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What are the most used computer programming languages in your work environment?

I'm curious as to what languages I would be using if I went into this field. I've learned some of the basics of Python in my AP Computer Science course at my school but that is about it. I'd like to get an edge going into college , and make sure I know the needed languages before entering the working world. #computer-science #stem #computer-programming

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Eric’s Answer

As the others have said, though there is also JavaScript for Web development and Swift for iOS apps.


However, really, what you want to do is become skilled enough with programming languages that you can usually pick up new ones with just a few hours' work. That way you will be willing to apply to a job that you like the look of, even if it happens to involve a language you don't currently know, like, say, Perl.


I have found that learning about three languages, with different paradigms, does wonders for this. Python is a great start. Learn a statically-typed, object-oriented language like C++ or Java, so you are used to a much more rigid and formulaic system. This will also likely make some of Python's decisions with classes and objects make a bit more sense. Then, learn a functional language, such as Scheme, Haskell, or Clojure. You don't need to put too much work into these, especially as they are less widely used in the industry, but they will really open your mind and let you see more of how programming is expressing ideas to a computer, not just using particular syntax. At that point, you can probably pick a language at random and get started in it pretty quickly, and you should try that out from time to time.This is how you get the resumes that you'll frequently see for programmers which have ten or more languages listed.


With this approach you can also come up with personal projects, and pick an interesting language you have less experience with it, and try making the project. You will likely learn a lot, and if it is complete enough you'll be able to list it on your resume as another accomplishment (plus, I have found that CS classes alone in a college usually aren't enough for you to really, deeply, understand programming to the level you'll want for a job).


Good luck!

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Joanne’s Answer

Add python to Adin's list.

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Adin’s Answer

Hi Bryce,


I would suggest you to learn Python completely and I believe in your school you learnt just the basics and I would highly recommend the following programming languages as well:



  • C

  • C++

  • Java

  • SQL would be an added advantage

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Diego’s Answer

At Twitter we heavily use Scala, which is a very modern and elegant language. Beyond that, C++, Python, Java and Javascript as mentioned above. When you know 5 or 6 languages, then the other ones are easy :-)

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