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How is it like to go for a Masters degree?

I know I want to go for a bachelors degree but I'm not sure if I should go for a masters. I want to know how hard or complicated it is to go for a masters degree. #degree


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Catherine’s Answer

I went for a bachelor's and master's in the same subject area (biomedical engineering) so I can tell you about the difference I saw between the two levels of the same subject. I found that my undergrad contained a variety of expansive work. I felt more pressure to handle more courses at once and be able to juggle short term assignments that often overlapped with each other. I found that while I enjoyed my major, there were certain courses that I enjoyed more than others. For my masters, the classes were longer and not as often so your free time outside of the lecture could be used to dive deeper into the subject material. The courses are more specialized so I was able to build on the classes that I enjoyed in undergrad and expand further. Even if the subject matter is more complex, I found that because I enjoyed what I was learning about it becomes easier to put the effort into learning the material. The assignments were more long term and also more manageable in my opinion. I even took a few master's courses as undergrad electives and was able to finish my master's the following school year.

This was just my experience with the particular bachelors/masters curriculums I took. To gain a full idea of what a bachelors/masters path would look like for you, I would advise that you keep asking people what their experience has been, since it is truly different for everyone. The more experience paths you are exposed to, the better you can decide what's best for you. I personally did not decide to pursue a master's until my senior fall semester so you do have some time to think about it!

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Dina’s Answer

Hi Katrina.
I would say finish your bachelor degree and worry later on about the master's degree. step by step. master isn't complicated as you are describing it's just a continuity to your bachelor studies or new courses that could help you gain more knowledge and support you through your career. but IF the question here is:
should you work or should you study after my bachelor ? career decisions are not easy but I can tell you that both options have a lot of good reasons going for them. write down the pros of each one and decide later. few years ago I asked myself the same question and I set clear points to discuss :
1- am I ready to go back to university after getting a work experience or would it be difficult to be back to the routine of learning?
2- masters' degree will make me more qualified to a certain job and will make me earn more money in the long run.
3-if my goal is to get a PhD, than I must go through the process sooner or later.
4- some careers will require a master's degree
5- work experience can help me figure out what to study next and that's very important because work reality is different from my studies and expectations.
finally, going to masters degree is like going to bachelors degree. you don't get to know until you experience it. so set your goals in the first step. when you work toward a goal you know where and what are you going and you know what to expect

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Simeon’s Answer

A master's degree tends to be one or two fewer years than a bachelor's degree to get, but the classes are more difficult and usually require more involved assignments such as papers, essays, and presentations. Whether a masters is worth it or not depends on the career you're looking to get into, but chances are that if it is not a required degree, then it is often not worth the extra years postponing the beginning of your career.

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Katie’s Answer

I would echo the sentiment above - work towards completing your Bachelor's degree first and you can go back for your Masters once you have started in a career field. The courses in a Master's program are a continuation of what you have previously studied, or you may decide to study something completely different. Many programs are structured now for working adults, and even though it is a time commitment, you would be able to work full-time and balance the course load. Another plus is that some employers will offer tuition assistance or grant programs as well which can help offset the cost.


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Veronica’s Answer

It depends on what you want to pursue your Master's degree in. Don't forget use the following steps.

Veronica recommends the following next steps:

Do your research
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Apply for financial aid
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