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What are the college classes like for a marketing major?

I want to go into International Marketing but I do not like or do well in math classes so I was wondering whether or not the major has a lot of math based classes. #marketing #collegemajor #business

Thank you comment icon As a marketing major, I had to take the fundamental math courses but not too in depth. Alice Y

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David’s Answer

My marketing degrees didn't require a lot of math courses. I only had to take one math class for undergrad to meet the requirements. That being said, there are statistics and finance classes (especially if you get your graduate degree) that tend to be very close to math.
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Joe’s Answer

Hey Maddy,

I also didn't like math much before I became a marketing major. However I found that when I started my degree, the math changed and became much more relevant to my marketing interest. It was less memorization and complex topics that didn't seem relevant, but instead I learned topics that were really interesting because they related to my marketing degree. I would do a little bit of research into the types of math you may encounter in your marketing degree, including Economics, Finance, and Accounting.

If these are still not up your alley, you could consider a major adjacent to Marketing like Communications that traditionally requires less math. A Communications degree is helpful to get you into a variety of roles post-grad, including marketing roles (especially roles like Public Relations) as well as roles in HR, Recruiting, or other areas.

Good luck!
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Taylor’s Answer

Most business degrees in college have some math courses in year 1-2. You will most likely need classes in algebra, statistics, accounting economics and finance. Don't let this discourage you!

Some colleges have prerequisite courses to complete before you are enrolled in the college business program. Once in the business school, you will have course work more specific to marketing (less math).

Consult with your perspective university on the course work path for your major.
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Veronica’s Answer

Hi There - I went to Bryant University and majored in Marketing and Political Science. Math was never my favorite subject but to get a Bachelor of Science in Marketing - I was required to take Accounting I, Accounting II, and Intro to Finance. Math is used much more than you'd think in Marketing professions.
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Jen’s Answer

Hi Maddy! I went to Cal Poly and majored in Journalism/Public Relations which is a very math and science based technical school and didn't have to take any math requisites. I was able to move into tech marketing after that. I was very anxious about math my entire academic life, often shedding tears over it. I love Joe's answer - once I was doing something I loved that required some math skills I found I actually enjoyed it :)
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Anny’s Answer

Hi, Maddy
Some marketing careers do not require math skills, including copywriting, design, and account management. Besides the typical freshman classes, there will likely not be a lot of math in copywriting and design classes. If you pursue a marketing degree, math will be required in intro-level accounting, finance, stats, and economics classes. Afterward, as you specialize, you may encounter math as part of case studies or coursework. However, the math required is less trigonometry or calculus and more basic math/algebra.

Good luck!
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Dana’s Answer

Hi Maddy - I was a marketing major in college and similarly to you, math was not my favorite subject! While you will likely have a couple of math courses as part of your general education requirements, marketing majors tend to have courses that are specific to business economics. While they include some math, I found courses like Finance, Economics, and Accounting were easier for me to understand because they were applicable concepts to my area of interest.

For the required courses, such as Finance or Accounting, I would just recommend that if you ever are feeling like you are struggling, don't be afraid to ask the professor or other students for help. Professors, in particular, are a great resource and can help you get the support you need to be successful in those courses. I wouldn't let the few math courses deter you from a marketing degree if that's what you are interested in!
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Bridget’s Answer

I have certificate in marketing, for a business degree. courses required were mostly 2 - business, 3- art, 1 - ethics, 2- economics and 2 - marketing 101 and 102- my certificate was specifically for management in marketing for entreprenuerial business. Courses are very similarto most courses being books, self study and course work to acheive a specific out come - 2 of my courses were building a company and completing a advertising campaign. I would caution that you consider what type of marketing you are interested in - Design, verbal (communication like social media) or management to determine the best course of action. Your college counselor should be able to help you determine the best courses for the type of degree you are seeking.
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Anne’s Answer

Hello Maddy!!

I am about to gradate with my Marketing degree at Penn State. There is definitely math within the degree and there is a fair amount of jobs requiring math after you graduate. However, the math is not to terribly complicated and you can choose fields that require little of it. These fields typically fall under communications, advertising or public relations. It is important to remember that most jobs will require you to do some math at the end of the day at some point so its not completely unavoidable.

Math was definitely not my favorite but don't push yourself to a career to avoid something you dislike! I would encourage you to get over your weakest points and not worry to much about the rest. I wish you all the best!

Sincerely,
Anne
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Nida’s Answer

First and foremost, you have the opportunity to explore the course curriculum of any prominent university online, or you could even reach out to an Enrollment Advisor via email. This way, you can find a program and university that perfectly aligns with your needs, as not all of them have identical prerequisites.

Here's a glimpse into the math-related courses I undertook to earn my Bachelor of Business in Marketing Degree:
- Finite Mathematics (focusing on probability)
- Business Calculus
- Accounting 1
- Accounting 2
- Finance
- Business Statistics

It's crucial to remember that most universities provide tutoring services if you find yourself needing extra assistance. I, for one, greatly benefited from these services. By the time I reached graduate school, I was the one tutoring others in Statistics, and now I've built a career in Data.

Don't let these courses intimidate you. Just like countless others before you, you have the ability to succeed. If necessary, don't hesitate to utilize the resources at your disposal for additional support. Wishing you all the best on your journey!
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Jen’s Answer

I agree with others that math classes are not usually required. However, understanding data and analytics can be very helpful to a career in marketing, so if you have an opportunity to take one of those elective classes it should give you an advantage!
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Jennifer’s Answer

In business degrees, including Marketing, there are usually some baseline finance/math courses required. Most schools offer tutoring sessions in addition to professors being available for extra support and help. If you also have friends who are strong in these courses they might be willing to offer you help. Don't let this discourage you from securing a marketing degree.
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Dustin’s Answer

Hi Maddy! Many business majors allow you to specialize in different marketing disciplines, which generally don't require a lot of math classes. I was required to take a statistics call as part of my business major, which was challenging but insightful.
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Dustin’s Answer

I want to go into International Marketing but I do not like or do well in math classes so I was wondering whether or not the major has a lot of math based classes. marketing collegemajor business

Hi Maddy! Many business majors allow you to specialize in different marketing disciplines, which generally don't require a lot of math classes. I was required to take a statistics call as part of my business major, which was challenging but insightful.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Maddy,

Pathway to a Marketing Major in College

If you're aiming for a marketing major, particularly with an emphasis on International Marketing, your academic journey will encompass a diverse range of subjects. These subjects will span across different facets of marketing and business. The curriculum for marketing majors typically includes fundamental business courses, supplemented by specialized marketing classes. These classes are designed to hone your skills in areas such as product development, customer market analysis, and devising promotion strategies.

Mathematical Components in a Marketing Major

As a marketing major, you're not expected to delve deeply into math-based subjects. While the curriculum might include basic math courses like statistics and finance, they are not as intensive or intricate as pure mathematics courses. The math-related components of a marketing major are typically designed to be practical and directly applicable to your field of study, rather than being theoretical or abstract.

Essential Courses for Aspiring Marketing Majors

Marketing Principles: This course offers a comprehensive understanding of the fundamental concepts and strategies in marketing.

Communication: Developing effective communication skills is crucial for marketers to deliver their messages to their target audiences successfully.

Economics: A grasp of economic principles enables marketers to interpret market trends and consumer behavior.

Finance: A basic understanding of finance is vital for making informed budgeting and pricing decisions in marketing.

Management: Acquiring knowledge about management principles can pave the way for future leadership roles in marketing.

Supplementary Electives and Specialized Courses

Beyond the core courses, marketing majors can also choose electives that resonate with their interests or career aspirations. If you're focusing on International Marketing, some specialized courses you might find useful include:

International Marketing: This course delves into the strategies for marketing products on a global scale.

Global Business Environment: This course provides insights into the cultural, political, and economic factors that shape international markets.

Cross-Cultural Communication: This course equips students with the skills to communicate effectively across diverse cultures.

In summary, while a marketing major does include some math-related elements, they are typically manageable and are designed to have practical applications within the marketing field, rather than focusing on advanced mathematical concepts.

Top 3 Credible Sources Used in Compiling this Answer:

College Board
U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
American Marketing Association

May God bless you!
James Constantine Frangos.
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Lalia’s Answer

Hi Maddy. Every school will have slightly different core requirements. My undergraduate degree is in advertising, and I was required to take statistics. Graduate school included finance classes, so it is beneficial to have some math, but you should be able to look into schools that interest you and inquire about curriculums.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hi Maddy,

Marketing is a dynamic field that involves a wide range of activities aimed at promoting and selling products or services. If you're considering an International Marketing major, you'll dive into subjects such as global marketing strategies, cross-cultural communication, international business law, and language proficiency. While having some mathematical abilities can be useful for data analysis and market research, the level of math required varies based on the specific program and institution.

As per the American Marketing Association (AMA), key marketing skills include effective communication, creativity, critical thinking, and problem-solving abilities. Although math courses like statistics and economics can be beneficial, they are not always compulsory for all marketing programs.

If your interest lies in fields like advertising or public relations, you might have fewer math requirements compared to those focusing on data analytics or market research.

Here are some courses you might come across as an International Marketing major with minimal math requirements:

1. Principles of Marketing: This core course delves into the fundamentals of marketing concepts, strategies, and practices. No math is needed.

2. International Business Environment: This course examines the cultural, economic, legal, and political factors that impact international business operations. Basic statistics may be used for market trend analysis, but no advanced math is necessary.

3. Global Marketing Strategies: This course helps students understand how to adapt marketing strategies for different international markets. Some statistical analysis might be involved, but it doesn't require advanced math skills.

4. Cross-Cultural Communication: This course emphasizes the importance of effective communication in international business settings. It helps students understand and navigate cultural differences in communication styles and practices. No math is needed.

5. Language Proficiency: Depending on your chosen language(s), you might need to take language courses to enhance your communication skills with international clients or colleagues. No math is involved.

6. International Business Law: This course explores the legal frameworks that govern international trade and commerce. Some familiarity with basic legal concepts might be helpful, but no advanced math skills are needed.

7. Global Logistics & Supply Chain Management: This course covers the processes involved in transporting, storing, and distributing goods across borders. No advanced math is required.

8. Global Advertising & Promotion: This course teaches students how to create effective advertising campaigns for specific international markets, considering cultural differences. No advanced math is needed.

9. International Sales & Distribution: This course focuses on crafting sales strategies for companies aiming to penetrate foreign markets. No advanced math is required.

10. Global Market Research: In this course, students learn how to collect and analyze data about consumer preferences in different international markets. Basic arithmetic skills are enough for this course.

11. Cultural Anthropology/Sociology: These courses, which focus on understanding different cultures, can help marketers tailor their strategies effectively. No math is involved.

12. Economics (Micro & Macro): These courses offer insights into supply and demand dynamics and economic systems that shape global markets. They involve some math, but alternatives like spreadsheets or calculators are usually provided.

13. Statistics (Introductory): This course introduces fundamental statistical concepts without delving too deeply into complex mathematical theories.

14. Data Analysis Tools (Excel/SPSS): These tools allow users to analyze large datasets visually rather than mathematically.

15. Ethics & Social Responsibility in Business: This course discusses ethical considerations in international business, ensuring companies operate responsibly while respecting local customs. No math is involved.

References Used:

- American Marketing Association (AMA) - www.amainternational.org
- National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) - https://nces.ed.gov
- Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) - www.aacsb.edu/

Stay blessed!
JC.