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What coding language is present in most jobs in the computer science field?

I am a high school student interested in majoring in computer science
#computer-science

Thank you comment icon Sometimes students ask about "computer science" but really mean the broader field of technology that is booming these days. I suggest familiarizing yourself (googling) with these terms to make sure you're not narrowing down too soon in your journey: data science data analytics software development UX design database administration project management business intelligence data visualization IT support David Lee

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Ramesh’s Answer

Python is a good first language to learn. As noted different languages are suited to different sub-areas. For instance Python is better suited for application frontend, data science exploration etc., while C++ is better suited for backend.
Surveys such as these provide a summary of popularity: https://www.tiobe.com/tiobe-index/ , https://madnight.github.io/githut/#/pull_requests/2021/3 .
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Patrick’s Answer

Coding languages vary between companies. Most popular are Python, Java, JavaScript, C# but there are plenty of others. Knowing multiple languages is a definite plus as it opens work opportunities. In college, Java is probably the most widely taught. I'd recommend challenging yourself with Python. It is a fun language to work with.
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Marco’s Answer

Brian - I can offer a couple of answers that should help.

There are multiple industry surveys that will point to the most popular or top languages. When I look at those lists, I see languages that make sense - JavaScript, Python, Java and others. Most people that write code learn more than one language because they need to solve different types of problems. Software is everywhere and includes examples like embedded devices, the web pages we see, and the apps we run.

You will find is that academic courses will focus on languages that help show computer science topics such as object oriented development, data structures, and common/useful design patterns. Java and Python are probably popular, and you will learn the disciplines you learn in one language are portable to another.

Let's take an example of sorting numbers. Each language has its own way of storing a list of numbers in something like an array, iterating through the list, and then reorganizing. You have to be precise with the syntax of each language, but the common discipline is what matters.

In my experience, software developers are always learning new things about the language they are using, or a language that is new to them because a new assignment requires it. My best recommendation is you solve some interesting problems in a class or of your own creation, and be ready and open to take that learning onto your next project.

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Hanley’s Answer

Angular (TypeScript, which is an expansion of JavaScript) is taking over in my office right now, however I suggest not being too concerned about which language you learn, although it's probably better to start with a strongly typed language. Focus on learning the fundamentals of programming. All languages contain the same basic structures, If statements, For loops, While loops, Case statements, type declarations, classes, functions, etc. Once you understand how to use them, switching from one language to another isn't necessarily all that hard. I learned to program in C++ in college, then ended up writing asp pages and ColdFusion in my first job. Later I got hired in my current position to write in VB.net, even though I didn't know VB.net and made no attempt to conceal that fact during the job interview. Later I migrated to C# and now I'm learning Angular.

The short version is that if you make computer science your career, you're going to do a fair amount of re-learning periodically. That is the job.

The main exception to this is SQL. Database is generally undertaught in computer science programs relative to the need and how much it actually comes up, and SQL hasn't changed much in decades. Learn SQL and learn it well. It will pay off. Virtually all databases use some minor modification of the main SQL language.
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