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What steps do I need to take to become a CRNA

#nursing #career #medicine
Good evening, I am a Junior in High School and since june of last year I have wanted to pursue a career in CRNA. The thing is, I have no the slightest clue on how to actually become one, what schooling I need, and what can I start doing now. I know I have to go to nursing school but I am not to sure how because i've seen many different ways to do it on youtube and google and i'm just kinda lost, I don't want to mess this up because i'm going to be the first male in my family to go to college and actually get a career. Also is my act really that important in becoming a crna? Any advice is greatly appreciated- thanks.

Thank you comment icon Congrats on being the first male in the family to attend college. That's a HUGE accomplishment Gurpreet Lally, Admin

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Subject: Career question for you

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Doc’s Answer

Justin to become a nurse anesthetist, you'll need to complete a lengthy education process, beginning with an Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) to become a Registered Nurse (RN). Or alternatively, you can earn your Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) to become a RN without first becoming a ADN. Whichever path you choose, these programs will provide in-depth instruction into the field of nursing, nursing management, and nursing education. Once your BSN is complete you'll need to get a master's degree with a nursing anesthesiology focus or alternatively, complete a master's degree in nursing and then take a post-master's certificate program in anesthesia. Many colleges and universities offer both the RN-to-BSN bridge degree, which are accelerated BSN degrees for those who do not have a nursing license yet, and CRNA master's degrees.

It isn't until a Master of Science in Nursing (with an anesthetist focus) that you will really focus on the anesthetist aspect. To become a nurse anesthetist, or Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA), you'll need to complete all schooling, become certified, and spend roughly one year in an acute care setting (short-term patient care for a variety of circumstances). Because of these requirements it may take around six years to become a CRNA. The prerequisites and requirements for graduate school with a CRNA program vary with every school. For instance, some schools may require a year of acute care nursing prior to submitting your application, or they may require a minimum GPA from your BSN program. In general, you will need at least a bachelor's degree. This could be a BSN, or a non-nursing bachelor's as long as you have an ADN. Many colleges and universities expect you to be an RN, with clinical experience of some kind. Along with your transcripts, application fee, and application.

The course of study is rigorous and demanding and once you’ve become a CRNA you will find yourself immersed in complex cases that can take unexpected turns and require critical thinking. Being a CRNA requires a high degree of responsibility and preparedness: there’s never a dull moment in this job. But if you are looking for a highly compensated, highly respected field that allows you to combine a compassionate and caring bedside manner with technical proficiency, leadership and independent thinking, then becoming a CRNA may be the right choice for you Justin.

Hope this is helpful
Thank you comment icon I appreciate this, thank you for the advice. Justin
Thank you comment icon Just a quick add on.... most of the CRNAs I know had to complete at least two years of work as an RN in an ICU before being accepted into the CRNA program, which is very competitive. Marissa VanWey Young
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Shannon’s Answer

not sure what you mean by 'my act'.
in high school, take every chem & bio & anatomy class you can. if you can take AP level, all the better. this is stuff you'll use every day so you really want to do well in those courses. seriously - some doctors like to torture med students by asking them to present the kreb cycle & junk like that just for fun, in front of their colleagues.
leave some free time to take electives outside of science in high school and undergrad. colleges like people who are well-rounded. another thing you can do now is to learn how to retain information. you'll be needing that skill a. lot. investigate diverse study skills that help you to retain information in the long term.
see if you can volunteer or intern in a hospital during the summers. if you show that you're willing to be the scut monkey (take this to the lab, clean this up, go talk to the difficult patient) and are interested in learning (Dr I was reading this article in a journal and I didn't understand ___) then people will be willing to teach you. always remember that you're in charge of your own education. watch the first few episodes of "ER" for a pretty good picture of what this is all like in the beginning of clinical rotations.
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Fred’s Answer

Searching online is a good start, but you should learn to filter out sources. Or better, search for good ones. A random video on YouTube may not be the best source of information, but a site like the American Association of Nurse Anesthesiology (https://www.aana.com/) would probably be more authoritative. They even have a page that specifically answers your question: https://www.aana.com/membership/become-a-crna/minimum-education-and-experience-requirements

And if your question aren't answered on that page, they have a chatbot that could help guide you further.
Thank you comment icon Thanks for the advice. Justin
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