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What’s a good career/major if you absolutely sucks at everything related to math and numbers but you are pretty good at everything else?

I’ve been struggling a lot in my advanced math classes, but I did exceptionally well in all of my other classes, including physics. Is there any computer related major that doesn’t involve too much math?(No calculus involved please) #math #mathematics #career-options #computer


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Matthew’s Answer

Hey Bryan! Thanks for the question! I also had some trouble in my advanced math classes, especially calculus. I ended up getting a BS in Civil Engineering and MBA though. Don't let those classes derail you from something you really might want to do. The reality is you won't be using advanced math on a regular basis in most Engineering and Computer Science careers. These classes are a great foundation though.

My advice is to first assess what really excites you and stay on track towards that passion. Most computer related majors will require you to get through those "core" classes like calc and physics. I ended up finding a couple friends in my classes to study with while also taking advantage of the professor's office hours. I know it's a little different now with COVID, but hopefully you can do it virtually. If you like working with computers and problem solving, I would stick it out and get some additional help to get through those classes. It'll be worth it in the end!

Thank you! Bryan Z.

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John’s Answer

Bryan as a market researcher, you'll need good communication and data analysis skills (no math calculations needed, just interpreting the math calculations), along with a bachelor's degree. Professional certification requires passing an exam, and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) says it is a good step towards career advancement. Tremendous growth is anticipated in the marketing research analysis field through 2028. The average Market Research Analyst salary in the United States is $88,00o as of July 27, 2020, but the range typically falls between $81,000 and $100,000. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

MARKET RESEARCH ANALYST JOB DESCRIPTION
Market research analysts help companies and organizations understand their competitors' activities and their customers' wants and needs. Market research analysis requires strong skills in communication and data analysis. Those interested in this career should be prepared to gather information and present it to clients. Determining which goods and services are in demand and the best rate or price to charge for these products is a core function of a market research analyst's job, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Market research analysts are also typically responsible for presenting survey findings to their clients. This includes translating complex numerical survey results into a package that is easy to understand. Graphs and text translations of the findings are commonly used to help clients understand survey results. In addition to taking surveys, market research analysts can be responsible for keeping track of client industry trends and general marketing trends.

MARKET RESEARCH ANALYST EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS
Market research analysts are expected to hold a minimum of a bachelor’s degree. These degrees can range from a variety of fields, such as statistics, math, computer science and business administration, communication, and so on. These programs vary widely in their contents as they prepare students for a wide range of occupations. Even so, these programs, typically lasting roughly four years, often instill in their students a variety of business practices, mathematical abilities, and communication skills. It is also possible for students to pursue master’s level educations in psychology, marketing research, and consumer psychology. Much like with bachelor’s level educations, these programs differ considerably. More advanced courses will typically emphasize aspects such as data analysis and working with software programs. The advantage in obtaining a master’s level education over a bachelor’s is that people with the former will often be awarded with more technical research and leadership positions.

Bryan high school students wishing to become market research analysts should look to take classes that aim to improve skills relevant to this field. This makes classes in english, communication, computer science, statistics, and business invaluable. In addition, courses in public speaking and performing arts can aid students develop more confidence while appearing in front of others and hone their delivery of information and overall presentation considerably. To be successful as a marketing research analyst, you must have specific soft skills, which are personal qualities you were born with or acquired through life experience.

John recommends the following next steps:

Verbal Communication: Excellent speaking skills will allow you to present the results of your research to clients and colleagues.
Reading Comprehension: You will have to be able to understand a large number of documents, including research reports and survey responses.
Critical Thinking: As a marketing research analyst, you will have to decide between different strategies to market products. Your ability to compare and contrast different approaches to make an educated decision is essential.
Listening: Strong listening skills are essential to understanding your clients' needs and the scope of the projects on which you are working.
Analytical Skills: Your research will yield a lot of data that you must be able to analyze, understand, and from which you must draw conclusions. This part of your job will also require you to be detail oriented.

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John’s Answer

Most careers require some math but not advanced math. Ex., business, sales/marketing, Manufacturing, Legal, etc. Many positions in Engineering only require the advanced math to get through the classes but in real life most engineers never use the advanced math.

I had problems with math in High school and didn't realize until later on that it was the way is was being taught that made it hard for me. I found out how to learn it on my own and then did much better at it. Some people just learn differently. Same with Chemistry. Teachers always taught it as if we already knew the language/words etc. and just didn't make sense to me until I started to learn it on my own and talked to tutors. If you're doing well in physics that tells me that you can do well in math.

Thank you! Bryan Z.

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Zhijian’s Answer

In my opinion, if you are really good in other areas, you can't be bad in mathematics. You just need spend more time to understand the mathematics concepts before doing the work. For your career, there are lots of things you can do. Software development is a very good one. You can do lots of interesting things and it pays really well.

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Ebony’s Answer

Hello! I totally understand as I was really bad at math as well. I found that I was a lot better with my hands and ended up at a vocational school for electronics technology. I went to college right after high school, and basically stair stepped in to my master's degree. This gave me the chance to start something that I knew would be valuable while I figured out what I wanted to do without all the math :).
Hope that helps!

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Kaan’s Answer

Most answers took the part in the question which is "advanced math." However it is also indicated "if you absolutely sucks at everything related to math and numbers." My advice contrary to most others would be that computer science/engineering or other engineering fields may not be the best option. The reason being that it is not really the math itself but the mathematical reasoning is important in computer science/engineering. You may not have it and it is perfectly fine!

The question asked "what is a good career/major." Well there are many of course. I will give you an interesting one which is Law School. Yes Law School. How is that since probably it would not have anything to do with computers.

Well, a friend of mine went to law school. He is also very interested in computers. But I think he was not good in engineering, math, etc. so he chose to go to social sciences, which of course makes perfect sense. But because he is interested in computers still (not programming and such but applications, operating systems like Linux etc.) he went to a doctorate program in law school specializing cyber law (or cyber crime law). This is an important area and if you are good at it you may earn a very good living. You would not need any math at all but you would need to still understand the computing technology, how it is used, and how it is secured. Today an increasing number of companies buy cyber insurance (yes insurance may be another good field) and these contracts need a lawyer who understand technology and cyber security. Whenever there is a cyber attack on a reasonable size company, there are lawsuits and of course lawyers get involved.

As you see you can even find a social science field that require extensive knowledge of computing technology without math.

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Izabella’s Answer

Hi Bryan,

I'm going to be completely honest with you, at least at my university, every major that was cited in these answers require that you take an advanced math course such as Calc. Engeneering, Business, Econ, Marketing and others require you to take calc. If you're interested in any one of them and have a passion for physics, if I were you I would just take the challenge. Study hard and you can achieve anything is my motto. The majority of universities have learning centers as well which are kind of like free tutors (students who have gotten an A or above in the class). There are many resources for calc. However, for majors in engeneering and math I don't think that you'll get by with not liking math. You can not like math in majors such as business, econ and some others which have a heavy mix between humanities and mathematics.

Let me know if you have anymore questions. Good luck!

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Elle’s Answer

Why are you sending yourself into a lifetime of certain misery by pursuing something that clearly isn't your strength? If you're going to end up doing something, you have to be at least naturally inclined towards doing it. It does require some talent. If you can't do math, that's fine. Do something else. There are plenty of lucrative careers out there that do not require advanced mathematics. I have mentored students who were pressured into a career path by their families when they were failing out of university because it wasn't their strength. It's time to assess your strengths and do some research into alternate careers. By the way, I made it to an ivy league school without taking a single calculus class. Just saying.

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Alfredo’s Answer

Bryan,

Focus on what you enjoy doing or would like to do professionally. If your path does deal with math, as most things do, you have to focus on mastering the basics first before moving on to more advanced things. Even if it is challenging, take your time to master concepts and do not give up. In time you will be able to overcome it all.

If you do not think the path leads to anything related to math, then you will have more time to focus on those other things. I would focus more on what you would like to do because once you determine that you will have the motivation to overcome the challenges.

Best of luck!

Thank you! Bryan Z.

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Alison’s Answer

Hi Bryan,
I’m not a computer person myself, but I have some friends who are. My understanding is that going in the direction of programming or IT support will require less math than going towards computer science. “Computer related” is a pretty big world, though. Have you thought about going into management or the business side of “computer related” companies? That would require less math (still some, but less) as well. Also, it’s important to note that you’re not the only one with this concern. Doing a quick google search for computer jobs without math will get you to a lot of advice for and from other students in your situation.
Hope this helps!

Thank you! Bryan Z.

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Sandeep’s Answer

Hello Bryan!
It quite normal to feel like this . Many people feel like they don't like Math and number. I think its not a problem of Math, its problem with how you are taking up the subject. Math is there in every piece of life, if you start looking from that angle you will feel the power.
Math some times make you feel tricky but that the beauty of it. In future if you go in any profession, sooner or later u will come across.
So the best thing is not to avoid it, give it a fight. Try to relate it will practical life, it will be easy in that way for you to handle.
Math is really wonderful, you just need to take it head on.

Good Luck

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RAMESH’s Answer

Bryan,

My basic advice is to go with what is exciting for you and what you think you are good at. But since you are good at Physics, I am surprised you are having a hard time with math. If it some specific branch of math, maybe you can learn it from other sources and see it is not the math that is giving you a problem.


Having said that for a computer-related career, you do not need advanced math. You are not going to hi-fi calculus and differential equations every day at a computer-based career. hence I wouldn't worry too much about that. Basic math and logic skills along with curiosity is more than enough and it seems like you got it.

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Matthew’s Answer

Hey Bryan! Thanks for the question! I also had some trouble in my advanced math classes, especially calculus. I ended up getting a BS in Civil Engineering and MBA though. Don't let those classes derail you from something you really might want to do. The reality is you won't be using advanced math on a regular basis in most Engineering and Computer Science careers. These classes are a great foundation though.

My advice is to first assess what really excites you and stay on track towards that passion. Most computer related majors will require you to get through those "core" classes like calc and physics. I ended up finding a couple friends in my classes to study with while also taking advantage of the professor's office hours. I know it's a little different now with COVID, but hopefully you can do it virtually. If you like working with computers and problem solving, I would stick it out and get some additional help to get through those classes. It'll be worth it in the end!

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