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What are some Pros and Cons about Aerospace Engineering

I just want to learn about engineering overall Aerospace Engineering

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Brayden’s Answer

Hello!

I would never say there are specific pros or cons regarding engineering discipline because all engineering requires some type of interest to initially want to get into the discipline. Unlike a product where theres advantages or disadvantages, every job involves things that people dont like but its ultimately up to you to try and make the things that arent fun, funner.

Overall engineering on a large scale is a great discipline if you enjoy problem solving, working with others, and are comfortable with not knowing the answer all the time. Engineering is something that presents problems that can take years to solve because some of the concepts and problems are so complex. Specifically in aerospace engineering there are a ton of things that push the limits of our understanding of how the universe works so that can be challenging at times. But when you ultimately when you find a solution for your problem, that outweighs all the hardworking by 10x.

When choosing an engineering discipline find one that interests you most because when you can no longer look at work as a means to make money you will have then found happiness because you no longer will dread going to work and will enjoy all aspects of life.
Thank You! Gianni D.
Spot on! great advice Robin Jacob
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Mickael’s Answer

I agree with Brayden in general, though I can see some domains having advantages and disadvantages. For example, in aerospace, you may not be able to work remotely. This is less and less true as computers are used to model a lot before doing anything physical, yet there might be things you simply can't. While being a software engineer is possible almost all the time.

But I am not sure I can give you pros and cons:
(1) because I only had 3 months internship 20+ years ago
(2) because what could be a pros for me can be a cons for you :)

So that goes back to Brayden's answer. Engineering means solving problems in a domain with other peoples because 2 brains are better than one. Aerospace probably deals with materials, forces, mechanic (I missed many there) and there are probably tons of researches about how to reduce fuel consumption, reuse materials sent in space and many others. The only question is:
Do you like solving those problems in a team?
Do you like thinking more than doing?


Thank you! Gianni D.
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Peter’s Answer

Aerospace engineering can often require handling a lot of pressure, and not infrequently disappointment: a project like building a new spacecraft, or developing and selling a new airliner, are big bets with high risk as well as high reward. Projects start hard, staff up to handle hoped-for success, and then get either a red light or a green light. Years of work may turn into decades of involvement in a satisfying project, or may…not.

That said, of the many people I know in this field, ranging from satellite control algorithm developers to astronauts, none of them seems to wish they'd done something else. They love what they do and they are almost always engaged by their work.

Don't think too narrowly about what you'll get to do with an aerospace engineering education. MIT's department in this subject addresses it as a multi-systems discipline that only happens to include aerospace applications: it's described as offering "a deeper level of understanding and skill in a field of engineering comprising multiple disciplinary areas (e.g., autonomous systems, computational engineering, engineering management), or a greater understanding and skill in an interdisciplinary area (e.g., energy, environment and sustainability, or space exploration)." If you look at a modern automobile, a submersible craft for undersea research or industrial tasks, or any number of other complex products, the integration of hardware and software and thermodynamics and fluid mechanics and control system behaviors that's required in aerospace will also be seen in these other non-flying areas.

Since your question said you were interested in "engineering overall," I'll add that some of the things I've said above also apply to a discipline like Civil Engineering: big projects with substantial uncertainty and risk, need to integrate many disciplines, and opportunity to produce work that changes entire communities. Think big.
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Lane’s Answer

I'm an Aerospace Engineer by education, and have worked in the aerospace industry for over 25 years. My career has mostly been as a structural analyst, what they call a 'stress guy' in the industry, and even director level and VP of Engineering.

If you love aircraft, this is a great field, and it can be hard work as it really taxes your mental skills at times. I have worked on aircraft from as small as a two seater to jumbo jets, and helicopters.

Some of the perks are that I have been able to work as a flight test engineer, where I got to ride on the aircraft (helicopters and VIP aircraft) as part of a test program. Of course, after all that, the data still has to be compiled, processed and written into a report.

One of the downsides of the industry (especially at the larger companies) is that they tend to through waves of hiring/layoffs every few years. You might get lucky and get passed over, but once you get laid off, it tends to happen to you more often as you are now 'low on the totem pole' at any new company you join.

Even that has its upside though as you may wind up with a wider variety of opportunities (I even got to work in Germany for about 16 months) than those who stay in one place.
Thank you! Gianni D.
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