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What steps could I take after a 4-year college to ensure I get into a medical school/program?

My plan for my career is to take 4 years of biology then transfer over to a medical school, but I am unsure what steps I could take to make this happen.

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Raquel’s Answer

A biology degree is a great traditional choice for being pre-med and will get you most of the premed classes you need. It is important to talk with an advisor, if your school has a med school advisor you should definitely talk to them. You'll need one year biology, a biology lab, one year general chemistry with lab, one year organic chemistry with lab, and one year physics with lab. Schools also require some level of psychology/sociology and many require statistics and/or calculus. You should get all of these classes within your degree program. Other good classes to look into, and are required at some but not all schools include: anatomy & physiology, genetics, biochemistry, and cell biology.
In order to start medical school immediately after graduating with your bachelors, you'll need to take the MCAT (entrance exam) in your junior year. The application cycle opens in June every year, so you'll want to apply the summer between your junior and senior years.
There are many things medical schools look for besides grades and the MCAT. You'll also need volunteer hours, research, shadowing of a physician, and leadership experience. It takes a lot of work to create a good, well rounded medical school application. You will also need letters of recommendation. Some schools have a pre-med committee that will write your letter packet for you, if not you need to get letters on your own. If that is the case most schools require two from science professors, one non-science professor, and up to two others. An important thing to remember for the extra activities is that schools look at quality over quantity. You want to be able to talk about all the things you put on your application in an interview. You got this!
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Garrett’s Answer

I would start now in HS and continue in college to become involved and participate in extracurricular activities such as sports, clubs, and medical-related activities such as shadowing a doctor or volunteering at a hospital. You want to show on your CV that you are well-rounded and not just all academically talented. Take review courses for SATs, ACT and the MCAT as well to ensure you get top scores. Form solid relationships with faculty, medical professionals and coaches so you can get glowing Letters of recommendation.

This is what I did and I ended up being accepted to 8/9 schools and a scholarship to the med school I attended. There are books out there you can read as well to help you navigate the process and improve your odds of acceptance.
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Craig’s Answer

I answered this before I'll say this, it'll take a little more reading and research but honestly your bachelor's doesn't really matter, nursing, physician, surgeon, doctor program require you knock out certain courses. Look for any major with a bachelor of science program as it will have most of the courses you need to become a medical professional. So you can major, double major, "with a concentration" minor in anything as long as it meets the requirements! If I could do it again I'd choose a combination of the following:
Biology
Chemistry
Biochemistry
Philosophy
Anthropology with a science concentration
Psychology
Physics
Math
Paramedic
Also avoid any pre med/nursing program! If something bad happens you'll be screwed big time
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Rebecca’s Answer

I agree with the great information from Craig and Raquel. As long as you get all the prereq's in your major can be anything you want. I am emergency physician but my bachelors and masters is in anthropology and i was a lab tech before i went back.
Good grades are important - a good story is also really important.
All the applicants to med school have good grades and good scores - you're not getting in with at least descent to great grades. but, being unique and having a passion for something, even other than medicine can really make you stand out in the application and interview process.
They can see right through hours logged as a volunteer at a hospital that didnt mean anything. If you helped with a family business, if you know a lot about music - whatever, share that it will really make you stand out.
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