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Relationship between coworkers and your boss ?

How to manage relationships with coworkers and your boss?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Delia’s Answer

No.
No.
No.
No.
No!!!
I know you're asking for advice, but I also know you're going to do what you want to do..... no matter what advice is given. I GET IT! I'm guilty of the same thing! I'm at fault for being defiantly hard headed & doing my own thang! I listened to my heart when I shoulda been listening to my head!
You'll regret it. I PROMISE YOU, it's not worth it!!
NEVER MIX BUSINESS WITH PLEASURE!!! Slowly read my last statement again. Scream it out loud, if you have to, & ger it through your head!
Think about it.... you're obviously having second thoughts cause you're asking for advice online..... you know what's making you have those worrisome thoughts??? Your gut. YOU ALWAYS LISTEN TO YOUR GUT! IT NEVER LIES!
Idk what position you hold in the situation, be it the boss or the employee, but a person of stature should be aware of the fall backs & should know better than to throw everything away.
I'm going to say it again. Listen to your gut! If you already need advice of this magnitude before a relationship starts should tell you enough. Drama. Drama. Drama.
Good luck!
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Eric’s Answer

Every person, whether a boss or a coworker, comes from their own unique background and collection of experiences in and out of the workplace. Treating every individual with respect and being in the mindset of wanting to help them solve their problem goes a long way. Cooperation and helpfulness goes a long way, but do be sure to maintain healthy boundaries to ensure that you don't become the one responsible for managing other peoples' tasks/problems.

As someone who is in a support role and has 350 employees under 3 executives, I am often the go-to person for all misc. questions and find myself stepping in to help more often than not. It has taken me years of practice (and a couple failures along the way) to realize that I am not here to solve everyone's problem and make their lives easier. Instead, I am here to contribute to a mission and the mission is not mine to own completely. Own your space first; help where you can if you can- any amount of help is still help.
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Katelyn’s Answer

I'm going to answer this through the lens of building relationships with your coworkers and boss aka networking. It is important to put in effort in building your relationships at all levels of the company. This means reaching out to people - ask about getting coffee, or setting up a quick zoom, to get to know people better. Having an established relationship makes it easier when you need to work with someone on a project, or if you need their help with something. Networking is an ongoing effort - you have to consistently make time to connect with other people.

Specifically with your boss, building a relationship can look like having regular one to one meetings to check on your progress for assigned tasks and time for you to ask questions and show your interest in the business. Regular communication is key!
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Margaret’s Answer

"Answered by a PagerDuty Team"

Open communication is KEY! In the workplace you'll encounter many different people with many different personalities - leading with empathy will take you far.

Always seek to understand and don't make assumptions. By asking second and third level questions you can get to the core of a situation and come to the best possible outcome.

Staying open minded and creating trust is especially important in a remote environment for many reasons but including honest conversations and avoiding burnout

Feedback - always be ready to give and receive constructive feedback in a meaningful, timely way. Even early in your career, don't hesitate to give feedback upwards (to management). Creating action plans to track results and progress as a follow up to feedback is essential to building a strong team environment that can weather any storm.

Transparency is necessary for a productive work environment. You'll avoid miscommunication, create solutions, and have a clear roadmap for the future.

You are your own advocate. Your manager and team can support you, but always remember your growth should be your #1 priority.
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Anthony’s Answer

Hello!
Please, note the following, concerning the management of relationship between co-workers and the boss :-
1. The need for cordial relationship all the time.
2. Virtues of honesty, integrity, faithfulness, transparency and accountability at all times.
3. Especially, on the part of the boss, there is the need for the right/correct supervisory activities.
4. Co-workers are to be humble and offer the needed respect to the boss.
5. Co-workers are to love and respect each other.

Best regards in your vision.
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Kelcie’s Answer

*Answered on behalf of a group at PagerDuty* - assuming this question is in regards to professional working relationships within your team

1) Find time to connect with coworkers and your manager on a weekly basis (virtually or in person)

2) Make an effort to understand where your manager is coming from and try to find connections within shared interest areas

3) If possible, for in-person teams - have lunch with your manager and team any time you have the opportunity

4) Remember that your boss is a person outside of work - they aren't super human, and it helps to understand their priorities and responsibilities to your team

5) Assume best intentions - understand that some context can be lost over email and Slack messages, remember that you're all working toward a shared goal and your team wants to see you succeed

6) Ask for feedback on a regular basis - both from peers and managers

7) Review articles on LinkedIn and other career focused journals to gain more insight into ways to connect with your team!
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Megan’s Answer

When you say "relationships" it's important to remember there are different types of relationships - family, friends, romantic, work, etc.

Some people compartmentalize and have friends outside of work only and just work colleagues at work with minimal discussion on personal life.

Some people want to be best friends with their closest co-workers.

It's important to recognize your boundaries and other people's boundaries and be respectful of those. Additionally, make sure you are familiar with any policies or procedures in place with regards to relationship types. For example: family or romantic relationships in my workplace may consistent a conflict of interest and require a person transfer to an entirely different team.

Hope this helps!
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Isabelle’s Answer

Open communication is the key to success. Regular check-ins with your boss and co-workers are important. Ask questions, learn about them, and see what their communication style is like. Some people want a lot of interaction, some would prefer minimal, so it's important to understand each person's preference.
It's very important to keep it very professional at the beginning. It's ok to ask ice-breaker types of questions (how was your weekend? etc) but keep it fairly work-related at first. If it becomes a friendship later, that's ok too, but be sure to be able to separate work from friendship.
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