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How long did it take you to get to where you are? And What classes did you take?

i'm at student trying to get my degree in COMPUTER & INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGERS #programming #information-technology

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Marvin’s Answer

Hello Jamari! I studied Computer Science from 2000-2005. It took 5 years to get through all of my courses for my bachelor's degree. Some of the classes that you need to take in order to get a degree like this are math and logic courses and programming courses (most of which are likely java/javascript and such nowadays).

After the 5 years it took for my degree, I have been working in technology for over 16 years now and doing great! Keep in mind that technology changes very quickly and you will always have to keep up with new trends, methods, and programming languages but it is very challenging and rewarding!
Thank you comment icon Thanks for the response. Really helped figure out everything better. Jamari
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Andrew’s Answer

It took me 6 years to get my bachelor's degree, which included co-op semesters. I started out as a backend developer, which I did for a couple of years, before transitioning to be a full-stack Web developer for 3 years and then, a mobile developer (Blackberry, Android, iOS). I'm now coming up to my second year as a software development manager. If you include my co-op experience, then I've been in the industry for 22 years.

How you progress is entirely up to you, though. Don't feel as if you need to measure up against others. In general, it's possible to advance faster at a smaller company than a larger one, but your mileage may differ. A positive attitude and perseverance will go a long way regardless.
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Alex’s Answer

I graduated from a 4 year college many years ago, but most of what I learned in the field of computer science was from experience in consulting, running my own business, and hobbies. These days you may get more practical skills from university. I would say that it takes 5-10 years minimum to become proficient in software development. Those years must be spent with knowledgeable, experienced peers.
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Johann’s Answer

Hello,
I got my degree in Computer Science. This helped get my first job in Information Technology. I increased my IT skillset through on the job experience. Some classes that may help are SQL, Python, HTML, JAVA.

After working for a while, I wanted to get more involved in information security. I got a CISSP certification, which opened up opportunities in this space.

Hope this helps.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for answering my question and it really helped me out. Jamari
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Angelo’s Answer

Hi Jamari!
I'm currently finishing up a 5-year Software Engineering bachelor's degree. One really valuable part of my program is that it connects us to internships, which are super important in this field (there's a common joke that an interviewer wants 2 years of experience for an entry-level job; it's an exaggeration but recruiters know the value of real world experience). So if you can get into a program that helps you get that real world experience, I would recommend it!

In terms of courses, I've taken anything that caught my interest - I recommend courses like: Data Structures, Algorithms, Concurrent Programming, Artificial Intelligence. Requirements & Specifications is a very important course too (too many things are being made nowadays without being thoroughly planned, which leads to way more cost).
Thank you comment icon Thank you i'm glad you reached out and answered my question. Jamari
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Vinodh’s Answer

Hi Jamari,
I did a masters in computers, the course included subjects like OOPs, Data structures, advanced mathematics & statistics, a few programming languages[java,c/c++,cobol,VB], basics of software engineering [life cycle models] . I have been working for 17 years across multiple technologies and tools which were not covered in my classes. Get your basics right you should be able to adapt to any new technology or tool.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for answering my question .Thanks for putting in the time for answering my question. Jamari
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