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what is the hardest obstacle in armed/unarmed security? How do you over come that obstacle?

interested in security and wanting to learn more about this field. What certificates are recommended and/or needed.

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James Constantine’s Answer

Dear Joseph,

Mastering Armed/Unarmed Security:

The most formidable challenge in armed/unarmed security is consistently being alert to the situation at hand and making immediate decisions in intense situations. Security experts often encounter unpredictable and potentially hazardous situations that demand swift, decisive action to safeguard their own lives and those of others. This difficulty is heightened in armed security roles, where the presence of firearms introduces an additional layer of intricacy and accountability.

Strategies to Conquer this Challenge:

Training and Readiness: In-depth training programs emphasizing scenario-based activities, conflict resolution, de-escalation methods, and firearm competence are crucial for security professionals to cultivate the required skills and self-assurance to manage tough situations effectively.

Critical Thinking Abilities: Cultivating robust critical thinking abilities is vital for security staff to identify threats, assess risks, and make informed decisions promptly. Regular practice of scenario analysis and decision-making exercises can enhance cognitive performance under pressure.

Efficient Communication: Transparent and succinct communication is essential in defusing potentially explosive situations. Security professionals should be trained in efficient communication techniques to engage with individuals in a calm, assertive, and professional manner.

Ongoing Education: Keeping abreast of industry best practices, legal rules, and emerging security trends is crucial for security professionals to effectively adapt to changing threats and challenges. Participation in continuous professional development through workshops, seminars, and certifications can bolster knowledge and skills.

Suggested Certifications for Security Professionals:

Security Guard License/Certification: A fundamental requirement for employment in the security industry, this certification verifies that an individual has fulfilled the necessary training and background verification requirements to legally perform security tasks.

CPR/First Aid Certification: Vital for promptly and effectively responding to medical emergencies, this certification provides security professionals with life-saving skills that can make a significant impact in critical situations.

Firearms Training/Certification: For armed security roles, proper firearms training and certification are essential to ensure safe usage, shooting competence, and adherence to relevant laws and regulations governing firearms.

Advanced Security Certifications (e.g., CPP, PSP): Pursuing advanced certifications like Certified Protection Professional (CPP) or Physical Security Professional (PSP) can showcase expertise in specialized areas of security management, risk evaluation, and threat reduction.

By obtaining these certifications and continuously refining their skills through training and practice, security professionals can better equip themselves to tackle the challenges they may face in armed/unarmed security roles.

Top 3 Reliable Sources Used:

ASIS International: ASIS International is a premier organization committed to promoting security management practices globally. Their resources on training, certifications, and best practices in the security industry are highly respected.

National Association of Security Companies (NASCO): NASCO offers valuable insights into the private security sector, providing advice on industry standards, training programs, and professional development opportunities for security professionals.

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA): OSHA establishes guidelines for workplace safety, including those related to security operations. Their regulations on training requirements and safety protocols are essential references for security professionals aiming to enhance their skills and compliance with industry norms.

Stay Blessed!
James Constantine.
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James’s Answer

Hello! I am currently a Marine Security Guard working at U.S. Diplomatic Missions abroad. I am armed when I work. The biggest challenge I think I face is being constantly ready for something that might never come. Depending on the environment you work in, you could be in dangerous situations every day. You could also be in environments where things are quiet for months, and then the thing you fear happening finally arrives. The worst is the latter. You have to fight a constant battle with complacency every time you strap on your firearm. Those I protect depend on me for their safety. Preparing for a moment where everyone is looking to you is difficult.
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Sikawayi’s Answer

I can only answer this question from the experiences I have had in the military. Although my primary job was not security, I have had spent a lot of time in this field as a secondary job. For starters, training has to be completed and this consists of classroom, physical, and practical. For me this was a two-week course, remember this was not my primary job. I would imagine for someone desiring to make this a career, the duration would be much longer and equally as intensive as well as extensive. Next there you have to be trained and qualified in situational awareness scenarios, again this is classroom and practical applications. After that is small arms and weapons training and yes you have to not only qualify but there is classroom time involved as well as a written test. Last but definitely not least, there is the physical test that you must pass. If you are going to be required to carry a weapon, for your place of employment then there is a statewide test or course you are required to take. You will be given that information when you reach that point in your hiring process.
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Christopher’s Answer

I was an armed/unarmed guard in a different state.
The biggest hurdle I faced was actually gaining the certifications, which in my state is a state-endorsed certification.
This involved an unarmed certification, then an armed certification.
The hardest part of these was just finding an organization near me that gave the classes, I found a way around this by getting hired by security companies which would give me the training as a part of employment. This isn't all that hard to find, it just takes some looking around and some patience.

The biggest hurdle on the job was the aspect of dealing with diverse people and situations, while ALSO dealing with my own emotional responses. Imagine that you just started taking really extreme martial arts classes where they teach you how to break arms and stuff. Then imagine that your entire circle of closest friends has turned on you are are bullying you. Now imagine that you just found out that your best-best friend is the one who turned them all against you, and now they are poking their finger in your chest, saying "You won't touch me, go ahead, GO AHEAD, TOUCH ME" or something just as extreme. Think about how you would feel. The feelings of deep hurting, betrayal, defiance, extreme anger.
Sometimes as a security guard you will have to handle situations that, in the moment, feel EXACTLY like that.
But you cannot react the way you want to, AT ALL.
Those situations, for me, were the biggest hurdles of actually having the job.
Most days were just boring.
Some days felt very bad.
I will say that my time as a guard gave me plenty of time to figure out what else I wanted out of life, and figure out a plan to actually get it done.

Christopher recommends the following next steps:

Google "how to get Armed Guard license
Copy/paste the instructions that you find
Get on Indeed and start looking for armed guard jobs that say they'll help you get the license
If they all say "Must start as unarmed guard" then look for jobs that say they'll get you licensed
Once you get an unarmed license, when you feel comfortable moving on, find a job that will get you the armed license.
Thank you comment icon Thank you, this is amazing! I really needed it. Joseph
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