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the process of becoming an engineer?

I always wanted to be an engineer. #engineer

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Muhammad’s Answer

This question can be addressed in two ways: formal path to becoming an engineer vs. how to prepare for an engineering career. A lot of my colleague have addressed the 2nd part in great detail hence I'll just address the first.

Step 1 - Graduate high school with an above average GPA & have some extracurricular reflecting your interest in the field.
Step 2 - Take the SAT/ACT exams with above average score, specially in match/science.
Step 3 - Apply to colleges of interest that cater to the chosen engineering field. Consider applying to colleges that are at the fore-front of research for your respective engineering field. This will help with future education & also with employment after a degree. The reason being that industries generally partner with colleges to perform research for them. Hence that company/industry may focus it's recruitment with their partner colleges. E.g. Ohio State is big in automotive research and all the major companies (GE, Honda etc.) hire from OSU.
Step 4 - Choose your career path. This can be working in industry (consulting or OEMs) and/or academia

Depending on the career path, you must've done internships/research along with your degree to show your interest. For academia the next step would be to apply for masters which would require a GRE with above average scores. For industry if you are pursueing consulting I would recommend getting a Professional Engineering license. Which require passing your Fundamentals of Engineering exam after college and gaining the needed experience.

These steps should keep you busy for a while. good luck!
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It depends on what type of engineer you wanted to be. Explore interests when you are you and purse them as a career then you will enjoy working as an engineer.

If you interested in building stuff or curious about how things work try to take them apart and see what is inside or take the help of internet.

That might help you become what kinda engineer you wanted to be.

Then apply to the universities which add offering those engineering degrees. My only advice is get a lot of hands on experience that wi help you become a better engineer.
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Rebecca’s Answer

There are different subjects in engineering, e.g. Electric & Electronic Engineer, Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Computer Engineering, etc. Different kinds of engineering does different kinds of work and have different entry requirement in the universities.
Firstly, you may need to identify which engineering field(s) you are interested. You can explore more information online or speak to someone who is working in that field or students studying the subject to acquire more understanding.
After you have shortlisted one or two engineering subjects, you may explore which universities offer / has high ranking on that subject and determine the entry criteria.
When you graduate from the university, you may need to practice in the industry for a few years before you can obtain the charter engineering status. Please check with the professional engineering bodies in your country for the qualification.
Hope this helps! Good Luck!
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Rudy’s Answer

I knew I wanted to be an engineer when I was 10 years old, so I get your question and passion.

My advise based on personal experience achieving my dream of being an engineer, the process was:

1. Find out what area of engineering or what type of engineer you want to be. It is a very wide field.
2. Learn more about the subject/field - if you like SW engineering then learn a programming language and play with it.
3. start planning for college - you will need a formal education / engineering degree in your choice subject
4. once in college take internships - excellent way to get some early experience, make some money and "test drive" the role

Some Universities and companies also host summer engineering camps/activities for young people who are interested. This maybe a great way for you to get some hands on exposure and help you identify what type of engineer you want to be

good luck and welcome to the club!
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Shawn’s Answer

All of the above answers are true.

Yes, mathematics are essential. I have spent a whole career in the R&D world, so many would believe I am always using high level, complex mathematics. That is infrequent, and I can always reread a text on how to do it unlike in exams. Most everyone around me uses basic Calculus: derivatives are the local slope of measured data and integrals are areas under the curve of measured data using Left, Right, or Center rule. A simple Excel sheet will do these Calculus calculations.

The frustration is often times replaced with uplifting emotions when you are part of the solution that has eluded you to date. For me, I literally find the solution once I am exhausted and relaxing in a shower. The light bulb comes on, and I can’t wait to implement it. It’s quite a rush. Just remember engineering is always about solving problems by making compromises (can’t be a perfectionist or nothing is achieved). This is the most frustrating thing; I.e. I can’t eliminate all failures of a part due to costs, so I accept eliminating most failure modes for a small cost increase to maintain profits. Profits are the essence of business which is why eliminating all failure modes is not possible.

Engineering is great when you determine which form truly aligns with your likes. If taking machines apart, understanding how an A/C works, or moving fluids appeals to you Mechanical is probably best. If you like building structures (buildings, bridges, roadways, dams) or flood mitigation, Civil is probably best. I won’t go on further for all the other disciplines, because I hope you can see where I am going.

We will always require more engineers tomorrow than needed today which are already short in supply. This bodes well for your career.
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Leo’s Answer

Rudy's right, I'm just going to add more information:

* Figure out if you like Math, as quickly as possible. As an Engineer you'll need Math all the time. Learn to love it, or don't even bother.
* Figure out if you like Science. Engineering is the application of science to solving practical problems.
* Learn to deal with frustration. Engineering is hard. The second part of the definition above implies you'll have to deal with problems. This is what you'll be doing all the time: solving problems. For an engineer, these are usually *difficult technical problems*. Very often you'll think you can solve a problem only to stumble upon a new one. Then you solve that, and a new problem appears, and so on. This should tell you that you will be exposed to constant frustration. Learn to deal with it.

The great thing about being an engineer is that, eventually, you'll be solving difficult technical problems that have a practical impact on people's lives. There is an immense satisfaction in knowing that you solved (or, more often, helped solve) an important problem that made life better for others. If this is the sort of thing you'd like to do, then welcome!
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