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How to learn how to make a full anime episodes?

Hello I really need help. I'm in an art class with a group of art students and we draw anime characters and others kind of art work. We just had an idea to make or learn how to make a full anime episode and need suggestions!

It's dream and to my friends! #japan #animation #3d-animation #computer-animation #anime #character-animation

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Subject: Career question for you

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Eric’s Answer

Hi Maddy,
Here's one way you could go about doing it. You'll need to learn some animation software. Here's a nice list for some applications you can download - http://www.toptenreviews.com/software/multimedia/best-2d-animation-software/


Pick one of these to learn and download it. Many companies offer their software for free to students, so it might be worth checking out. Once you've picked a program to learn, start watching tutorials on youtube, for example, to learn how to use the software.


It won't be easy, but that's just the way it is at first. And it will ALWAYS take a lot of work. Don't let that discourage you, but just be prepared to work. The more you practice and improve your art skills, and learn the software, the easier it will be.


This should get you of to a great start.


Good luck and happy animating!

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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Maddy,

Mastering the Art of Crafting a Full Anime Episode

The journey to producing a complete anime episode is a blend of artistic flair, narrative prowess, and technical expertise. Here's a roadmap to guide you in mastering the art of crafting a full anime episode:

1. Grasp the Fundamentals of Animation: Prior to embarking on your anime creation journey, it's crucial to grasp the rudiments of animation. This includes understanding keyframes, timing, movement, and character design. Initiate your learning journey with traditional 2D animation techniques and principles.

2. Get Acquainted with Digital Animation Software: Crafting anime episodes requires proficiency in digital animation tools. Industry favorites include Adobe Animate (previously Flash), Toon Boom Harmony, and Clip Studio Paint. These software programs are equipped with features tailored for animators.

3. Hone Your Narrative Skills: An integral part of anime creation is storytelling. Strive to create captivating narratives, intriguing characters, and gripping plotlines. A solid grasp of story structure, character development, and pacing is vital for a successful anime episode.

4. Draft Storyboards: Storyboarding is an indispensable step in the animation process, facilitating the planning of your anime episode's visual sequence. Map out each scene frame by frame to set the story's flow, camera angles, and character movements.

5. Concentrate on Character Design: Anime is celebrated for its distinctive and expressive character designs. Invest time in refining your character design skills to create unforgettable and visually striking characters for your anime episode.

6. Understand Voice Acting and Sound Design: Voice acting is pivotal in animating anime characters. Consider collaborating with voice actors or learning basic voice acting techniques. Also, focus on sound design elements like background music and sound effects to enrich the overall viewing experience.

7. Experiment with Animation Techniques: Try out various animation techniques such as keyframe animation, tweening, and motion graphics to animate your characters and scenes. Experiment with diverse styles and methods to discover what suits your anime episode best.

8. Team Up with Others: Crafting a full anime episode can be intricate and time-intensive. Think about teaming up with other artists, animators, writers, or voice actors who are equally passionate about anime production. A team effort can help share tasks and bring varied skills to the project.

By adhering to these steps and consistently honing your animation skills, you are well on your way to producing your own full anime episodes.

Top 3 Credible Sources Utilized in Answering this Question:

Animation Mentor: An online animation school offering courses by industry experts. Their resources offer invaluable insights into animation techniques and industry's best practices.

Toon Boom Animation Blog: A leading animation software provider used by professionals globally. Their blog provides tutorials, tips, and resources for budding animators keen to learn more about digital animation tools.

Adobe Creative Cloud Tutorials: Adobe Creative Cloud offers tutorials on various software programs, including Adobe Animate (Flash). These tutorials address essential skills required for digital animation production.

These sources were referenced to provide reliable information on effectively learning to create full anime episodes, based on industry standards and best practices in animation production.

BLESSINGS, JC.
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Corey’s Answer

Animation is typically done at 24 frames per second. You can draw in 2's or 3's. If you decide 2's is clean enough, then it will be 1 drawing every 2 frames and therefore 12 drawings per second. If you decide to draw in 3's then you will draw 1 drawing for every three frames, thus making the sequence 8 drawings per second. You can draw on paper, with a light board. Place the previous drawing under the next drawing to be drew, so you have a good idea on where the motion will go. If you do not want to do it traditionally, then I recommend ToonBoom software. It is the cheapest and you don't have to pay monthly like Photoshop. You will then need a drawing tablet for your computer. I have the knockoff brand, but I advise getting the Wacom bamboo (the cheapest Wacom). The drivers will be easily installed on your computer without hassle. If you do get a knockoff, beware the pressure sensitivity will most likely have issues. Mine did through several different computers, but I wrote a file to tell windows to use the pressure sensitivity.

That should get you started. A more fine tuned example is "Looney Tunes," I believe, drew in 1's. 1 drawing for every frame. Meaning 24 drawings for every second.

Another example is, "One Piece." I look at it and can see they sometimes draw in 2's, 3's, 4's. Most of the time they have 1 drawing that has a camera moving in or out. They sometimes have one drawing with a camera on it for a few seconds. It baffles me how it is so famous.

You can take from that, that it is all about the story more so than it is about the quality of drawing. This still doesn't mean not to try.
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