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What are the steps to become a Pharmacist?

Currently 16, 10th grade #pharmacists #pharmacist #pharmacy #job #medicine


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fred’s Answer

In the U.S. there are two paths I'm aware of. The more traditional role is to first go to college/university, and get a bachelors. Generally you would study something like biology or chemistry. I believe you can major in just about anything, but something in the sciences seems more appropriate. Then you'd go to pharmacy school, which is (I believe) another four years. That gets you your PharmD degree, after which you may have to intern first...

Some schools also have a 6 year program. This combines the 4 year undergraduate with the 4 years of pharmacy school into just six year. You graduate sooner, but the risk is that if you change your mind and decide pharmacist is not the role for you, very few (if any) of your courses will transfer to another degree.

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Leonora’s Answer

There are 2 types of pharmacy schools in US: 0-6 and professional program that you enter after completing a bachelors degree. 0-6 is a type of program that you start straight after high school. You might complete prerequisites like math, chemistry, physics and so on with other students, or be on a separate campus and take all the classes with your cohort from the beginning. Alternatively, you can complete a bachelors degree and then apply for the graduate professional program that will take another 4 years to complete. Either path you chose, remember to explore all the career options because there are so many paths for a pharmacist to take beyond the typical work in a pharmacy store or a hospital. Good luck!

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Marlena’s Answer

Check the pharmacy school requirements at different colleges you may be interested in. Some may admit you directly to the school of pharmacy while others may require an additional application a year and a half or so after you begin college. If you don’t make it in, you can try again another year, but you’ll likely end up spending at least another year in college and may want to get an undergraduate degree first. I’d recommend chemistry or biology, but general health sciences can be applied to many job opportunities. Good luck!

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Krystyna’s Answer

In addition to the schooling mentioned in the previous answers, it's just good to be aware that you will likely be required to do a lot of practical experience and extracurricular activities in addition to attending classes. Most schools also require some amount of volunteer work. Depending on what type of practice you decide you'd like to pursue, you may even consider residency after graduating.

Prior to being accepted to pharmacy school you'll also have to complete the PCAT as well as interview at pharmacy schools. Once you complete pharmacy school there is also the licensure exam, as well as a state law exam. These are a few of the additional steps beyond schooling that will have to be completed to become a pharmacist.

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