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Should I continue my Degree?

I'm graduating this month from a community college with my Associates in Business. I am thinking about transferring to a university to get my bachelors in marketing, but I honestly don't know what I want to do with my degree/career. I'm struggling to make a decision on whether or not I should go to school in the fall to get my bachelors. I have been working full time throughout college to pay for my tuition, and don't want to blow all my hard working money to get my degree in something I'm not sure I want to do. Any advice? #college #college-major #career #business #marketing


YES! always finish what you started :) Marie E.

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John’s Answer

Taylor Your College Degree Has More Value Than You Think

We all know about the obvious benefits to having a college degree — namely, a steady job and financial security. But we often overlook other benefits to higher education: quality of life improvements that deserve to be brought into focus, whether you’re on the fence about continuing with collegel or are just having a hard time appreciating the degree you already have.

MAJOR BENEFITS OF A COLLEGE DEGREE

Earning a college degree – at any level – will open doors for you that would otherwise but shut. In addition to the skills and knowledge acquired by earning a degree, attending college provides professional networking opportunities inaccessible to those who don’t go to college. And the career networking opportunities typically increase with every level of education attained (e.g. associates, bachelor, master, and doctoral).

So why do employers place such an emphasis on you earning your degree? Does earning a college degree mean that you’re smarter? Well, that all depends on you – but in most cases, the answer is yes. Even if you don’t remember everything you were taught in college, most students come away with:

1) a greater ability to think analytically and theoretically;
2) a stronger ability to work in teams and groups;
3) the ability to solve a task or problem and the discipline to see it through from beginning to end; and
4) a measured ability to understand aspects of certain subject matter – four very attractive qualities in a potential employee.

For these reasons and many others, employers seek after college graduates when looking to fill job positions. Earning a college degree will greatly enhance your marketability as a professional. Not only does a college degree make you more marketable, it makes you more marketable to a much greater range of career options. While high school graduates can look forward to entry-level positions in non-skilled positions, graduates with a 4-year bachelor’s degree and even those with a 2-year associate degree, will qualify for a much greater range of higher paying entry- and upper-level career positions.

BETTER DEGREE OF BENEFITS

Studies have shown that college graduates are more likely to receive greater employer-provided benefits than employees without a college degree. This is especially true when it comes to healthcare coverage. A 2020 report produced by College Board showed that roughly 70 percent of individuals with a four-year college degree received health insurance from their employer, while less than 50 percent of employees with only a associate degree received the same benefit. Across the board, college graduates are able to find jobs with better benefits. In addition to health care insurance, college graduates can look forward to better retirement matching, health savings accounts, tuition reimbursement, free childcare and reimbursement for travel and commuting costs. In some instances, a benefits package can be worth almost as much as an employee’s take-home pay.

Not surprisingly, college graduates are typically more satisfied with their careers than individuals with a high school diploma – and since we spend almost our entire lives working, job satisfaction can be a large factor in our overall satisfaction with life and sense of well-being. Studies have also shown that as the level of education increase, so does job satisfaction. College graduates are typically more satisfied with their careers for a number of reasons. They’re able to find higher paying careers. They’re able to get into positions with job advancement opportunities. They’re able to get hired by employers that provide generous benefits. And most importantly, they’re able to work in fields and industries that interest them.

Finally, one of the greatest benefits to having a college education is passing on the legacy to your children. Children of a college grad are more likely to have a better quality of life and pursue extended education themselves. Those children also have a much easier time getting into good schools because their parents have emphasized the importance of an education to them. They also tend to have better grades and test scores.

Was this Helpful Taylor

Thank You Parag. “If you become a helper of hearts, springs of wisdom will flow from your heart.” – Rumi John Frick

Thank You as Always Dexter. “Even if it’s a little thing, do something for those who have need of a man’s help– something for which you get no pay but the privilege of doing it. For, remember, you don’t live in a world all your own. Your brothers are here, too.” – Albert Schweitzer John Frick

Thank You Andrea. “Wherever there is a human being, there is an opportunity for a kindness.” – Seneca John Frick

Thank You Stephen. “We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.” — Winston Churchill John Frick

Thank You Zeenat. “The broadest, and maybe the most meaningful definition of volunteering: Doing more than you have to because you want to, in a cause you consider good. ” – Ivan Scheier John Frick

Thank You Marie. “The purpose of life is not to be happy, but to matter– to be productive, to be useful, to have it make some difference that you have lived at all.” – Leo Rosten John Frick

Your Welcome Taylor. Every great dream begins with a dreamer, always remember you have within you passion realize that dream. John Frick

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Shawnee’s Answer

You should definitely look to transfer and complete your bachelor's degree, however do not feel rushed to do so if a financial burden would ensue. One way or the other a bachelor's degree is going to be an asset. Many professionals do not land in the field of study for which they obtained a degree however, many of us found that a undergraduate degree of any kind was required. You do have the opportunity to change your major if something of more interest to you presents itself during your studies and there is no harm in that. Do take some time to evaluate what it is that you would like to do long term.

Shawnee - I like your quick and clear response. You also listened to her concern about the cost and still weighed that against the benefits in the long term. I, like many, have a job that has nothing to do with my college degree. Vicki Lyons

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KATIE’s Answer

To me this all depends on you! Having a degree can really be a great way to get your foot in the door for interviews for career-type jobs. That said, this economy is tough. I have found that it doesn't quite matter so much which college you attend as it matters having a degree. This is a generalization, but if you are a go-getter, the actual college may not matter as much. So maybe you can save money / time by going somewhere closer to home or a smaller school, etc. I will share that part of what is the magic of going away to college is you grow as a person and are responsible in ways that are different from being at home. College is where people tend to find themselves and explore areas that will influence their lives. I think the answer is you need to look within yourself and determine what is the right path for you. I work with some fantastic colleagues who don't have degrees! I will say they are few and far between though at bigger companies or only in certain roles. That's why i ask about how much of a go-getter are you. You can make things happen; sometimes it's just hard to get your foot in the door. I wish I could give you a set answer, but this is one you need to decide for yourself. Keep in mind, you can always change your mind later!

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Curt’s Answer

My first answer is: Don't quit. Too often people walk away from finishing their degrees and never go back. Sometimes that works out and they go on to have rewarding careers and have no regrets. However, more times I've heard how they wish they had never quit and just kept going. My second answer is: Really think through what you enjoy doing - not just professionally but personally. Take the time to invest in figuring out what you THINK you see yourself doing and being happy doing with your career. Consult other people that you trust and who know you to offer input. Do research on careers - pros/cons, compensation, demand, etc. In the end my first answer is still the one I would strongly encourage you to consider - not quitting. A degree is very valuable and while it may not ultimately be in the field you find yourself in, more times than not that's how it works out, it does get you through the doors to find the thing that will make you the happiest. If you don't have a degree and need it - door is shut. If you have a degree and don't need it - door is still open.

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Maharlika’s Answer

I changed majors three times during my undergraduate years, since I felt there were so many interesting options to choose from. I would recommend researching majors that truly interest you and possibly reaching out to undergraduate advisors for further advice. I met several advisors when I encountered uncertainty with which major to choose, and their feedback helped me finally narrow my major options.
Also, another site that I found to be highly informative was the US Bureau of Labor Statistics' "Occupational Outlook Handbook". This helped me learn the level of projected demand for the major area I was interested in, and what duties/positions were associated with the area I was wanting to learn more about.

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Dexter’s Answer

Hi Taylor,

One thing I would like to ask is, is this a feeling that you had recently, or have you been unsure about your degree for a while now?

I ask because I feel that the feeling of uncertainty that we all have, and the fact that we're finding out that no one seems to know what will happen in the future (versus a few months ago, when we all knew exactly what was going to happen in the summer, e.g. baseball was starting in April, etc). Given this uncertainty, I think a lot of people are feeling unsure about our future path forward. If this is a new feeling you've had, I would recommend that you press on with your education. As John stated in his response, a college education is worth it for a multitude of reasons. And if this is a degree that you were sure about before the COVID crisis, when we come out of it, perhaps you'll find the joy for it again. For me, this stressful time has made me rethink some core beliefs that I've had, and I think that's ok. An unlikely event should make us rethinking things. But I also think that while our brain tries to adjust to this new world, it doesn't mean that you or I are different people than who we were before this crisis. We'll adjust/change during this crisis, but I'm not sure if we'll change enough for you to need to rethink a whole new career for yourself.

However, if this is a feeling that you've had for a while, well I would advise that you spend some time figuring out who you are before committing to a career. The way I think about college is that it's as if you're in a slingshot and the more you learn and commit to a degree, the more you are pulling the sling shot back so that when you graduate, you're being shot into your career. In this analogy, earning a degree is being pulled back, so you have all that potential energy stored up and the career you dream about having is the target that we're aiming at. Now, it's possible to choose the wrong target, but still get a bullseye, but it's unlikely. Like so, it's possible for you to get a degree in something that you don't love, but end up in a job that makes your soul sing; possible, but unlikely. Right now, what you may be feeling is that you're aiming at the wrong target. I think it's prudent to take a breather, really find out what you want to do, and aim at a different target, if that makes more sense to you. There's no need to press on if your gut tells you that you're making the wrong decision for your future self.

I hope this was helpful Taylor, and I wish you the best of luck.

--
Dexter

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Enma Ninoska’s Answer

Hi Taylor,

You must be going through a lot during this time, with everything going on and trying to make this decision is also probably not making things any less stressful. I think the first thing you need to ask yourself is do you want to do Marketing, what about Marketing interests you? What type of Marketing do you think you want to get into? If you can answer some of those, I think the next best thing is to reach out to people who work in this industry, such as looking up a company in LinkedIn, then narrowing that search to people who work in entry level positions and then to people who work further up that ladder. Simply send them a message, state your dilemma and ask what they regularly do day to day, or what they usually get tasked with quarterly or accomplish yearly even. Reaching out to faculty for certain Universities that you're interested in who've worked in the field would also be a good idea. After all of that, asking what it usually requires to enter those companies you've searched that you're interested in their work, from someone who works in HR would be a good step to see how much education you really need, and how much more you would need in skill sets experience instead.

Don't forget that college is an investment, an expensive one, but sometimes some jobs require much less education than you think so it's be good to look into the actual hiring requirements for the work that interests you.

Also if at the end of the day you figure out you don't like Marketing and want to do something else, well at least you caught on early about your interests and can get started on something else that may suit you more. Only if that's what it comes down to.

Best wishes in your search.

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Christopher’s Answer

Hello! I would absolutely pursue a full Bachelors degree. You could attend a standard 4-year university or if you are trying to save money, there are many online universities that offer 4-year degrees. I personally understand not knowing what you want to do, I changed my major 4 times in college. With an associates in business, pursuing a business degree makes a lot of sense. If you focused on an area, sounds like it was marketing, you will still have many options in business school, they typically offer marketing, management, and finance concentrations. Management is a good catch-all that will allow you to pursue multiple jobs once you complete school, that is what I did. If you enjoy marketing, you could always pursue that and take management classes as a minor. Your advisor will work with you on your class choices based on your feedback.

I also think its a good idea to get a full 4-year degree because it will differentiate you from other applicants when applying for a job. You will also have the opportunity to join various clubs and organizations that will introduce you to a variety of people, which can be helpful during school, but also when looking for a job after school.


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Katya’s Answer

Hi Taylor, I have a question for you- you mentioned that you have been working full time to support your education. In which field have you been working and what skills have you practiced on the job?

I definitely recommend to continue with your education-because right at this very moment it might seem like it’s more then enough but as you will be getting work experience- most companies do look for the `bachelor degree and `master degree. So, I don’t recommend you stop -because it’s very difficult to go back to college once you are out of the routine. continue to look for bachelor degree-some could be online, expand the skills level research, conduct some online testing about your personality and what you enjoy doing. Ask yourself, this questions :`’what would I enjoy doing 24/7 and ?`’ try to match that passion to your future career.

What are your interests ? Do you enjoy video games- perhaps you could look into the product development degree . Do you enjoy communicating with clients, solve problems- do you like math , law? What experience did you have in the past?
Which classes did you enjoy taking for your associate degree?

All these questions are relevant to you and once you start writing down your strength you will be able to see what motivates you .

After you complete your Bachelor Degree- you can continue your education by taking specific career certificates

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ELIZABETH’s Answer

First of all, I think you made a smart decision by getting your Associate's first. Financially that was a smarter move than going for the 4-year degree and stopping halfway through with nothing to show. To answer your question, a degree is the best idea if you can earn it and get a good job without accumulating a large debt in the process. Perhaps you can take some time off from school to decide what you want to do, but be careful not to take too much time making a decision.

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Carmen’s Answer

If you haven't already, before you make that decision see if there is an opportunity to shadow someone in marketing. Possibly look into an internship and then make your decision after that.

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Blake’s Answer

Hey Taylor,

I think that this is a great question. I have two opinions on the matter. First, I've heard multiple friends and family tell me throughout my life that when they took a break from college, regardless of the reason, they had a very hard time going back. Now, that doesn't mean that it will be the same for you, but just what I've observed. Second, I would say that if you've already attended community college you should have some idea of what types of majors colleges have to offer. Most people don't know exactly what they want to do when they go to college, but that's okay. I would go for something generic like a business degree, and then see if something jumps out at you while going there in school. Internships are a great way to decide what you might be interested in for your career.

Thanks,
Blake

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Megan’s Answer

I suggest going for it if you are able (even if you are not sure that a career in marketing is what you want to peruse). One of the benefits of perusing a degree is the hidden benefits of expanding your network, developing problem solving skills and analytical thinking skills, and learning more about potential career paths. Many times I have found that people graduate with a degree and go on to peruse
careers outside of their area of study. However, they are able to utilize the soft skills that they developed in their degree programs and apply them to different work situations.

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Brenda’s Answer

I would apply to wherever you would like to attend college and then once you start I would visit with a counselor. They can point you in the right direction as to what to do. You may change your mind once you start but I think you have a good plan in place.

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Chris’s Answer

yes

Hi Chris, can you elaborate on your response? Why should the student continue? Gurpreet Lally

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Arquilia’s Answer

You should try to transfer and complete your bachelor's degree. My son has started this journey and was even able to find scholarships to help ease financials. You can take as much time as you need, do not feel like you have to rush this process. With COVID a lot of schools are being very flexible with transfer students.

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Will’s Answer

The short answer is yes. If you can afford it even with some sacrifices it's going to be worth it in the long run. You can probably find a decent job in entry level business with just an associates and do fine without it up to a point but unless your in sales you will eventually be competing with people for promotion that have their degree or a masters and that could be the difference maker. Before you decide you should look, if you're getting lots of interviews and can find a company that will pay for your continued education you likely won't feel the difference of not having it for several years.

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Kresa’s Answer

It can be challenging working fulltime and going to school.

You are 1/2 way there and have worked hard to obtain your associates degree. The next two years will help align you with potential career paths and might highlight other areas of business you may not have been aware of, like accounting, finance, business management, information technology.

Having your bachelors will open doors and distinguish you between other job applicants, whether you decide to stay in this field or not.

You will feel a sense of accomplishments and your hard work and sacrifice will not have been for nothing.

Hang in there and go get that degree.

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Virginia’s Answer

I, too, felt that way when I was finished with the core classes in my undergrad. Initially, I wanted to double major in Communications and Business Marketing. At the end, I decided not to go through with completing the Business Marketing side since I wasn't sure what I'd even do with the degree. In the end, I was more regretful that I never completed it when I had the chance to. One thing you have to keep reminding yourself is that it's okay for you to not know what you want to do when you're out of college. But don't let that uncertainty refrain you from getting all the experience that you can while in college. If getting the degree is making you unhappy, then I'd truly understand; otherwise, keep chugging along!

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Lisa’s Answer

I remember feeling that same way. The upside is that there is no wrong or right answer, I'd say most importantly don't give up! But remember if you take a break that it's never too late to jump back in, there is no time limit. Maybe you'd like to work part time and take a few classes, see how that feels. Do what feels right for you at this moment. Whatever you decide, I hope you find something that makes you happy in the end.

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Deborah’s Answer

I believe you will be well served if you continue your education, go for your bachelors and then why not get a masters. When trying to decide on a major, I like the comments of some that went before me, do some research and see if you can shadow someone to see if that really interests you.

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Jim’s Answer

Hi, Taylor. When I was not in college I had a lengthy conversation with a successful man who said he would not hire anyone without a college degree—not because any course material would be that important or valuable, but that degree makes a person feel better about themselves because they took on a big task and completed it. (He swore he had an excellent employee with a degree in surfing from the University of Hawaii.) Ultimately, I dropped back into college (not Surfing or University of Hawaii) and completed my degree in hopes that man would hire me. He didn’t, but he did find me my first job, and I still endorse his guidance from long ago. Best wishes.

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Kresa’s Answer

It can be challenging working fulltime and going to school. You are 1/2 way there and have worked hard to obtain your associates degree. The next two years will help align you with potential career paths and might highlight other areas of business you may not have been aware of, like accounting, finance, business management, information technology. Having your bachelors will open doors and distinguish you between other job applicants, whether you decide to stay in this field or not. You will feel a sense of accomplishments and your hard work and sacrifice will not have been for nothing. Hang in there and go get that degree.

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Steve’s Answer

I would say yes and consider the University of Pittsburgh if that works for you. Transfer as many credits as the 4-year college will allow, then map out your degree plan with that college counselor to determine how may hours and courses are required to complete the Marketing or Management degree assuming you are staying with business. As we never really know what we want to do when we grow up, you'll just need to try different jobs when you graduate, to see what type of business you like. You could be in Corporate, or Retail, or Fashion, or C-Store Management or Restaurants. Or you could swing generally towards Finance, Procurement (this is what I do), Real Estate (also for me), Marketing, Management or Operations. Test different firm types allowing two years on each job (if possible) so that you give it enough time to properly decide what you enjoy the most, while not running your career by being a job-hopper.


Happy hunting....

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Ben’s Answer

This is a great question and one that is not easy to answer. Investing in your education is likely to be beneficial over the long term, if done prudently. Many state colleges have admissions programs that support starting your undergraduate education at a community college and then transferring those credits to the college. I would definitely recommend exploring those options. Additionally, many colleges are adapting their curriculum to better support part time and on line learning. Those options make undergraduate education more accessible for many people. Another option to explore is a certificate program in your area of interest. Certificate programs are generally shorter, less expensive and would allow you to explore topics a little deeper and build your resume for the future. I also think it is important to remember that getting a degree in a specific area does not lock you in - you can and should continue to explore your interests and opportunities throughout your entire career!

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Gabriela’s Answer

Hi Taylor,

First of all, kudos to you for being thoughtful and practical about your education and for analyzing what your next steps would be and how the Marketing degree would best help you accomplish your goals and career vision. Working full-time while in college to pay for tuition is not easy at all, and proves your ability to work hard to pursue your dreams.

If you are debating whether a Marketing degree best fits your skills and interests, I would recommend trying to get a summer internship that involves Marketing work. You could also refer to your academic advisor in finding what companies in the area usually recruit Marketing majors and for what kind of work. The Marketing major is usually offered as part of the College of Business; and if you see yourself having a career in Business (but potentially find out that you would be rather interested in a different Business major such as Management Information Systems or Finance later on), you can also apply for a major switch within the College of Business as all your Business pre-requisites are met. Alternatively, if that happens, you could even keep Marketing as your minor as some colleges offer it as a minor.

I would strongly encourage to finish your education and receive a Bachelor's degree, as holding it both significantly widens your skills & knowledge and opens a large door of employment opportunities.

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Georgia’s Answer

There is always a benefit to obtaining a college degree. Employers will look heavily on understanding what you have accomplished during your college years. Also, attending college will open doors for you with internships and making connections. If financially it is a strain, you could consider working part time while obtaining your bachelors degree. Also, if you determine one day that you want to go to graduate school, you will be in a better position to do so with a bachelor's combined with work experience. Good luck to you.

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ELIZABETH’s Answer

First of all, I think you made a smart decision by getting your Associate's first. Financially that was a smarter move than going for the 4-year degree and stopping halfway through with nothing to show. To answer your question, a degree is the best idea if you can earn it and get a good job without accumulating a large debt in the process. Perhaps you can take some time off from school to decide what you want to do, but be careful not to take too much time making a decision.

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Stanley’s Answer

I would transfer and try to find internships or a job in something that interests you. It could guide you into a decision about what degree to pursue.

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qiuhua’s Answer

I recommend transfer and complete your bachelor degree. I saw a research before and the results shows that degree and salary are related. Bachelor degree is linked to a higher pay. Also, bachelor degree is required for some of position. And you cannot apply for these positions with a associate degree. In the long run, bachelor degree definitely worth it.

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Sylvia’s Answer

I personally had the same dilemma after community college because I wasn't sure I wanted to continue to work full time and put myself through school. (I was working as a teller for the same bank I work for now as a divisional analyst 13 years later). I started as a part time teller and worked my way through branch positions until I decided to take a leap and become an analyst internally. I love what I do now and I've been doing it for 5 years.

Ultimately, I did decide to continue my degree after community college because regardless of the financial challenges I felt it would benefit me to the fullest in any career I went into. It may have taken me longer than most to complete, I am proud that I have a BA in Business Management from the University of Massachusetts - Isenberg School of Management . I was able to take online classes (all year round - only 2 classes a semester including summer) which helped me work full time and still be able to do well and focus on my college classes. I was able to get some financial aid, but I primarily had federal loans and paid for as much as I could while continuing to live on my own. I would recommend getting into a job/industry in which you could see yourself continuing to work in that would align with your college degree in some respects. Also, sometimes companies offer to assist a financial portion of your tuition if your courses are related to the industry. Being in the banking industry while taking college courses I found I was gaining experience and learning hands on in a sense because a lot of the material could be directly related. I felt that I gained more in general from doing it this way than I would've if I went to a 4 year college or stopped at Community College. Also if you do decide to go the online route consider taking classes together that compliment each other to make the semesters a little easier. Taking the required classes first and then having my last semester be all electives really worked for me. I do think they've come a long way since my online college experience, but keep in mind you can take one online and one in person class. Whatever works for you is the important part throughout all of this.

Side note - I was torn between marketing and management and I went with management because I found that I could still take a marketing class, but my thought process was that I would use more of a management degree vs marketing. Again - it's really what interests you more/what you feel would benefit your career goals.

Whatever you decide - good luck and please don't give up!

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Chris’s Answer

Excellent question. I would strongly advise to continue your education. You are investing in yourself and future. However the crossroad that exists is that do you want to continue down the business path. If so, them continue on the path you are on. You mention that you are working full time, and so I would look into the possibility of tuition reimbursement programs offer at your current employer. This will let you know just how much your current employer is willing to invest in your future. That said, if you are unsure about your major and are looking to switch things up, this is the time to take the time you need to make that decision. Good luck!

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Erika’s Answer

Do not stop; you can do this. Business degree has lots of options to jump to different department to see which one you really like. I had no idea what I wanted to do either. I got my associates at a community college and had a full time job working at a staffing agent that put me in different positions while studying. This helped me decide what I really liked to do and you might be surprised of what you end up doing. A 4-year degree will help you get a good job and I am sure you will find something you love. Try financing, taxes, real estate, accounting, HR, project manager, medical billing, audits, sales etc.

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Peter’s Answer

Hi Taylor - think of your Associates degree as a strong foundation to equip you with the skills you need to continue working while pursuing your Marketing degree is adding a specialization or focus in your career. Personally, I would pursue the Marketing degree as it will give you a very good understanding on consumer behavior, consumer sentiment, consumer personas, psychology, etc. and perhaps the best media (online, print, broadcast, etc.) to use to carry your message to your target audience. Marketing tools and techniques will evolve over time but these are still rooted in consumer theory. Hope this helps. Good luck! -Peter

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Adrian’s Answer

Hi Taylor!

By now you know how expensive it is to pursue a degree. I think you should take your time and think about what your next steps should be. As mentioned above maybe shadow someone in that field you are thinking of, or a big one is TRY SOME NEW THINGS. Often times we don't know where our passion and talents lie until we have a moment to explore. We charge forward and 30 years later realize we are in the wrong field. So this is the perfect time to see where your passion , interest, and talent all connect! There is no rush to spend a lot of money on a piece of paper that you may or may not use.

have a great day!

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Robert’s Answer

Don't feel that your degree concentration limits your career. Many people work in fields that they didn't study in. The degree itself tells employers that your are dedicated to a goal. That means a lot. Continue your degree, but always keep your mind open.

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Jenna’s Answer

Make an appointment to see a counselor. They can give you an assessment to see where your strengths and weaknesses are. Think about where your passion lies. What type of work makes you happiest? Once you narrow down the areas you think you may interested go talk to the professors who teach in these fields to get a clearer picture of what your day to day would look like. When you choose your career path then you can determine if it will require more schooling.

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Colleen’s Answer

It's definitely worth it in the end, you learn so much more than just career specific information. No matter what subject you end up earning your degree, even if it's an area you eventually don't pursue as a career path, it is still helpful in your career growth.

I would look into financial assistance as it is very expensive, but you may be able to get a lot of it covered through assistance programs.

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Rebecca’s Answer

One question you might ask yourself is, is there opportunity in your current position for growth and development and is that something you see your self doing long term? If not, perhaps moving forward with a Bachelors would help you explore other areas of interest. Also, start looking into internships that might give you an opportunity to get real life experience.

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Emesha’s Answer

Hi Taylor, this is a great question. A million times yes, transferring to a university to obtain a degree in marketing will give you flexibility during your job search and potential for a higher salary. A degree in marketing and business will open many doors you could go into sales, product management or even advertising. Before you make your decision consider the following questions- financially can you afford to transfer to a university, are there opportunities to receive scholarships and grants, will you transfer to a university in your state or out of state, do you have a passion for creativity and working with people? Best of luck to you, check out the articles below for more information.

https://work.chron.com/advantages-majoring-marketing-6191.html

https://www.aiuniv.edu/degrees/business/articles/is-marketing-a-good-major

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/287821

https://www.wayup.com/guide/marketing-major-right/

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Karla’s Answer

Hi Taylor-

I can totally relate! I was in your shoes, many, many (MANY) years ago. I attended my local community college (while working FT) and was hesitant and unclear of my next move (particularly since I was putting myself through college). Marketing was one of my three career choices (accounting and international business being the other two); but ultimately, I decide on a BS in Management (I continued with my BS right after my assoc degree and was able to get a partial scholarship too- they are out there!). I figured that a BS in Bus. Mgmt. would be a good start since I could potentially transfer units to another degree should I change my mind (which I didn’t).

Because of the financial and time commitment, deciding became very over whelming…but Taylor- it was the best investment I’ve made! The most valuable thing (besides the knowledge in your field, net-working, and the actual degree, etc.) is who you become after the whole experience. I loved the experience during my two-years at my community college, that experience was amazing; but what you’ll be exposed to while you obtain your BA/BS is quite different than what you experience in a community college. The exposure will continue to broaden your perspective for both your personal and work situations. You just become more well-rounded, you will enhance personal abilities and skills and learn of new ones you may not even know you have. Not that you are not confident now Taylor (I was not shy or lacked confidence then- or now) but you will strengthen your confidence level which makes you better equipped for work (and personal) environment. Lastly, keep in mind that an investment in yourself stays will YOU no matter where life takes you!

I wish you all the best- Good luck!

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Steve’s Answer

I would say yes and consider the University of Pittsburgh if that works for you. Transfer as many credits as the 4-year college will allow, then map out your degree plan with that college counselor to determine how may hours and courses are required to complete the Marketing or Management degree assuming you are staying with business. As we never really know what we want to do when we grow up, you'll just need to try different jobs when you graduate, to see what type of business you like. You could be in Corporate, or Retail, or Fashion, or C-Store Management or Restaurants. Or you could swing generally towards Finance, Procurement (this is what I do), Real Estate (also for me), Marketing, Management or Operations. Test different firm types allowing two years on each job (if possible) so that you give it enough time to properly decide what you enjoy the most, while not running your career by being a job-hopper.


Happy hunting....

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Doug’s Answer

This is a great question and I would say that you are the only one that can ultimately answer. However, I will share that I made a choice years and years ago to not to continue my education and although I have been very blessed in my life there have been a number of times I wished I had continued with my education. An education is something that can never be taken away and there are so many business that put a high value on have a 4 year or even sometimes more degree(s). I can also tell you that there are a lot of people that come out of college with a degree and end up finding work in areas that are not directly related to the field of your degree. Most companies seem to be more interested in the fact that you spent the time and disciple to complete the degree vs. the area of study. I believe education and educators help you get ready for the work environment in so many more ways than just what you are studying. I can tell you that I have worked for many companies and managers that have their own unique ways of working and you have to be willing to adapt just like to professors and what they expect/demand. If you are willing to adapt and work hard you will usually reap the benefits in the end.

Good luck in whatever you decide to pursue. AND what you do decide simply give it your all!!!

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