEs, including sciences, with 5 subjects at grades 9 to 7 (A* or A) and English and maths at least grade 6 to 5 (B)
three A levels at grade A in chemistry and either biology, physics or maths, plus another academic subject.


https://www.ucas.com/ucas/after-gcses/find-career-ideas/explore-jobs/job-profile/hospital-doctor

There are other routes included in following link from the British Medical Association :

https://www.bma.org.uk/advice-and-support/studying-medicine/becoming-a-doctor/medical-training-pathway


0
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David’s Answer

Hi, this is not a dumb question. I would recommend studying Latin (as in the "dead" language Latin) if at all possible. As it happens, most college graduates know about 15,000 words when they graduate from college. Medical students have a vocabulary of about 21,000 words.

1.) Never play Scrabble with a medical professional...
2.) The 6000 word difference is mostly Latin/Greek.

Knowing the language of medicine will give you a great advantage. See example below.
Fingers (English) = Digitos (Latin)

Medical Term: Tensor Digitorum Long
The extensor digitorum muscle (also known as extensor digitorum communis) is a muscle of the posterior forearm present in humans and other animals. It extends the medial four digits of the hand. Extensor digitorum is innervated by the posterior interosseous nerve, which is a branch of the radial nerve. (WikiPedia)

Hope this helps!

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MATTHEW’s Answer

Hi there,
Firstly I think worth stating there is no dumb question, asking questions is an important part of the learning process.

For the UK, post Gcse, the typical a-levels to study would be Biology, Chemistry, Maths or Physics, and if I recall well students use to have to obtain very strong A-level grades.

I found this from UCAS:

Academic route
seven GCSEs, including sciences, with 5 subjects at grades 9 to 7 (A* or A) and English and maths at least grade 6 to 5 (B)
three A levels at grade A in chemistry and either biology, physics or maths, plus another academic subject.


https://www.ucas.com/ucas/after-gcses/find-career-ideas/explore-jobs/job-profile/hospital-doctor

There are other routes included in following link from the British Medical Association :

https://www.bma.org.uk/advice-and-support/studying-medicine/becoming-a-doctor/medical-training-pathway


0
Updated Translate

MATTHEW’s Answer

Hi there,
Firstly I think worth stating there is no dumb question, asking questions is an important part of the learning process.

For the UK, post Gcse, the typical a-levels to study would be Biology, Chemistry, Maths or Physics, and if I recall well students use to have to obtain very strong A-level grades.

I found this from UCAS:

Academic route
seven GCSEs, including sciences, with 5 subjects at grades 9 to 7 (A* or A) and English and maths at least grade 6 to 5 (B)
three A levels at grade A in chemistry and either biology, physics or maths, plus another academic subject.


https://www.ucas.com/ucas/after-gcses/find-career-ideas/explore-jobs/job-profile/hospital-doctor

There are other routes included in following link from the British Medical Association :

https://www.bma.org.uk/advice-and-support/studying-medicine/becoming-a-doctor/medical-training-pathway


0
Updated Translate

MATTHEW’s Answer

Hi there,
Firstly I think worth stating there is no dumb question, asking questions is an important part of the learning process.

For the UK, post Gcse, the typical a-levels to study would be Biology, Chemistry, Maths or Physics, and if I recall well students use to have to obtain very strong A-level grades.

I found this from UCAS:

Academic route
seven GCSEs, including sciences, with 5 subjects at grades 9 to 7 (A* or A) and English and maths at least grade 6 to 5 (B)
three A levels at grade A in chemistry and either biology, physics or maths, plus another academic subject.


https://www.ucas.com/ucas/after-gcses/find-career-ideas/explore-jobs/job-profile/hospital-doctor

There are other routes included in following link from the British Medical Association :

https://www.bma.org.uk/advice-and-support/studying-medicine/becoming-a-doctor/medical-training-pathway


0
Updated Translate

MATTHEW’s Answer

Hi there,
Firstly I think worth stating there is no dumb question, asking questions is an important part of the learning process.

For the UK, post Gcse, the typical a-levels to study would be Biology, Chemistry, Maths or Physics, and if I recall well students use to have to obtain very strong A-level grades.

I found this from UCAS:

Academic route
seven GCSEs, including sciences, with 5 subjects at grades 9 to 7 (A* or A) and English and maths at least grade 6 to 5 (B)
three A levels at grade A in chemistry and either biology, physics or maths, plus another academic subject.


https://www.ucas.com/ucas/after-gcses/find-career-ideas/explore-jobs/job-profile/hospital-doctor

There are other routes included in following link from the British Medical Association :

https://www.bma.org.uk/advice-and-support/studying-medicine/becoming-a-doctor/medical-training-pathway


0
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Thomas’s Answer

I would recommend enrolling in a Pre-Med program or science related major at your university. That will help to prepare you for medical school.
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