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What are the most effective strategies for seeking a position as a highschool teacher?

I hope to learn about the most effective strategies.

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Subject: Career question for you

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Harish’s Answer

Hi Charity, great question.

High school teachers generally pursue a major/minor in teaching/education during their undergrad, and afterwards get a Master's in teaching/education.

I recommend you pursue a major similar to whichever subject(s) you are planning to teach (such as math, english, history, art, PE .etc.) and a minor in teaching/education. You can get a Master's degree in teaching/education after you graduate college.

Do your research into which subjects have the highest need for teachers; it'll generally be easier to get a job teaching these subjects.

Make sure that you have a backup career in case it's difficult to find a job. For example, if you want to become a science teacher, perhaps take a science major in college (chemistry, physics, biomedical engineering .etc.) that has a lot of market demand. This way, if it's hard to find a teaching job, you can simply work in the private sector. And once you find a teaching job, schools will respect the fact that you have real-world experience from your private sector job.

Research which states/cities have the most jobs and best salaries/career paths; there is a big variance across the country. Schools in urban areas and in wealthier states/counties generally pay their teachers more.

https://www.business.org/hr/workforce-management/best-us-states-for-teachers/
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TLAURENTONI’s Answer

Create recruitment materials
Go to teacher job fairs
Seek referrals
Get active on social media
Create a search engine optimization .l
Use online job boards
Inquire with previous teachers
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Maddie’s Answer

Hi Charity,

I may not be a teacher just yet (although I'm excited about maybe becoming one someday!), but I have some friendly suggestions for you. Why not try seeking guidance from your professors or mentors? They're usually a great source of wisdom. You could also reconnect with your high school teachers - they might have valuable insights to share. Keep an eye on job boards like Indeed or Glassdoor; they often have exciting opportunities. Make sure to excel in your student teaching classes; they're your practical training ground. And remember to chat with your friends who are education majors. They might have some leads if they've succeeded in their job hunts.
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Dan’s Answer

Hi, Charity. One of the ways, after you have completed college, is to go the private school route. A Master's is usually preferred, but plenty of people get hired with a Bachelor's degree alone. You can sign up with one of the placement agencies--Carney Sandoe or International Placement Services--and they seek to match you up with private high schools that have openings in your field. Good luck!
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Michelle’s Answer

I would apply to substitute or co- teaching within the district you live. This will allow you to gain a clear understanding of different schools environment and to network.
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Ethiopia’s Answer

I would research what positions in your area are most needed and see if they match up with your qualifications. Those are the positions that will get you working probably almost immediately. However, it seems that most schools are in need of teachers so it might not be so difficult to get a position.
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Bethany’s Answer

Hello! There are many paths to becoming a teacher. Many people get their degree in education with a focus on a particular content area. Others get their undergrad in a certain subject (example: history), and then go on to get an alternative certification where you start teaching and do a one-year course where at the end you get your certification. Each state is going to have different laws about this so definitely make sure you check on the requirements for your state. The best thing to set you up for success would be to get a degree in education, do student teaching, and then get your masters in education. I hope this helps.
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