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I just need some advice and opinions! :)

I plan on going to a safety school because it offers the courses I need, and it's financially more practical. Although it's not highly renowned I feel like that won't matter as much when I apply to grad school (medicine). I've been told that the college you go to doesn't affect your chances of the med schools you could get into- so in theory, is my plan feasible?

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Hassan’s Answer

What medical schools do you want to attend? Which undergraduate schools represent the most folks admitted to those Med schools?

I'm not sure if med schools published where their enrollment is coming from but https://www.collegetransitions.com/dataverse/top-feeders-medical-school has a list of top two schools per med school. Their methodology seems sound but it only identified the top feeder schools.

That doesn't mean you can't get in from another school. However, it may increase your changes if you attend one of those top feeder schools for undergrad.

https://blog.prepscholar.com/best-pre-med-schools and https://www.savvypremed.com/blog/the-10-best-colleges-for-pre-meds-in-every-region also have list of best pre-med schools.
Thank you comment icon I see, thanks so much! Anita
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Ross’s Answer

Make sure that the school you plan to attend is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges & Schools. You can also cut your expenses by getting some of your prerequisites at a community college. Make sure to ask the university recruiters what their percentage of acceptance is to medical schools.

In the end, acceptance comes down to your GPA, MCat scores & how rounded you are in your experiences and community service. You have to think about what you can do to separate yourself from the other medical school applicants. Good luck in your academic & career goals!
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much! I'll definitely consider this. Anita
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Tamara’s Answer

Hello Anita,

That’s a great question. Where you attend undergraduate school usually is less important than where you attend graduate school. This might or might not be so depending on your demographics that include race and class and depending on your personal, professional, and academic goals. The discussion regarding your question is complicated and nuanced. Here are some podcasts that provide a great deal of information for consideration:

The Takeaway
“Admissions and the Value of Higher Education” in “The Takeaway’s The Role Facebook Played in the Attack on the U.S. Capitol” that aired on 26 October 2021.
https://www.npr.org/podcasts/381444253/pri-the-takeaway?fbclid=IwAR0Cv1qiDNGe1fKQhfymQ5kGh60vcmplbE-LIpH4ZJwXZR1ZsW04wCy0lPM

Freakonomics Radio Goes Back to School (especally the second episode: “The University of Impossible-to-Get-Into”)
https://freakonomics.com/podcast-tag/freakonomics-radio-goes-back-to-school/

I hope this helps!
Thank you comment icon This is great, thanks! Anita
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Michelle’s Answer

Yes, I think your plan is feasible, and your best option.

My advice is: pick a school that is financially feasible and offers a solid foundation. Focus on your performance and building healthy habits, take opportunities to try new things and build your portfolio of experiences. Wherever you are, make friends and connections with peers, educators, and trusted advisors who will become a network of support as you move through school and career.

In my experience, the renown of the institution you choose is less important to grad schools and employers than your performance and overall ability to communicate and successfully navigate within an organization.

Paying more to go to an elite school will only put you in debt - not a a situation you want to be in as you're heading into medical school.

Good luck to you!
Thank you comment icon This was super helpful, thank you! Anita
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