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I'm good in biology but I don't want to go in medical field. I love engineering but I'm not good in math. So I'm struggling what to do?

I would choose any career related to biology but with less involvement in medical field. I think that kind if job is hard to find but at least I need some kind of suggestions from anyone.

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Ann’s Answer

Great question! Figuring out the right career path is always difficult. Don't be stressed, because most people, including myself got into careers by chance and not by following a set path.

The biggest piece of advice I can give is study what you enjoy and the career opportunities will follow. Biology is a good field to study depending on what areas you focus on. Yes, it most often leads to the medical field, but there are options outside of that. A few examples are, Microbiologist, Quality Assurance Tester and Environmental Lawyer. I've included a couple resources to help.

Ann recommends the following next steps:

Take a look at this article https://www.careeraddict.com/biology-degree-careers. There are a number of medical field occupations but a bunch that aren't.
Search the job titles you found interesting in the article on the site onetonline.org. This site gives a deeper dive into what the job entails, the education needed, salary averages and career outlook.
Thank you comment icon Your advice was so helpful! Sapna
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Ian’s Answer

You can try to find a job that has your perfect balance of tech and bio.

There's technicians, specialists, consultants, analysts, bioengineers, bioinformatics, biostatistics, machine learning/AI, data science.

A lot of the math you need for bioinformatics and biostatistics is not calculation-based, but theory-based. It's more important to understand how and why it works than do it from scratch (especially when you already have computing machines to do the computing for you. I'm sure you can pick it up with some hard-work and office hours.

Data science & machine learning are promising fields too, and they often require some programming skills.

As others here have said, if you want to do Bio there are a lot of non-medical options as well. Many, like the biology teacher, don't require much tech/math background.
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Elizabeth’s Answer

If you really love Biology you'd be a great teacher. I helped other students with test prep in biology before dental school. I really enjoyed helping people who thought they didn't like Biology do well and excel.

Depending on how much math you are willing to take you can do something more technical in the medical field. Dentistry requires at lest Physic 1 and 2 on college as well as some prerequisites and statistics. This is much less than an engineer would need.
Biology teachers have been in demand in my area high schools. If you have any other questions let me know!
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Suzanne’s Answer

Sapna, great questions! I don't know much about engineering...perhaps someone in that field can address that...but I can tell you that there are lots of non-medical career paths in biology. You can work in research labs like in universities or governmental agencies or research foundations. You can work as a wildlife biologist, an animal caretaker, a biology teacher, a geneticist, an agriculture researcher or technician. You can become an environmental scientist. There is also a field called "bioengineering" which would combine both your interests.

In biology there will be some need for learning math, typically through the level of calculus and often biostatistics can be helpful. The key, I found, is to speak up early. Let the advisors, teachers or professors know you are worried about the course and find ways to get extra help...whether it's from tutors, or spending time with professors or teaching assistants during their office hours getting extra attention.

Good luck and please write back with further questions.

Suzanne recommends the following next steps:

Lots more ideas to be found on the website o*net from US Department of Labor https://www.onetonline.org/find/result?s=biologist
Thank you comment icon Thanks, can't wait to put this advice into action! Sapna
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Jane’s Answer

I think you should go to college and take electives in different areas of study. Talk with your guidance counselor for direction. Talk to students who are in biology and engineering. Consider optometry or dentistry. You don’t have to declare a major yet as a freshman so be adventurous and take a variety of classes.
Good luck!
Thank you comment icon Thanks for your encouragement! Sapna
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