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What is the projected job growth?

I am wondering what opportunities come from the job and how it can grow.

Thank you comment icon Hi Cooper! I see you have tagged your question with "business" and "management". In the future, please also include the name of the career you are asking about when you write a question. This will assure that Professionals know exactly what you are asking, and you can get the advice you are looking for! Thanks for posting on CareerVillage. Alexandra Carpenter, Admin

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Kelsa’s Answer

Hello,
As it has been stated, it is imperative to know what type of job you are talking about. Whilst almost every job has a job/role above it, knowing if there would be substantial growth without knowing the field is improbable. Whatever sector you go into and whatever job you take up, learn transferable skills and be prepared to apply them in case you decide down the line to change your field
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Mary’s Answer

Hi Cooper,

I see you are interested in business management. There will always be a need for business managers, and as senior leaders leave, others within the organization will be given the opportunity to grow. You need to position yourself as the obvious choice for promotion.

My best advice is not to wait for business growth and positions to open to prepare yourself for the next position you want. Often employees enter the workforce and wait for others to select them for advancement. I believe you need to design your own career path and determine where you want to be five and ten years from now. You can always change what you want, but having a road map helps you focus on the correct type of skill development early on.

You've likely heard the phrase "dress for the job you want" well, I say train for the job you want. Once you have your road map, you can use it to know when to step up and say yes to projects and opportunities. You will also want to share your career goals with your manager so they can support you in getting to the next level.

Since each company is different, you should talk with your manager about your career goals and get their advice on achieving your goals. I often have enlisted my manager's manager for an extra level of support.

The main thing is not to wait for others to notice you. If you want to move up quickly, then take time to study the upcoming positions and share your strategy in a written proposal on why you are the best person to fill the role. Best of luck in your career!
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Jaclyn’s Answer

Hi Cooper,

I think it is important to know which types of jobs here you are talking about. I would say ones involving software and technology have great opportunities and will only increase as we continue automating processes. However, people will always need medical personnel to help with illnesses so I am expecting good growth potential there as well. Another area that people seem to overlook is technical skills and trade schools. As college is being pushed more and more the rates of people learning essential trades like plumbing and car mechanics is decreasing. Because they are getting harder to find the starting salary will keep increasing because there is still a need for these services. Especially if you do not like the idea of sitting at a desk for most of the day I would highly suggest going to trade school and learning a marketable skill. Plus you would not have the student debt burden that many college students face.

I would think about "would I need this job done in the future"? If you have seen restaurants with the ability to order and pay at the table without a server that can suggest fewer of those positions might be needed in the future. If the answer is yes this job will still be needed then it has potential to stick around. The United States is largely a services market and less of a physical goods market. Fewer and fewer things seem to be made in the US, that is not to say it will not change and we can go back to a more manufacturing economy, we have just been moving away from it so far.
Thank you comment icon Thank you for sharing your perspective. cooper
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