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I don't what job I'm good at I wanna be a nurse but I'm scared I will fail

I'm 18 and out of school and looking for a good and a permanent job that I will enjoy I love helping people I really want to be a nurse but I'm scared I won't pass the test in college or I would to work in an office in all I really don't know what I'm good at #nursing

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Subject: Career question for you

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12 answers


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M’s Answer

I know you're scared of failure, but you really don't know unless you try. In your case, I would recommend volunteering at different places to gain a sense of what you like or dislike about being a nurse. If you can't get volunteer experience, see if you can shadow a doctor or nurse for observational hours or even try reaching out and talking to people you know within this career field.
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Chris’s Answer

Hi Ester - thanks for sharing your ambitions and concerns!

Growing up, I had a rough home life, at times, which reflected on how I felt about myself and how I performed in school, not to mention my learning disabilities. For many years, I viewed myself as a failure and doubted my capabilities. I was actually even kicked out of my school and sent to a school for kids who fell behind called Futures Unlimited; this didn't help my confidence at all but I finished.

After high school, I joined the military with little direction, but I knew that I needed to leave home to straighten up my situation. I won't go into detail, but some experiences in that time built my confidence, made me realize the value of life, and helped show me the value of education; I mentioned those three areas of improvement because it was where I was lacking and holding myself back. Improving myself led me to start planning how to improve my education. I started by learning through self-help books and eventually started taking night classes while still serving. In the end, I graduated from college, entered the career of my dreams, and am now getting a Masters from a top University. I'm not telling you to brag, rather that I know that you can succeed at what you put your mind to.

Please see my next steps that I recommend for you below. You got this Estelle!

Chris recommends the following next steps:

Create a plan to achieve your goals (Nurse or otherwise)
Be honest with yourself about whether you are willing to do what is necessary to achieve your goals (such as my attending night classes while working)
Find hobbies that may help you boost your confidence in other ways (working out was my starting point =) )
Ask current nurses what advice they have for you and voice your concerns with them
Get tutors, if needed, to strengthen where you feel you want to improve; alternatively, you can search online.
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much for your help I too have a similar story my situation at home is very bad with my parents and family and won't say more but thank you again so much Ester
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Suzanne’s Answer

Hi Ester,
I am a retired RN and appreciate the honesty of your question. I think most people are terrified of failing. I know I was when I was in nursing school.

What helps in overcoming the fear, at least for me, were small successes; one at a time. I started by taking the required courses for an associate's degree in my local community college. I had to work part time, so it was good for me to take just one or two courses a semester. With hard work, focus, and a lot of positive self-talk, I was able to make good grades. I then stepped up the difficulty to the courses required as prerequisites for nursing school: chemistry, biology, anatomy, microbiology etc. One or two a semester and of course one in summer school. I just kept chipping away at the units and focusing on getting good grades. If I didn't understand a topic, I sought out classmates that could help and studied with them.

I applied for and was accepted into nursing school at this same community college. I had to stop working, but by then I had help from my mom. I studied even harder which didn't seem like a sacrifice. I felt like I was going to improve my life and enter a career where I could not only help people, but earn a decent salary. A win-win for me.

Thirty-five years later; I will never, ever regret the hard work, some sacrifice, and ongoing education that I put into my nursing career. It was the best personal decision I ever made. I helped thousands of people (literally). I made friends. I learned more than I ever thought possible. When I retired, I was earning over 100K a year working in a specialty field.

Ester, I never considered myself to be smart or special. I also thought I might fail. But I can attest that hard work, initiative, desire, and drive are some of the key ingredients to success. My biggest regret? My thinking earlier in life that I wasn't very smart. Those thoughts are a waste of time and degrades our inner peace.

You are smarter and more capable than you realize right now. Just get started. Put one foot in front of another.

Here is a list of the community college nursing programs in New York. Call the closest college. Or read through their website. Get started!!!

http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/nurse/nurseprogs-assoc.htm#

I am wishing the very best for you,
Sue
Thank you comment icon OMG thank you so much for your help your so sweet I will definitely give it my best thank you so much you made me believe the n my self more then ever thank you again Ester
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Emily’s Answer

Hi! After reading your question, it reminded me of myself when I was your age. The feeling of something sounding super interesting but not knowing if I will be able to do it or fail trying.

The first thing you need to remember is that sometimes it takes trial and error to find the job that is right for you. If you're interested in nursing, then try it out! There are local junior colleges that can help get you started at a much lower price if you are also concerned about that. The biggest advice I was always given and now choose to give others is... try it! Try whatever your heart is set on even if you end up having some bumps in the road. The more you stay focused and determined, you will make it through!

Finding a job will be easier with some background skills in nursing and by constantly reminding yourself that this is what you want to do, you will be able to accomplish it!
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much for your that helped me alot Ester
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Diana’s Answer

First, I’m sure you are good at a lot of things! Looking for a job can create some nervousness, however keep in mind that every experience is valuable. If you are unsure of what you want to focus your efforts on, maybe create a list of what you like to do and where you feel your strengths are. For example, I would say that reaching out through CareerVillage is a great start - using your resources! Perhaps use nurses, and you could gather additional information on that particular subject.

As M mentioned above, volunteering is another great way to learn about different careers. Be patient, it may take a little time for you to realize what you’re ultimately most interested in; just remember, everything you learn and experience along the way make you a stronger individual!
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much for your help. I really appreciate Ester
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Estelle’s Answer

You can start by taking nursing classes at a community college. Additionally, you can volunteer at the hospital or work as a nurse's assistant in an office to obtain some experience. It will be worth the effort.
Thank you comment icon Your so sweet thank you so much I will definitely try it thanks for your advice and support Ester
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Rebecca’s Answer

Hi Ester,
Fear is inevitable when you are thinking about making a career choice but don't let your fear get in the way of your success. After having gone through 4 years of nursing school and doing very well I did not pass the NCLEX (nursing exam) and I was devastated. So afraid to fail again I chose not to take the exam again and actually pursued another career in education. My path led me to teaching Kindergarten, which I thoroughly enjoyed! While teaching I met a nurse educator who encouraged me to take the exam again because she knew how sad I was that I did not pass and 6 years later I took the exam and passed!! As a result, I was able to combine my nursing and education careers and started teaching nursing to students at the secondary and college level and was able to encourage students like you who allowed fear to get in the way of their dreams. If we don't live outside of our comfort zones and sometimes feel fear we never grow. So take a leap and grow!!!
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Amber’s Answer

Ester:
Awareness is a place of power, so congratulations on taking the first step on identifying big dreams but also some fears!

The good news is fears can be reasoned with and you can really push through them to reach your goals. The proof? Every single person has fears. You are not alone.

There are many tools out there to push through fears and realize what's holding you back and help you move forward even with some self-doubts along the way (hey, we're human!). One of the tool's that has worked well for me in overcoming fears, is journaling, to write out exactly how I feel. You don't have to worry about the words that come out or the grammar. You can even delete/or throw away the document after. The point is just to get all of your thoughts out. What makes you excited about nursing? What seems scary about applying to college? It's a good reflection exercise to get some of those racing thoughts out of your head and onto paper to reason through.

Good luck! I hope to see you out in the nursing field someday :).

Amber recommends the following next steps:

https://web.noom.com/blog/2020/07/how-to-overcome-anxiety-from-holding-you-back/
https://web.noom.com/blog/2020/02/stop-self-sabotage/
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much for your her! Ester
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Alexandra’s Answer

Hi Ester, I am going to go on a whim and say the majority of the population that attended higher education does not work in the field that they studied. I say that to say, life is a journey and you will never know what you like or what is in store for you if you don't give it a try.

I agree with some of the previous comments, try some volunteer work and get a feel for what you enjoy the most. If you have a local hospital, 9 times out of 10 they have a website that has a section for volunteering. If they do not, then you can definitely reach out to maybe their HR department and inquire about it. You also have the option to just try a few community college classes and get a feel for the material you'd be studying. And the best recommendation is the entry level opportunities in the setting that you'd like to work in.

College is a big commitment but not impossible. I would not worry about the exam as much because once you identify what you want to do and what makes you happy, I am certain you will put forth good effort and do just fine.
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! Ester
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Kim’s Answer

Hi Ester,

So, I let fear of public speaking hold me back for 25 years! Then, I got another job, and I was required to teach classes. yikes!!!!! And guess what? After a while, I grew to like it! Anyway, don't look at it as trying to make a lifelong commitment to any one job or career. Take it in baby steps. Try to set a goal to be settled into a decision and career path by the time you are 25. That gives you time to experiment.

Where to start? A lot depends on if you still live at home or are trying to support yourself. Don't be in a hurry to move out unless it is truly necessary.

Look at the hospitals and see what entry-level positions you could get. This way, you are earning money while deciding if healthcare is right for you. Examples:
1. Patient Transporter. . . they take patients from one location to another, such as to go get an MRI, or x-rays. They also make sure the equipment is kept in working order (wheelchair brakes work, etc). You will learn to help patients to safely transfer from bed to chair, and things like that. Lots of walking.
2. Patient Sitter. . . sits with patients and keeps them company. Contacts the nursing staff for any problems
3. Dietary Aide. . . delivers trays to patients in their rooms. Provides a friendly smile and ensures the meal meets expectations, assists with special requests

The plus side of getting these sorts of jobs, with a hospital, is that the hospitals often provide tuition assistance. So, once you determine you want to take the next step, they will be there to support you! Perhaps it isn't nursing that you want. Perhaps you will decide you want to be a radiology technician. Or an office admin. Should you decide healthcare is not for you, you have gained a lot of "customer service" experience that you can use in applying for any other job out there.

Don't let fear of failure hold you back. It is how we grow. Understanding the concept of "Transferrable skills" (such as customer service, explained above) should help you to see that each job is a step towards the next. The thing I would discourage you from at this point is spending money on school, because, it doesn't sound like you are quite ready to commit yet. Take your time. Explore!
Thank you comment icon OMG this was such a help for me thank you again from the bottom of my heart Ester
Thank you comment icon You are quite welcome! And, remember, we are always here for you. We have students 50 years old that ask questions, so, you are never too old to come back to us for more help! Kim Igleheart
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Jimavis’s Answer

Hello,
Being scared is normal but don't let it define who you are. If is nursing that you want, go after it! Great nurses are produced from one with a good heart. The fear in you says that you have a great heart and don't want to mess up. You will be great!!! The world need great people like you to take care of them. Go For it!!! YOU CAN DO IT!!
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much that really helped me a lot thank you again Ester
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Kimberly’s Answer

Don't let the fear stop you from wanting to become a nurse. It is scary to think you won't pass a test in school or the risk of you may not like it but if you work hard and find an area of nursing that fits you best, you will be great! Use this fear to drive you into accomplishing your goals. If you are worried nursing is not for you, I recommend researching a little more into the field. You can research schools and their programs, reach out to those in the field to ask them questions, and create a pros and cons list as to why you may or may not enjoy nursing. From there, you will be able to make a decision that is best for you! Good luck in your journey! Remember to believe in yourself and you will conquer any fear.
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much I will definitely try my very best Ester
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