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How do I know what I want to do is really for me?

Hello, I don't really want to go to college and I am still trying to figure out my future. I could honestly be so much, so it is difficult trying to find and pick one thing. Is college really for me? The experience wouldn't be the same as it would a decade ago, so what is and what isn't for me?
#higher-education #confused

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Subject: Career question for you

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Doc’s Answer

Tatiana although college has many advantages, it’s not for everyone, and there are many factors that should be evaluated before making a decision. Most jobs nowadays require a college degree, however, there are some fields that don’t require a college education. If you don't see college in your future, don't worry. There are plenty of options for successful careers where you don't have to earn a college degree.

TRADESPERSON – Employees skilled in different trades, such as electricians, machinists, and construction workers, play a critical role in society by keeping our day-to-day lives running smoothly. A good place to start is by looking for trade schools in your area. These schools will have programs designed to help you earn your license in a specific trade. Most have a program in place to help you find an apprenticeship so you can earn your hours toward your license once you have completed the preliminary coursework.

2-YEAR COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Community and junior colleges offer a wide variety of two-year associate degree programs. They're typically less expensive than four-year schools and often have less stringent admissions criteria. Community and junior colleges are a good choice for students who don't wish to commit to a four-year program or those who only need to take a few classes to qualify for a profession.

REAL ESTATE AGENTS – Real estate agents represent buyers and sellers of commercial, residential and other properties. These professionals must be knowledgeable about local neighborhoods and property laws. Real estate agents may also need marketing skills to promote themselves and their properties. While a college degree isn't a necessity, postsecondary institutes offer certificate, associate's and bachelor's programs in real estate. These programs include coursework in real estate law, investing and finance. Some programs may integrate courses that are required by state licensing boards into the program. Many are self-employed, and others work in real estate agencies, including franchises with many offices around the country. They are usually paid on commission, so their income depends on their sales performance and on market conditions.

POLICE OFFICER – Do you need college to be a Police Officer? The short answer is no, as some departments only require a high school diploma. However, many states often require police officers to be 21 years of age. So, it could be advantageous to use these extra years to get a college degree. Completing an associate degree program in criminal justice, law enforcement, or a related discipline, while not required can be advantageous when vying for officer positions. State and federal agencies generally require their recruits to have a college education. Degree-holders also may advance their careers more rapidly than those without a relevant degree. Some departments will even provide tuition assistance to officers who seek degrees in pertinent fields.

DENTAL HYGIENIST – Dental hygienist education requirements usually include holding an undergraduate degree. Many dental hygienists hold an associates degree, such as an Associate for Applied Science in Dental Hygiene. Two-year degree programs are available at community colleges, vocational institutes, or dental schools. Programs will focus on teaching you to use dental software, tools, and machines. Courses may include oral pathology, dental materials, radiology, infection control, pain management, periodontics, community dental health, and pharmacology. You'll need to develop solid interpersonal skills; dental hygienists work with patients on a daily basis and often have to explain dental procedures. You must also be compassionate, since patients may be in severe pain or be fearful of dental procedures.

Hope this is helpful Tatiana
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Kelly’s Answer

Hi,

I would say try a cheaper college and go for it one semester. Along the way try other things if you like college keep going with college, if you like something else go with something else.
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Iwona’s Answer

Hello. There is nothing wrong with working for a few years and then circling back if you think you may want to attend college. Sometimes you gain a better perspective of what you want out of life after working. You may find out that you are not to thrilled with your current position and know that if you go to college you can get a much more interesting job. Or you may like your current role/company and want to attend college to advance within the company. There is no wrong answer. You need to take a look at your current opportunities and go with those.
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Andrew’s Answer

The most important question for you at this point is what do you want to do in the future? What is your future career preference? Would you like to explore the possibility of taking some tests to figure out where your heart lies as far as jobs are concerned?

There is a cost associated with going to college, both in time and money. It is not wise to go to college just for the sake of going to college because so many people have gone.

This is an important life decision. Talk with your school career counselor to explore the appropriate options.
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