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I am 15 years old and I feel like I should have some idea of what I should do or be in the future. I feel like I am not good at anything. Any ideas on how I should figure out?

I am 15, I make good grades (4.6 gpa), im in all honors and AP courses, im athletic, im tall and skinny, i play travel sports all year round, I was a spirit leader last year, im full of energy, i have adhd, i am nervous about presenting in large crowds but i can talk to large crowds, i take latin, im good at science (kinda bad when in comes to physics though), im in love with high fashion, im naturally good at algebra (meh at geometry) not the best writer, LOVE to travel ( i always wanna move to a new place so id love a job that would allow me to travel) im very creative and good at improvising. :) thanks #fashion #sports-management #art #college #unsure #future #travel #chef #technology #medicine

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Subject: Career question for you

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Doc’s Answer

Audrey the first thing to consider when picking a major is what you like to do?

By the time you graduate high school you’ll have enough information and experience from your classes to figure out what you might or might not be interested in pursuing. It's one of the first big independent decisions of your academic life. Most likely your parents have hammered into you, choosing a major in college is an important decision. It's important to listen to your parents' concerns and advice. However, it's important for you to remember it's ultimately your major. You will have to do the work and ultimately leverage that major as you transition into the workforce.

WHAT ARE YOUR INTERESTS?

• LIST 10 THINGS YOU LOVE – Listing what you love doing, both inside or outside the classroom, is a great way to see possible paths you can take. If you enjoy art and drawing but you’re also interested in technology, consider majoring in graphic design. If you’re into business and traveling, investigate majoring in international business.

• STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES – Figuring out your strengths and weaknesses can help you assess what kind of major to go into. For example, if public speaking isn’t really your thing, you might want to avoid majors that could lead to careers like being a news anchor or spokesperson. You can also take your weaknesses and build on them in college. If public speaking is something you want to improve, go ahead and take a speech class. You might love it!

• ADVISERS – The best source of college advice is your school counselor. They’ve helped lots of students who are making the same decisions you are. Your school counselor can tell you more about college majors and program offerings.

• PROFESSIONALS – You can also reach out to professionals working in the field you’re interested in. They can talk to you about how they got from college to where they are now. Whether they’re your parents, guardians, family members, or people you interact with professionally, set up a time to interview them. Be prepared with a set of questions to ask.

WHAT ARE YOUR CAREER GOALS?

After digging into what you’re interested in and potential careers options, it’s time to think about your goals and your future career—and how easy or how hard it might be to find employment. If you have a specific career goal in mind, you might need to pick your major or program in advance, sometimes as early as when you’re applying to college. It’s also good to know what degree you’ll need for the field that interests you.

1. FASHION DESIGNER – Clothes of different cuts, sizes, and fabrics don’t just magically drape themselves on the human body. To create the initial pattern, a designer must craft a 3-D garment on 2-D fabric, which requires a knowledge of geometry. Of course, the garment has to fit the model in all the right places and be scaled up appropriately for different sizes, which means it also involves algebra and arithmetic. And in order to make a profit, the designer has to calculate the cost of the fabric and labor, then determine how much he or she should charge for a piece of clothing.
• SALARY OUTLOOK – The average Fashion Designer I salary in the United States is $55,000 as of May 28, 2020, but the range typically falls between $45,000 and $65,000. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

2.) CARTOGRAPHER – Back in the days of the explorers, cartographers made maps using sundials, compasses, and telescopes, pinpointing and drawing out different locations with all the information available to them (which, in the early days of mapmaking, wasn’t very much). Today, cartographers use aerial imagery and digital databases to make maps, sometimes indicating three dimensions on paper or a screen. Even though computers now help with many calculations, cartographers need to know algebra, calculus, trigonometry, geology, and statistics.
• SALARY OUTLOOK – The average Cartographer salary in the United States is $60,000 as of May 28, 2020, but the salary range typically falls between $55,000 and $75,000. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

3.) CORPORATE CONSULTANT – Companies regularly hire consultants to offer insight and advice on how to fix complex problems in their business and industry. The main skill required for consulting is to have specialized knowledge in a particular field. Since this knowledge is so exclusive, a consultant is likely to have clients dispersed across the country, and often across the globe. Travel is integral to this job since close relationships with clients are important for maintaining working partnerships. For people who are social and love to travel, this job is an ideal way to see the globe while earning a great income.
• SALARY OUTLOOK – The average Consultant salary in the United States is $80,000 as of May 28, 2020. The range for our most popular Consultant positions (listed below) typically falls between $69,000 and $115,000. Keep in mind that salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including position, education, certifications, additional skills, and the number of years you have spent in your profession.

4.) AU PAIR – A classic way to travel, learn a language and experience a new culture, working as an au pair won't earn you big bucks but will provide you with a roof over your head, food and plenty of time to explore. Au pairs are needed all over the world and work is often part time. Some experience in childcare is beneficial but a personality match and positive attitude will be far more of a deal maker when searching for a family. Numerous jobs around the world makeg it easy to string contracts together to work your way around the globe.
• SALARY OUTLOOK – The average Au Pair salary in the United States is $30,000 as of May 28, 2020, but the salary range typically falls between $25,500 and $45,000. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

5.) FLIGHT ATTENDANT – One of the best jobs that allow you to travel is being a flight attendant. Most flight attendants start out in the United States initially, before being allowed to operate longer flights that hit travel destinations such as Japan, Canada, and Southeast Asia. You’ll travel on stunning aircrafts to different countries all while earning a nice income and good benefits. Skills such as speaking a foreign language and CPR training are also highly valued by airline hiring managers. Many airlines post their job opportunities directly on their own websites and it’s useful to pick an airline which operates lots of flights from your home airport to limit your commute time on flight days.
• SALARY OUTLOOK – The average Flight Attendant salary in the United States is $77,000 as of May 28, 2020, but the range typically falls between $62,500 and $95,500. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession.

Remember Audrey, though this is an important decision, it is not etched in stone. If you start taking classes within your major and find you’re not enjoying them, switch classes or start trying classes in another major immediately. In fact, about two-thirds of undergraduates switch their major at least once, so keep that in mind as you take classes your first year.

Hope this was Helpful Audrey
Thank you comment icon This is the most thorough answer I've ever had to a question in my life :) I feel like I should have paid you for it ahaha. Thank you so much this was extremely helpful and thank you for taking the time to write out such a long detailed response. You're pretty good at this whole answering questions thing :) have a good day Audrey
Thank you comment icon Thank You Audrey, It was my Pleasure. Build your own dreams, or someone else will hire you to build theirs. Keep reaching for the Stars. Doc Frick
Thank you comment icon Thank You Gabrielle. “At the end of the day it’s not about what you have or even what you’ve accomplished… it’s about who you’ve lifted up, who you’ve made better. It’s about what you’ve given back.” – Denzel Washington Doc Frick
Thank you comment icon These are great suggestions so I didn't want to make an entire new post. What I did want to say is that it is okay to now know what you want to do and it is also okay to do different things over the course of your life. A professor once told me that having 5 careers in your lifetime is healthy and a reflection that you are speaking to your passions. I did a major career change when I was 35. It wasn't that I didn't like what I I was doing up to then, but I wanted to feed other passions. So it is okay to not have the answers right now. Stacey Taylor
Thank you comment icon Thank You Stacey. “Alone, we can do so little; together we can do so much.” – Helen Keller Doc Frick
Thank you comment icon Thank You Meighan. Volunteering is the ultimate exercise in democracy. We vote in elections very four years, but when we volunteer, we vote every day about the kind of community we want to live in. Doc Frick
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Gabi’s Answer

Hi Audrey,

First off, most people do not know what they want to do when they're 15, so you are not alone in that! It sounds like you have a lot of interests and there are a lot of careers that would bring you joy. I would recommend exploring your interests even more and start building skills in things that you're curious about and that excite you. Also remember that when picking a career, it's not only important to think about what you would be good at and what would be fun for you, but also what will be good for your mental health and happiness in the long term.

Some questions you can ask yourself...
-How important is salary to you vs. something potentially more fun/glamorous but lower paying?
-If you're interested in a creative career, will turning your creative passion into work make it less enjoyable for you?
-Do you want to be your own boss or work for someone?
-How important is a good work environment. What does a good work environment look like to you?
-What does the career path look like? Where would I start? Where would my end goal be?
-What education is needed for this career path?
-What would my day to day look like?
-What skills are important for someone in that career?
-What companies and/or industries would I be working in? Which ones interest me? Would I like working for them?
-Is this career path growing or is hiring beginning to slow down in this area?

Now is your time to explore and figure out what interests you! There's lots of time to decide. Some people end up even doing full career switches way after college. Sounds like you're on the right track and probably farther ahead than a lot of other people your age by asking these questions now.

Hope you have a good summer!

Gabi

Gabi recommends the following next steps:

List out all the careers you want to explore
List the things that are most important to you in a job. Then prioritize them by numerical importance.
As you research different careers, score those career options based on your prioritized numbers.
Take online classes (Masterclass, Lynda, YouTube, etc.) to learn about careers and build technical skills
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Jing’s Answer

Hi Audrey,

There are a lot of professions that allow you to work remotely so you can still enjoy travel and pursuit your other passions. For example, a lot of tech companies now allowing employees in engineering, data scientist, business analysis, and product management functions to work remotely. Without the limitation of work location and with the good compensation you can easily enjoy the lifestyle you are describing.

Good luck!
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the ideas!! Audrey
Thank you comment icon A common term for that is Digital Nomad. It's pretty cool. Sarah Pederson
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Deeksha’s Answer

To be honest, it is very natural to not know what your goals are at age 15. I think you have a sufficient time of 3 years to figure out. I would suggest you to explore yourself for 3 years till the time you are 18. If you like travelling so try to figure out what kind of places do you like. If you enjoy trekking or mountainous areas, then you can start your profession in trekking. If you like luxury travelling then you can be a part of Hotel management, travel blogger etc. I think you have plenty of time to explore your hobbies and finalize the things you really want in your life.

Deeksha recommends the following next steps:

Enjoy your teenage years
Keep exploring different sports, different places
Make a diary of your daily experiences
List down thing which you really enjoy
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Scott’s Answer

With what you like and how you describe yourself think hotel. Resort management Creating events working with chefs florists. Event planners. Lots of opportunity for travel. In fact that is a positive in your favor that you will move and travel.
It's a shorter college stint so you won't be saddlec with large debt.
Being in new Orleans this is a natural. Or go-to the casinos in lake charles

Scott recommends the following next steps:

Do an apprenticechip with a event planner or great chef.
Thank you comment icon Those are good ideas! Thanks for answering :) Audrey
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David’s Answer

I'll be blunt. You shouldn't know what you have to do for the rest of your life at 15.

Explore. Learn. Absorb as much as you can from the people around you.

Don't worry about finding the perfect career, although thinking about it can't hurt. And honestly, you may not find something "perfect."

One thing I would suggest is to not think about it so much as to go on a platform such as this.

I'm 19 and I still am unsure what I want to do. BUT - I know more than when I did at 15. I spent the four years in between having an open mind, learning about things I liked. That said, don't expect it to go swimmingly - everyone goes through ups and downs. Good luck! And take some time off careervillage!
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Melanie’s Answer

I think that a career in Hospitality Management would be great for you. You sound very creative and friendly. You would feel fulfilled making people's day/ creating memorable experiences.

I would be a little concerned about the direction of the industry because of the concerns around the pandemic so my advice would be to also come up with one more option as a back up to study. A business management degree could be good, and maybe you can use that to work at non-profits or get into philanthropic work.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for the idea and for answering :) Audrey
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Ankita’s Answer

Hi Audrey,
A lot of people have given you some great advise. I would like to add my personal experience (i.e. what has helped me) and share that with you. I think its great that you have started to list out areas that you are good/passionate at and areas where you can improve/not so passionate about. In my career i have always taken a Bottom up approach meaning i have a list of my skills, competencies, passions and interests. i then map those to some of the industries or areas that i may be interested in (its also ok to be industry agnostic). Once you have this list you can search for roles or keywords on Linkedln or other job side and see the job descriptions that come up and apply to roles that are a good mix - i.e. where you can showcase some of your existing skills and also have an opportunity to learn and grow. Lastly, i also think its a trial and error process, the more your try out new things you will get a sense of what you actually like vs. what you do not like which in the long run will help you narrow down you career search.

Good Luck and i am certain you are going t do great.
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Brandon’s Answer

Hi, Audrey -

Don't shortchange yourself and say you aren't good at anything. From what I am reading, you are a really impressive teenager. My advice is simple: continue learning and trying/experiencing new things. Don't let the pressure of 'societal norms' (e.g. knowing what you want to do and having a strict plan) paralyze you with anxiety or stress. You have plenty of life to figure out what you want to do. The reality is it can change overtime based on you changing your skills, interests, and directions in life.

Try to identify some of the key values and motivations in your life (your "why's" for living and what excites you the most) and let that guide you. Seek to learn new things, meet new people, and better yourself every day and you will be set!
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Samantha’s Answer

Its okay if you dont know what you want to be when older. You still have a little bit before u have to decide. Explore what you enjoy doing. Like if you like tinkering try taking a mechanics class. If you love to draw take an art class. If you love to play video games take coding or graphic design. The best way to find it is to look at what u enjoy doing and are passionate about.
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Helen’s Answer

Hi Audrey,
Understand the feeling, I was in the same situation. Just, don't think you are not good at all. Sometimes the most obvious task is the one that you end up enjoying the most. Would recommend to check colleagues portfolio, check activities at your school, ask you school counselor. At the end, the best choice will be the one that makes you feel good :)
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Kaylee’s Answer

Hey you are still young so do not stress out too much but something that would help would to be to look up something you are interested in doing now and see if that could become a career or something similar to it. hope this helps!
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Sarah’s Answer

When I was 15, all I knew was I wanted to do "Science". It's all about narrowing down as you get older. Also, you can always change it, even in your 30s!

I liked my Chem class junior year so I chose to major in Chemistry - so I could be a "Chemist" (I didn't really know what that meant). Then I didn't like it, so I switched to a double major in Physics and Engineering - so I could be an "Engineer". Then I couldn't narrow down what kind of engineer I wanted to be, so I graduated with a BS in Applied Physics, knowing I could always go back to school to get an engineering degree if I figured out what I wanted. In school, I took technical electives in Computer Science and now I'm a Software Engineer.

That all goes to show, you don't have to have it figured out yet. Learn, adapt, and change.

Your career doesn't define you, it's just what you do on weekdays. Some people live for their job, others have a job so they can live. What I mean is you can love your job and have your life revolve around it, or you can just have a job so that you can live your life. I'm in the latter category so I work to pay the bills then travel on my time off. I didn't pick a job that lets me travel.

Things I learned along the way:
- There are so many career options, most of which you haven't even thought about
- Before you pick a major, look at how much schooling people usually do. All of my Physics classmates who are Physicists went on to get their PhDs. I never wanted to do that much schooling, so I'm glad I didn't go down that path.
- Don't just think about the job, but also look at the environment/culture in the industry. If you want to be in software, the tech industry (startups in particular) is a bunch of cool nerds - there's a good chance of playing ping pong at work, but you might also work 50 hr weeks. If you want to be in service/hospitality, you make things beautiful and solve problems, but customers will yell at you. In research (aka pure science/math) you get to work on totally new things and are on the cutting edge, but you also have to write a lot of grants.
- Not everything needs a 4 year degree. For high achievers in high school, getting a bachelors degree has probably always seemed mandatory.
- Internships are great at narrowing down what you want to do. That's how I knew I didn't want to do research.
- Decide roughly what type of work you want to do. Do you want to be in STEM? It's not too hard to switch majors in your first few years and still graduate on time.
- There's no shame in taking a gap year and trying stuff. Take free online courses, do an internship, start a job you think you'd enjoy. My sister spent 10s of thousands of dollars at college trying to fit what our parents wanted her to be, now she's a dog groomer and loves it! Does she have extra money to take big trips or live in a big house? Not really. Does she love going to work every day? Absolutely. You might have to choose which matters more to you.

Sarah recommends the following next steps:

Take a career quiz or strengths finder - your high school guidance counselor probably has options.
Check with your parent's friends about their jobs. If any interest you, ask to shadow them. Most people will say yes.
If you want to be a creator (e.g. photographer, fashion designer, artist), Start now! There's nothing stopping you
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Steve’s Answer

You sound like a well rounded teenager with a bright future. When I was 15 I never dreamed I had any skills in IT! Take lots of different classes, read and research, be active socially and in school groups and just see what happens. You are fortunate you have so many choices ahead of you while possessing many talents. Enjoy discovering what is important to you in life and finding out what makes you happy!
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Shara’s Answer

Hi there! If travel is important to you, you may want to pursue a career in marketing events. It allows you to be creative and from my experience, you are able to build your career within a team, so that should help you with some of the anxiety that comes with speaking to groups. You are able to also help create an event from the ground up, and then execute it with your teammates, often in very exciting places.