5 answers

What colleges are recommended for studying chemistry?

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I want to study chemistry,but i'm not sure where to start.I mean besides a community college,what other colleges should I look into? #college-major #chemistry #colleges #pharmaceuticals

5 answers

Elizabeth’s Answer

Updated

Hi Desiree,


So thrilled that you are looking to continue your education and explore schools aligned to your area of focus! Princeton Review and College Board are great websites to explore schools that specialize in Chemistry (or searching for a school that aligns to any major for that matter) Here is a link: http://www.princetonreview.com/college-advice/find-your-best-fit-college


And, here is a link to some schools for chemistry: http://www.princetonreview.com/college-majors/56/chemistry


Also, College Board has a great tool that will give you a "college roadmap" that will make sure you are on track with all deadlines such as PSAT, SAT, applications, financial aid, etc.


Lastly, it is great to go into a school knowing your major, do you know that you college is a journey towards self-discovery and it is always ok to change your major once you get to your school.

Devangkumar’s Answer

Updated

Hi Desiree,
Earlier comments are very informative and helpful. My advice is to first find out if you really like chemistry and there is a potential to be good at it while you are still in high school. There are various specialization in Chemistry. Such as Organic, Inorganic, Analytical, Medicinal, Pharmaceutical and so on... Visiting or taking internship in Chemical or Pharmaceutical Laboratory will give you real life exposure to a day in a life of a chemist. Once you choose the specialization you want to pursue, then go ahead and research which university offer the best program and research funding. I believe this is the best way to go. I hope that you earn a PhD and follow a rewarding career in research or product development. Good Luck!

David’s Answer

Updated

Hi Desiree!


I was a chemistry major myself and it's a great option as it's a field with a lot of opportunities given the demand for scientists.


In my experience, if you want to be a practicing chemist, most jobs require at least a masters degree (and in many cases a phd), so you'll need to keep that in mind.


As it relates to picking what college to go to, I think the most important thing is to go to a school that offers a chemistry program that has sufficient funding. Chemistry can be pretty expensive with all the equipment and a lot of your training will come not from the classroom, but from your labs. Unfortunately, this means that some smaller colleges and community colleges won't have the resources necessary for you to be successful, so I would look into the programs in locations that interest you and talk to some people at the program to get a sense of the resources they offer. I would also look at your state colleges, as they are generally larger and have more funding available than community colleges, and so likely have more resources available. One option that can save money is to look at is to attend community colleges for your general education requirements and then transfer those credits to a state college to complete your last 2 years, including most of your chemistry classes.


Good luck!

Matthew’s Answer

Updated

Hi Desiree,


What are you hoping to do with your chemistry degree? It's possible to go straight into a job after getting your undergraduate degree, and also possible to get a masters or PhD.


Here is a list of the top chemistry programs in the US.
http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-science-schools/chemistry-rankings


Take a look and see which schools are located in a location you would be happy going to. You can also look at the acceptance rates to get an idea of how difficult it would be to gain admission. It's good to apply to some reach schools (hard to get in to) some competitive, and some safety schools just in case -- there is some luck involved in the application process.

Thank you! Desiree D.
Think about which schools offer you scholarships or funding to support your studies. Higher Education is a financial decision. No need to graduate loaded with debt especially if the career you hope to pursue afterwards does not offer a competitive salary. Wenylla Reid
When you making plans for an career you have be focus, and that goal in your mind, lock it in your mind,like locking a door with a key and don't let it out,claim what you want and you get started don't quit~~~~ Ralph F.
Nice answer sir. kanika M.

Ken’s Answer

Updated

Hi Desiree!


There are many good schools in which you could get a good education, but the most important thing to keep in mind is that it should reflect your personality and interest area.


Starting at a community is a very prudent way to begin your education, as it will enable you to get the first two years at a cost that will not result in high student loans.


Good luck. Keep me informed, I would like to help further if I can.


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