Skip to main content
4 answers
4
Asked 435 views

What is it like to major in the arts and what are they?

I know there are many different kinds of arts to major in college. I was curious as what some are and what it's like majoring in one that is not commonly known as a primary academic subject.

#major

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

4

4 answers


1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Doc’s Answer

Anouk do you enjoy taking pictures of people, things, or places? Perhaps you enjoy flipping around your camera and trying new angles and lighting techniques to capture an incredible picture? If so, you may consider becoming a photographer, a career in the arts. Depending on how far your passion and expertise go, you may even be qualified for TV, film, or production work. A film degree program provides in-depth training in the various aspects of making a movie including cinematography, editing, sound, mise-en-scene, scriptwriting, and directing. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the historical, political, and social aspects of film and will be able to employ cinematic language in film criticism and analysis. Undergraduate programs typically prepare students for entry-level roles in the film industry or for graduate studies. Graduates can find film degree jobs in production companies, broadcast media, advertising, public relations, nonprofit organizations, and academia. They can focus on topics like camera work, editing, directing, and other facets of video production.

CINEMATOGRAPHERS – Are responsible for achieving the desired visual aesthetics of a film. They work with directors and camera operators to determine the appropriate angles, lighting, color palette, camera movement, and other elements of a shot. Using the script as a guide, they may decide on lighting plans, choose what types of cameras to use and how to employ filters to achieve the desired look, all in the service of telling a story.

FILM & VIDEO EDITORS – Ensure that a movie or video presents a coherent and engaging narrative. They use editing software to arrange video footage in a smooth sequence, cut out unnecessary and distracting parts, work with sound editors to insert audio files such as music and voice-over, and apply appropriate sound and visual effects. They may use techniques to trick the audience, build tension or make sure a joke lands well. They review the final content to make sure that there are no technical errors or gaps in the story.

PRODUCERS & DIRECTORS – Although their primary duties do not pertain to marketing, producers and directors still play an important role in the marketing of a production. Producers typically need to market the film they are working to raise funding for the production. They oversee the financial decisions pertaining to the film. Directors handle more of the creative decisions, including directing actors and crew members. They are also involved in helping to promote or market the movie before its release with interviews and promotional appearances. Both positions usually require some work experience in the field and at least a bachelor's degree in film, journalism, art management or a related field.

Hope this was helpful Anouk

Doc recommends the following next steps:

Most film programs require students to complete some type of experiential learning component such as fieldwork or an internship. While some regions offer students many hands-on opportunities in their backyards, others might complete summer internships in a different state where filmmakers are more concentrated, such as California or New York. Regardless of where you choose to undertake this component, use it as an opportunity to grow in your craft and meet professionals in the industry.
Like many creative fields, landing cinematography jobs is often a factor of experience and who one knows. Unlike traditional industries where jobs are posted on career boards, roles for cinematographers are frequently filled through word of mouth or existing relationships with professionals working in film. Film students and graduates should meet g as many industry colleagues as possible, be it through a minimum wage assistant role, a volunteer position or by attending events sponsored by professional associations in the industry.
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Miranda’s Answer

Great that you're interested in the arts! There are a TON of options in the creative field! I, personally, majored in graphic design and now do that for a living. It's a wonderful field where you can use your creative and visual skills to create all kinds of value for people. Just in the world of graphic design, people can create logos, websites, illustrations, animation with motion graphics, apparel, advertisements, graphics for shops or stores, books, menus, business cards, brochures, and anything in between! I found that graphic design is a great way to utilize my skills with art, while learning a lot of great employable skills that many businesses are in need of.

If you major in graphic design or any other similar art-based major, expect a lot of project-based work. While other students are cramming for exams, you may be up late working to finish up a project instead. It's a bit different style of learning because you can expect to do a lot more creating, implementing, and presenting your work rather than just taking tests. I also find that you're bound to learn a bit more hands-on, tangible skills (ie. learning to use photoshop or something similar) that you can use in the real world rather than some other majors where you may just be learning theories and facts.

Now, graphic design is the major I can speak of from personal experience, however there are many art-based or creative majors as well. You may consider Interior Design (it's more than just decorating, a lot of people end up designing whole store experiences), Industrial/Product design if you have a bit of an engineering mindset along with your creative brain, or Photography or Animation if you're interested in more technical side of art. Also the fine arts are always an option if you're set on sticking with traditional mediums (painting, drawing, ceramics, photography etc.). If you go the route of traditional fine arts, it's never too early to build a social media following and open an online shop to get yourself started! (also there's of course preforming arts, music, dance, and the likes, but I know very little about those, so I won't speak to them!)

All this to say – the arts are a wonderful field, full of many opportunities, (don't believe the myth that all of us end up "starving artists", it's so very far from the truth, especially in this day and age.) do some digging and find what speaks to you!
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Cheryl’s Answer

I have two daughters both very interested in art. Some fields we discovered instead of just being an artist is art education and art therapy. There is alot of openings to art therapy using art as a form helping people cope.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Kevin’s Answer

Great question! For background, I went to a small liberal arts school in Pennsylvania and one of my majors is an Art major in Graphic and Interactive Design. At our school, we provide six primary tracks for members of our arts programs. I will be defining "the arts" as the art department, and will not include the music and dance programs that are often considered part of the wider arts because I have minimal experience with those areas.

1. Studio Art — This is what most people think of as "the arts" and includes things like drawing, painting, sculpting, etc.
2. Graphic Design and Interactive Design — This is the most common major at the school I went to as it includes the most common arts careers. This track focuses on visual communication — so how do we craft an advertisement or website or book cover that influences an individual to take the action we would like or to notice information of importance.
3. Photography-Media — As the name implies, this focuses on photography. The important note is the "-Media" is a reference to photojournalism and magazine photography. As a result, this track ends up focusing on how to use photography to compliment the written word.
4. Art History and Criticism — This focuses on the history and context of art. The individuals I knew who went through this program were pursuing archeology and museum work, where they would be able to work more closely with historic artwork.
5. Art Education — How to teach art, focused on preparing teachers for the unique nature of teaching art.

The best thing I did was ask to meet with the head of the art department to discuss what I liked, and they helped me find the path that made sense for me. In my case, it was a double major, pairing linguistics with art for my goals. Other individuals paired their art degrees with computer science to help them meet their goals of being an animator for Pixar.

The most important thing I want to say though is that having an art major doesn't prevent you from changing your career in the future (either in school or after you have finished). It will often require more work than it would for someone with a degree, but it is certainly possible.

Kevin recommends the following next steps:

Reach out to your local community college's art department head
Speak with your high school counselor about what you are interested in.
0