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What was the hardest part about becoming a Chef?

Please don't be afraid to go into detail with this question, i wanna know as much as i can from actual professionals.

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Tyler’s Answer

The hardest part in becoming a chef is staying consistent and reminding your self on why you want to be a chef. Second is what it takes to be a chef. To be a leader, to understand that you are not always in control, to take control even though others may hate you for it. Staying true to your principles when the establishment cares more about financial outcomes than the food. The hardest part of becoming a chef is staying true to yourself.
Thank you comment icon This is really well said! Jamal Jimenez
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Jamal’s Answer

Of course!
So the first shift is usually a prepping shift. You would spend anywhere from 1-3 hours turning on your equipment, setting everything up for the day, and making sure you have enough food prep to last the restaurant the day with little food waste. Make sure everything is fresh and ready to be served. I believe its the most important shift because you can set up the kitchen for success or failure.
Every restaurant has certain “peak” periods. In all honesty, it can get very hot, stressful, and, frustrating. You have 10+ orders that meed to be filled in a timely manner. Make sure every order is leaving to the customer at the same time, fresh, and correctly. Communicating effectively and clearly with your cooks and servers is a must. During all this you have to keep your area as clean as possible and avoid cross contamination. You have to be able to think of resolutions quickly and move at a fast pace. Being able to multi task is a huge plus!!
Dinner time is usually the busier time of most places. There are usually more bodies in the kitchen and can get crowded and messy. Being able to not let it affect you and still lead your crew will have every restaurant owner grateful. Closing shift you are responsible the completely cleaning the kitchen, throwing out and tracking food waste, getting things ready for the morning prep shift.
Ive been blessed to be a kitchen manager multiple times at local restaurants opening for their first time. So i got to assist in writing menus and recipes. Ordering of products and setting rules and guidelines as well as hiring my own staff for the kitchen.
Make sure you are book smart with temperatures and food safety. Understand cross contamination and FIFI (first in, first out).
I hope this helps! Let me know if you have any more questions! I love to help however i can!
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Jamal’s Answer

Hey Luis! I want to start off by letting you know i am not a certified chef, however i have worked in and managed several kitchens.
There are many, many challenges associated with becoming a chef. Ill name and touch on a few things I believe are important to becoming a chef.
Being able to lead a team in high pressure situations is a huge asset. You are looked at as the lead in a kitchen. You have to have very clear communication. You absolutely have to put aside stress and frustration or you will transfer it to everyone else.
Food safety is also at the top of the list. Memorizing different temperatures, recipes, cool times, etc. There are so many codes and safety hazards that you have to be on top of to ensure the best food quality and reduce food born illnesses.
That is just a little touch on the subject and i hope that it helps out!
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much for replying! Is there any way you could maybe tell me more about what goes on in a kitchen? I feel like if i know what's to come, I'll be more mentally prepared and ready to manage a kitchen in the future. Once again, thank you for your time. Luis
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