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What classes do I take if I want to be a mechanical engineer?

I am still in highschool. I just want to know what future classes I might take. engineer engineering

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Nick’s Answer

Frankie,
Math (Algebra, Geometry & Trigonometry) and Physics are the most useful for an engineering degree. Also focus on your communication and writing. Engineers are usually poor at communicating their ideas and concepts, so being skilled in this area is important for future success. Good luck to you.
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Drew’s Answer

Mathematics and physics. Mechanical engineers learn to use physics as a tool to solve problems. It is just as important to have fun in high school. Enjoy your classmates and other friends. Engineers, including me, generally do not relate well with people. The ability to communicate is a competitive advantage for engineers. Great ideas and solutions lie fallow if others do not recognize their benefit.

Drew recommends the following next steps:

Review Occupational Outlook Handbook for more information on engieneering.
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Gregory’s Answer

For high school - AP Calculus, AP Physics and AP Chemistry. Your 1st and 2nd Year in College will focus on higher level Mathematics - Such as Calc I and II, Differential Equations and most likely Applied Technical Mathematics. You will also delve in to base Mechanical Engineering principles, like Strength of Materials, Statics & Dynamics and AutoCad. My Bachelor's degree was in Aeronautical Engineering, but Mechanical Engineering is at the core of most other Engineering Branches. Good Luck!
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Zachary’s Answer

While I agree that taking the most advanced math and science classes will prepare you for this field, don't forget about your shop class. Hands on experience in welding and understanding the capabilities of manufacturing machines will prove invaluable; plus they are a lot of fun.
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Jenna’s Answer

Agree with Nick and Drew's answers. You will likely need to take calculus, physics, and chemistry in your first year of college. Taking these classes in high school will help you feel more prepared for this, and may also get you college credit if your high school offers AP classes.
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Tyler’s Answer

Take all the Math and Science classes that you can is the obvious part, but I would also encourage you to get some hands on experience where you can. Learning programming, CAD (computer-aided design) and robotics, etc. are all great too. These don't have to be in school, but can be an extra-curricular activity or just on your own. I would also encourage you to see if you can try to get some experience (yes, even in high school) in a local business that allows you to work with some engineers (like an internship, but less formal).
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Francine’s Answer

As everyone has mentioned you will need advanced math and physics in high school and be prepared to take them at an even higher level in college. Technical writing as well as design are also key.
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M. A. Rafe’s Answer

You will have to take a lot of physics and mathematics based courses, as has been mentioned in previous answers, to prepare yourself to take mechanical engineering focused courses. When you have completed all the required courses in high school and first year or two of college, you can expect to take intro to engineering first, then Statics and Engineering Graphics, then Dynamics and Electrical Circuits. For your last two years of your bachelors degree, you can expect to take Thermodynamics, Fluid Mechanics, Mechanics of Materials, Kinematics or Dynamics of machinery, Heat Transfer, mechanical system design, engineering numerical analysis and a few others. You can even choose courses based on your interest or what is available, which are called technical electives. For example, there can be classes focused on Renewable energy, Polymer, CFD, Manufacturing and many others. You look forward to a wide range of math and science related courses as you pursue your mechanical engineering degree. You can also look up one of the universities to see the list of courses you need to take. I've included an example of a set of courses with descriptions as part of your next step.

M. A. Rafe recommends the following next steps:

Feel free to visit: https://www.uttyler.edu/mechanical-engineering/undergraduate/syllabi/
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