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i want to go to a medical field in college, but how do i choose which one is better for me?

#nursing #medicine #college #healthcare what do i choose?

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Subject: Career question for you

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David’s Answer

From expierence, the only way to really see which field is best suited or you is to get exposure in that field. When I began college I also jumped back and forth from field to field based only on the research I found on the internet. It wasn't until my later years of college, when I was required to complete an internship, that I able to find the right path. I would ask around to family, friends or even your own doctors/medical professionals if you could shadow them to see what they do. I would also go with questions in hand that you can ask the medical professionals.
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Dante’s Answer

See if you can Google a career test to assess your skills.

As for medical fields, you can go to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics to give you a vary of information on medical fields you can choose from pertaining a career. https://www.bls.gov/ooh/

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Matt’s Answer

Hi Laura, I'm not in the medical field myself, but my wife is a medical resident, so I passed your question on to her. Here is her response:

The first thing I would think about what it is about medicine that appeals to you as a way to narrow your focus. If what you enjoy is connecting with people and helping to educate them, then perhaps nursing may be a good field. If high-acuity or high-stress situations appeal to you, you may consider a career in paramedics or emergency medicine. If you're interested in biological research, there are many research paths to take within medicine.

Another thing to consider is how much education and training do you want to have. Would you prefer to be more of a generalist, or focus on some speciality? I agree with Sheila and David that one of the best things you can do is to shadow others. Most professionals that I have reached out to have been more than willing to have me shadow. I recommend reaching out to medical institutions in your area to see if they have a shadow program for careers that might interest you. Best of luck!
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Sheila’s Answer

Hi Laura:

Although I'm not in the medical field, I've researched your question and here's some information for your consideration to help you start your research . . . .

Many students launch their physician or surgeon career goals as undergraduates in a premed program. Medical schools generally require students to have core knowledge of the life and physical sciences -- including Chemistry, Physics, and Biology -- along with subjects such as English and Calculus. Biology was the most prevalent major for physicians and surgeons who were employed in 2015.

Science majors often must supplement their classroom time with laboratory time. Laboratory research is strongly encouraged for premed students. To build research credentials, consider enrolling in a summer program or applying to internships (ie, paid or volunteer) that involve working in a lab, such as those with the National Institutes of Health. Demonstrated commitment to volunteering (ie, paid or volunteer) in the community also is encouraged.

In addition, shadowing a doctor at work is recommended for prospective medical students. Job shadowing involves following a doctor during his or her interactions with patients. Not only can shadowing give you a perspective on the day-to-day realities of providing healthcare, but it also may help confirm your plans. Best of luck to you on your journey!

Sheila recommends the following next steps:

Pursuing a Medical Career • https://www.bls.gov/careeroutlook/2017/article/premed.htm
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