2 answers

What are some of the common careers in math-related fields?

Asked New York, New York

Math is my favorite subject in school, but I don't know what kind of careers there are in math-related fields. Could someone provide some information? #math #career-options

2 answers

Matt’s Answer

Updated

Math is a tool that is indispensable in a huge number of careers. Scientists (think Physics, Chemistry, or Biology) are using math everyday in their labs, engineers of all kinds (aerospace, computer, electric engineers, etc, etc) constantly need to use math as they design and test systems, and financial analysts rely on math as they try to create models which explain and predict the stock market and the economy (with varying degrees of success as recent events have shown!). But all sorts of careers which you might think of as less quantitative than those already listed are using math all the time too. Social scientists like economists, experimental psychologists, and political scientists need to understand and use statistics as they design experiments and interpret their results. Computer programmers need to understand the most efficient way to design and implement their programs. Companies like Facebook, Google, and Twitter employ large teams of people who have math backgrounds in order to help them decide how to organize and interpret the data they have and to figure out how to sell ads using their data. In fact, many advertisers use math and statistics to understand and better target different demographics.

Math is useful because of (not in spite of) how abstract it is. When you are learning math you are learning new ways to think and new approaches to solving problems. This is a skill that is valued in every possible career. Common math careers include becoming a teacher, a scientist, an actuary or working for a financial firm (banks, hedge funds, credit card companies, etc). There are all sorts of companies you may not have considered though which value knowledge of math including the CIA, NASA, Apple, Microsoft, Ebay, the Census Bureau, the IRS, and all sorts of large companies like AT&T or IBM have large teams of people helping them decide how to run their businesses more efficiently (this field is called operations research). Math is a field that opens all kinds of doors, and it is only becoming more important as our societies' focus and reliance on technology and data continues to increase.

Updated
This answer is perfect. I really believe I will consider double majoring in college with math and probably physics. Thank you very much. This honestly helped me take a step closer to deciding on my future career.
Updated
Hooray for math! One of the best pieces of advice I got as a college freshman was to take as much math as I could handle, because you'll find a way to use it. I applaud your ambitious approach to double major but I would be careful about "burning out". Just know that when you are struggling with math, that it's not really easy for anyone when they first start, and a lot of people who are considered "prodigies" really just got a whole lot of experience under their belt when they were really young. Best of luck, in math and in life

Vijay’s Answer

Updated Tempe, Arizona

Now a days all the companies getting large amount of data from web traffic. It was real challenge for these companies to identify pattern and analytics out of it. Imagine number of clicks on Twitter, Linkedin, eBay, Amazon and Walmart on daily basis. These companies struggling to find user pattern/ prediction out of this huge volume of data sets. These companies looking for the people good at basics (which is "Math"). Also there are lot of demand for data scientists in these companies.

This explores an opportunity in related areas such as Machine learning, Social networking, Predictive Analytics Statistical modeling & Etc

This might grow phenominaly in near future. So your interest/expertise in Math will get a confirmed spot on these companies. All the Best!