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Is the life of an Animator as strict as everyone says it is, or do you have some freedom?

I've been interested in becoming an animator since I was 7 years old,i'm currently 17 years old right now,and I wanted to know what environment/ lifestyle an animator has? #professional #animation #animators #expertise #2d #3d

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Corey’s Answer

I would listen to Twen. If you want to know a little more if at least what I've heard at college then this is what they say. Big companies will have you a more specialized work space. Doing one thing, repetitively. Although its not repetitive as in the samexact thing all the time. It is that you will do one thing on different subject matter projects. This can be broken down as, an animator(moves objects), rigger (make bones and relationships to mesh for animator to use), modeler(organic, hard surface, or character), natural phenomenon simulation(3D FX or fluid dynamics). There are more. If you work for a small company, you can find yourself doing all of the above and for less money, but colleges gain reputation with local companies, so they will pressure the small companies on you if you let them.

I've heard from hostgator (a company that used to hire us at the art institute for prep to go to EA) that there are couches and more amenities alike at these places. It is not for nothing though. As Twen said, long hours are put in. We learn various aspects to everything we do and it is hard work. Take a FX simulator for example. He/she will learn physics and fluid dynamics in order to be a exceptional FX artist. After that you learn how to apply that within software and then how to apply it for your art director for the specific job you are doing. If that does not deserve a couch I do not know what does. I have heard stories of a woman that worked at Disney that is alumni of my college and said it was long hours until she had a family. Instead of having sociable relationships with her colleagues on learning and sharing information, she decided to learn more from books at home and not socialize at work. She cut the 12-16 hours a day to 8 hours a day by doing so, thus giving her more hours with her new family at home.
These are just stories I have heard that puts clarity to the aspects Teen had already stated. Good luck and wish me luck too. I graduate in 7 months.
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Gates’s Answer

Hi Jennifer,


It is super awesome to have a passion like that. Animation takes a ton of hours. There's no way around that. A teacher of mine once said that "animation is the compression of time" because if you actually think about it, you are watching hundreds of someone's hours go by in a few seconds.


Anyone working on an animation project, or art projects in general, dedicates a lot of time to it. I spent four years of college working all day every day on my artwork.


But if you love animation as it seems like you do, you should stick with it because if you love it and practice it, you will eventually be good at it (maybe you already are) and animators get paid quite well! So that is a perk. It is also a rewarding process to watch a character come to life with animation. I think if you follow your passion you will feel more free in general.


All of the animators I know think it is worth the time and effort, and they have a lot of fun!

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Twen Samuel’s Answer

It will depend on the company you work at and the project you work on. However, most company try to have a good work/life balance, but there will be time where we have to crunch (work overtime) to meet deadlines. Different industries will also have different crunch modes. Movies (sfx) industry tends to have tight deadlines. Games and 3D movie industry will have more space out deadlines, but overall, it will depend on the need of the project you work on.


There's not much of a 2D animation industry left in the US. Most animation jobs in the US are 3D animation related. In general, your work and life balance will depend on your priorities.


When I first started out, young and single, I didn't mind working longer hours because I was doing something I love and learning a lot from my peers. As you grow older, get into relationships, and start a family, your priorities will change. Work and Life balance will become a lot more important and you will have to find companies that share in your views. There are plenty out there.


Except Japan. Don't do 2D animation in Japan : D

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Robert T’s Answer

I am a graphic artist and have done very little animation, I do know that animation is very labor intensive, about 1,200 animation cells per minute I believe.

Thank you comment icon What do you do as a graphic artist and what is the salary? Jennifer
Thank you comment icon I freelance, working mostly in comics. I charge about $80.00 - $100.00 for inked Black and white or about $120.00 for color interior pages. For cover I charge more depending on what they want. I also do pinups T-shirts and some ad work. Robert T Baumer
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