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Music Production Tools?

For a music producer at the beginners level, what would you recommend as a "starter pack"? What kits, software, drum pads, music packs and etc. would you recommend #music-production #music #music-performance

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Alex’s Answer

Starting out, I'd suggest a lot of free software. Nowadays, free stuff can be very high-quality. Plus, if you decide you dislike something you're using, at least you haven't poured a bunch of money into it. For a DAW (digital audio workstation), you could try Reaper, which is fully-featured and has an unlimited free trial (or $40 license). You can record and edit audio and MIDI pretty much any way you can imagine. For sounds, Spitfire Audio has their free LABS software with new sampled instruments added regularly, and Orchestral Tools has a similar system called SINEfactory. On top of that, if you Google something like "free sound packs" and "free VST instruments", you'll find plenty of resources. I'd start there, and as you figure out what sort of music you truly love creating/producing, you'll naturally discover what other tools you need. But the best piece of advice I can give is to not get too carried away with collecting too many sounds or pieces of software, but fully mastering the ones you have. And remember, what works best for someone else may not work best for you, so take any advice with a grain of salt. I wish you luck with your music!
Thank you comment icon Completely agree with Alex Niedt. I will only add this. Most DAW's provide you with generally the same features and recording quality. What makes the greater difference is their individual USER INTERFACE. In other words, how things are set up within the DAW to facilitate navigation and implementation of resources, features and processes. So, ease of use is directly influenced by how comfortable you feel working with a particular DAW. There are many other finer details that will become apparent as you gain production experience. Get started with Alex's suggestions. Those are very powerful tools. Israel Tanenbaum
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Gaurang’s Answer

If you have an ipad/mac, a good option is MusicGarage. It has good options for creating loops and adding packs.
For Ipad you are stuck with an Aux connector (older macs/ipad) fbut you would need some connectors for the USB-C/lightening connectors to connect a Mic or Guitar or any other instrument

FL Studio is paid but it is really an industrial strength software for music production.
It has both mac and windows support, and support to aatach multiple instruments . You still need connectors (usb/etc)
But would really recommend it!
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Nicholas’s Answer

Logic Pro X on Mac, plus either an AKAI MPK Mini Play or an M-Audio OxyGen Pro 49; Depending on preference for accuracy vs portability.
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Kevin’s Answer

Hi Malachi,

As stated above, it depends on your budget. I teach Apple’s Logic Pro X at a community college that provides the computer and the software. In that case, use Logic and GarageBand (they each come with thousands of loops), so that you could transfer projects between school and studio. But when I figure in what the students are using currently , you have to consider Ableton, FL Studios and other software that works well with hardware instruments like Maschine, Akai, and other controllers. If you are in a mid to larger studio, you might often be working with Pro Tools.

Do you currently have a computer? PC or Mac? That will guide you towards certain DAWs (digital audio workstations).

What are you producing? This will help guide you, as well. If you are producing commercial music, electronic vs acoustic, podcasts, voiceover, sound effects, etc., there are software programs and effects that will lend themselves better to different areas. If I was a dj, I would use Ableton live + plugins. If I was going to record that dj, I would use Logic Pro and ask for a stereo feed and put up a couple of high quality microphones to capture the room. You can actually buy some good USB microphones from manufacturers like AKG or something similar, and then you can buy a 2 or 4 input analog-to-digital converter to plug in the instruments.

Recording more or different instruments requires different answers.

Good luck!

Kevin recommends the following next steps:

Keep researching!
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